How I hate the anchor trip line

Robih

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Am I alone In my dislike of deploying an anchor trip line? I have a trip line from the back of the fluke up to a block which is attached to a pick up buoy. Line then through the block with a lead weight on the other end so the float is pulled directly over the anchor by the upward tension on the vertical line from the fluke to block. All good methinks. But then the flukey wind blows the boat over the top of the anchor buoy and it disappears under the boat, then pops up the other side. So skipper stress develops at the thought of the trip line getting wrapped around keel, rudder or prop. Sometimes I think the worry of not getting the anchor up is less than the stress induced by the trip line. Do all of you old sea dogs just chuck it over the side and don’t worry about it?

I should confess to an incident twenty years ago in the Morbihan where I had the trip line wrapped tightly around the prop which required a dive to sort it - so there’s bad history in my head!

Any wise guidance as to technique and stress reduction gratefully received……
 

Supertramp

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Agree, especially in tide rode spots where a trip line is advisable. I don't bother with a block!/weight but hank off the extra metres to the buoy if anchoring shallow. Not the end of the world if the buoy disappears at high tide. Long keel so less of a worry. Trouble is if you don't use the trip line in areas where there are or have been moorings you worry even more.

I am inclined to not use it in "clean" anchorages.
 

Roberto

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After having tried all of them, if necessary I now use type "E".
It does not tangle either boat/keel/chain even after repeated 180° turns, it does not annoy other boats passing by, no need to swim to use it.
The floaters must be made of stiff foam, those for underwater nets; the swimming pool ones come up crushed.


grippia.JPG

Here it is, on the anchor side a fixed shackle is better, sometimes the opening ones have gone free, possibly because of the amount of soil accumulating around them. The other one is attached to a specific point of the chain where I put some markers.

tripping line.jpg
 
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dgadee

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Almost caused me to beach. A swimmer was spotted and helm turned as anchor chain coming in. Trip line around prop. Wind blowing me onto San Sebastian beach and no emergency anchor on deck. Luckily got onto vhf and was pulled away. Now always have a light anchor ready to go and no trip line.
 

Star-Lord

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Am I alone In my dislike of deploying an anchor trip line? I have a trip line from the back of the fluke up to a block which is attached to a pick up buoy. Line then through the block with a lead weight on the other end so the float is pulled directly over the anchor by the upward tension on the vertical line from the fluke to block. All good methinks. But then the flukey wind blows the boat over the top of the anchor buoy and it disappears under the boat, then pops up the other side. So skipper stress develops at the thought of the trip line getting wrapped around keel, rudder or prop. Sometimes I think the worry of not getting the anchor up is less than the stress induced by the trip line. Do all of you old sea dogs just chuck it over the side and don’t worry about it?

I should confess to an incident twenty years ago in the Morbihan where I had the trip line wrapped tightly around the prop which required a dive to sort it - so there’s bad history in my head!

Any wise guidance as to technique and stress reduction gratefully received……
Never use one.
 

Kelpie

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After having tried all of them, if necessary I now use type "E".
It does not tangle either boat/keel/chain even after repeated 180° turns, it does not annoy other boats passing by, no need to swim to use it.
The floaters must be made of stiff foam, those for underwater nets; the swimming pool ones come up crushed.


View attachment 158233

Here it is, on the anchor side a fixed shackle is better, sometimes the opening ones have gone free, possibly because of the amount of soil accumulating around them. The other one is attached to a specific point of the chain where I put some markers.

View attachment 158234
What's the difference between 'A' and 'C'?

I rarely use a trip line now. Got in the habit whilst going down the Portuguese coast because most of the anchorages were in industrial harbours with potentially foul bottoms. But have had a couple of close shaves with the boat running over the line. And in Muros the resident dolphin took a fancy to the trip buoy and tried to take it away. It's still got the tooth marks.

I'm really surprised that anybody bothers with a trip line in places where the water is warm, shallow, and clear. Not only can you see what's going on, but you can easily dive to fix it. Maybe it's to mark out their space to stop anybody getting too close.
 

Robih

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What's the difference between 'A' and 'C'?

I rarely use a trip line now. Got in the habit whilst going down the Portuguese coast because most of the anchorages were in industrial harbours with potentially foul bottoms. But have had a couple of close shaves with the boat running over the line. And in Muros the resident dolphin took a fancy to the trip buoy and tried to take it away. It's still got the tooth marks.

I'm really surprised that anybody bothers with a trip line in places where the water is warm, shallow, and clear. Not only can you see what's going on, but you can easily dive to fix it. Maybe it's to mark out their space to stop anybody getting too close.
I’m talking about 15m of Scottish Loch water……frostbite before you reach the bottom…..
 

Roberto

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What's the difference between 'A' and 'C'?
"A" is the fixed length rope one, "C" should represent that sort of automatic buoys which adjust the length following the height of tide: some are massive (like the Swi-Tec one) and can be used to retrieve the anchor, other have rather flimsy ropes and are more used to signal the position of the anchor to others than to recover it (ex. "Anchor Roll").
 

byanyothername

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Caught my anchor on an old mooring chain or something last summer. Was very happy to have a trip line rigged. Been thinking about how much I love the anchor trip line since then.
 

noelex

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But then the flukey wind blows the boat over the top of the anchor buoy and it disappears under the boat, then pops up the other side. So skipper stress develops at the thought of the trip line getting wrapped around keel, rudder or prop.
This happens often enough to be a real nuisance.

The best solution is to only use a trip line if it is absolutely necessary and then take the additional precaution of having a weak link (a cable tie works well) a couple of metres below the float. If the float catches on a boat the weak link will break, freeing the float. If you do need to pull the anchor out backwards there should be enough slack to hook onto the trip line before the weak link.

There are other solutions such as some of those outlined in post #7. "D" and "E" are worth considering, but these are less effective if the anchor is caught or especially if the chain is trapped.
 

Plum

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Am I alone In my dislike of deploying an anchor trip line? I have a trip line from the back of the fluke up to a block which is attached to a pick up buoy. Line then through the block with a lead weight on the other end so the float is pulled directly over the anchor by the upward tension on the vertical line from the fluke to block. All good methinks. But then the flukey wind blows the boat over the top of the anchor buoy and it disappears under the boat, then pops up the other side. So skipper stress develops at the thought of the trip line getting wrapped around keel, rudder or prop. Sometimes I think the worry of not getting the anchor up is less than the stress induced by the trip line. Do all of you old sea dogs just chuck it over the side and don’t worry about it?

I should confess to an incident twenty years ago in the Morbihan where I had the trip line wrapped tightly around the prop which required a dive to sort it - so there’s bad history in my head!

Any wise guidance as to technique and stress reduction gratefully received……
I gave up on using a trip line many decades ago. When I did use one, had several problems cased by the trip line and never had cause to use one to lift the anchor. Since, I have yet to regret not using one.

Www.solocoastalsailing.co.uk
 

Poignard

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From the 1944 edition of "The Yacht Master's Guide and Coaster's Companion" by F.G.G.Carr*

"Q: What is meant by "skowing" an anchor?

A: Bending the cable with a clove hitch round the crown, as a buoy-rope is bent, and taking the standing part to the ring, to which it is stopped with spunyarn. In the event of the anchor getting foul of some obstruction, if a great vertical strain be put upon the warp, the stopping will part, and the anchor can then be lifted up by the crown."

I have never tried this, or heard of it from any other source.

* Frank George Griffith Carr - Wikipedia
 
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