Have you ever been this lost?

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[ QUOTE ]
Have you ever been this lost?

[/ QUOTE ]

In the early stages of air navigation training several decades ago, while preparing for our first astro exercise, a wizened Instructor from a Shackleton ASR background declaimed to us 'sprogs' - "If you can plot the intercept onto the BINA ( British Isles and North Atlantic ) Plotting Chart you're using, then you're doing something right. It'll get better with practice......" Only some of us managed that!

A little more than a year later, most of us were nav'ing Vulcan bombers down a lane in the sky just a mile wide, after training trips of 2000nm around the Atlantic on pure astro-navigation, every week. The old hands could slip down a half-mile lane, within 10 seconds of pre-planned time, for the annual NATO Bombing Competitions.....

The most useful 'electronic nav aid' of the first boats I raced on for a couple of seasons was a Consol chart..... Ploneis, Bushmills, Stavanger.

Hands up the three forumeers who remember those!

"GIG!"



/forums/images/graemlins/smirk.gif
 

Cornishman

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About 25 years ago I was on watch on the Sail Training Ship Tectona (Plymouth School of Maritime Studies). It was a foggy morning but with the sun shining through. We were, if memory serves, about 10 miles SW of St Martin's Point, Guernsey drifting in a Force 1 breeze from who knows where and enjoying a leisurely breakfast when we heard a shout for help. The radar showed an echo about a half mile away so we fired up the Gardner diesel and went to investigate. We found a small French yacht, no sail hoisted and the anchor chain dangling into the sea. He would not believe the position I gave him, until I showed him the island on the radar. They had anchored the previous night in the Little Russel, but clearly had not put down enough cable and the tide had carried him all the way out to sea overnight without his knowledge.
 

jimi

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I had a Dutch colleague who chartered a boat on a flotilla in the Greek Islands. Slept in one morning and the flotilla skipper indicated the headland round which he should head for the next sop point about 10 miles away. Sander set off and after 3 hours was getting anxious cos the headland seemed no neared after 5 hours was worried and could'nt contact anyone on VHF or mobile phone. After 10 hours was escorted into a harbour in mainland Greece by a passing yacht the headland he'd seen was the mountains on mainland Greece 60 miles away whereas the headland pointed at by the flotilla skipper was just a couple of miles away and looked too close! He managed to reestablish contact by phoning the London office of the Charte Co.!
 

jimi

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Ran the fleet ashore on the Scillies and led to the competition for an improved timekeeper to more accurately enanble position fixing .. Google not required!
 

jamesjermain

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I never cast stones in these situations. I've been lucky in that none of my navigation errors have lead to anything serious - and in my early cruising days there were plenty. Most of them I was able to cover up or I realised my error before anyone else did.

Even now I have the odd senior moment. Very recently I was sailing back west on my own and, for the hell of it, had the electronic nav aids switched off. Towards the end of an 18 hour passage, in the middle of the night, I very nearly turned right for Plymouth at the end of Bolt Tail, which West Country forumites will realise is a very silly thing to do.
 

ccscott49

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Me, me me sir!!! I used consol!! Had an old EMI radio with the correct crystals, wasnt that bad either!
Half of this lot havent even used DECCA! /forums/images/graemlins/laugh.gif
 

Gunfleet

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My f-in-law, now alas dead, was a WWII pilot. He missed England entirely when his instruments went down in cloud and landed eventually (and relieved) on the Curragh!
 

TiggerToo

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[ QUOTE ]
Towards the end of an 18 hour passage, in the middle of the night, I very nearly turned right for Plymouth at the end of Bolt Tail, which West Country forumites will realise is a very silly thing to do.

[/ QUOTE ]

...breakfast in Hope Cove?
 

Cornishman

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Oooh! I dunno, JJ. You could have anchored in Hope Cove and paid your respects to the late, great Des who used to live there. Anyway, you aren't old enough to be having senior moments yet. Must be summat else.
 

HoratioHB

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'The most useful 'electronic nav aid' of the first boats I raced on for a couple of seasons was a Consol chart..... Ploneis, Bushmills, Stavanger.

Hands up the three forumeers who remember those!'

Yup me too - Consul and Loran - lots of dots and dashes I seem to remember.

I also managed to skip decca lanes when navigating one of Her Majesties grey war canoes back from France to Plymouth as Second Officer of the Watch. The skipper came on the bridge and asked me where the Eddystone light was and I said well on the starboard bow, without thinking - cos that was what the fixes on my chart said. Of course this would have meant we were steaming directly for Falmouth and was not the answer he was expecting. A very interesting one way conversation then ensued - must have been at least 15Km.
 
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