Jamming Cleat

iamtjc

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I have a jamming cleat on my boat to secure the jib sheet, I have always found it a right pain being very difficult to extract the sheet from the cleat.
Please ignore the tape measure and the rope in the (old) picture which was the furling line when I got the boat.
I have just had the thought that the cleat is on backwards! I haven't found a description of the intended setup/usage for these items. Any comments?

IMG_5387 sm.jpg
 

BabaYaga

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I have a jamming cleat on my boat to secure the jib sheet, I have always found it a right pain being very difficult to extract the sheet from the cleat.
Please ignore the tape measure and the rope in the (old) picture which was the furling line when I got the boat.
I have just had the thought that the cleat is on backwards! I haven't found a description of the intended setup/usage for these items. Any comments?

View attachment 172528
Yes, the wrong way around IMO. And possibly also a little too close to the winch.
This is how mine are located, the cleat pointing towards where the line comes off the drum, plus a few degrees further clockwise.
IMG_9574.jpeg
 

William_H

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On my little boat I had enough deck space between the winch and the edge of the deck to fit a cam cleat. https://www.whitworths.com.au/harken-carbo-cam-cleat-suits-3-10mm-rope (In case there is any doubt about the name of cleat type.)(name) The cleat is fitted in the natural position for (in my case) the crew to pull the jib sheet through, from the most comfortable pulling position (posture). ie squatting or bending facing the winch. Pull sheet in hand over hand with sheet running in the cleat then grab the handle and nip up to full tension.
It doesn't look like OP has enough room, however a plate mounted under the winch can extend into the cockpit to carry a cam cleat. Cam cleat is quickly released by pulling sheet upward.
Now I do a lot of tacking with crew. OP may not do much tight tacking and sail single handed in which case my arrangement will not suit. Though I can reach jib shee3t from helming position. I still think the cam cleat is the best option for ease of release under load and ease of getting jib sheet tension to hold.
It is worth looking at and persevering with jib sheet management that suits you. ol'will
 

Stemar

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The best, but most expensive, solution is to replace the winches with self trailers. If the boat is a keeper, do it soon to get most value from the spend.
A rather more affordable solution is the Barton Wincher
barton-wincher.jpg

No it isn't as good as as a proper self tailer but, while they're silly money for what they are, they're a hellava lot cheaper. I had a couple on my Snapdragon and they worked well. I rarely used the cleats.
 

Snowgoose-1

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I have a jamming cleat on my boat to secure the jib sheet, I have always found it a right pain being very difficult to extract the sheet from the cleat.
Please ignore the tape measure and the rope in the (old) picture which was the furling line when I got the boat.
I have just had the thought that the cleat is on backwards! I haven't found a description of the intended setup/usage for these items. Any comments?

View attachment 172528
I have mine beneath your winch and left of your air vent in a different plane..
Only takes about a turn to hold the line securely . Suits me as a singlehander .
 
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scozzy

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+1 for too close and wrong way! I have cam cleat set back a bit and then a jamming clear further back still in easy reach of helm position.Cam cleat useful if fiddling with trim and then can tie of on jamming cleat when set and happy.my boat is 50ish years old so jot really thinking of taking out a new mortgage for whiz bang winches😄
 

johnalison

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It is the same as with an ordinary cleat in that the first turn takes most of the strain and the friction makes the lock secure, though a round turn with a plain cleat.. Your next problem is how to make the holes look pretty after moving it, bearing in mind that the line has to come down from the top of the windings on the winch.
 

BabaYaga

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I have mine mounted the same way as the OP - but I only pass the sheet under the long horn.
The advantage of mounting it as shown in post #2 is, IMO, that you get a double jamming action on the tail. Firstly between the cleat horn and the substrate, secondly between the sheet coming from the winch and the side of the cleat. The first turn around the rounded end also adds a bit of friction.
Still quite easy to cast the sheet off the cleat.
 

Buck Turgidson

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As said, it's the wrong way round. I really liked them with non tailing winches, very easy to use. I did however upgrade my gear last year as after a some medical issues I'm a little more single handed than I used to be so wanted self tailing primaries and also separate secondary winches for my spinnakers. Unfortunately Im a bit limited in space and aesthetics is a thing for me too. I couldn't find a nice stainless version of the jamming cleats to use with my secondary winch but a normal cleat is kind of OK. Here is the before and after:
A6D037B3-337A-44B2-A959-4F673775A08F.jpgIMG_6586.JPG
 
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neil_s

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The advantage of mounting it as shown in post #2 is, IMO, that you get a double jamming action on the tail. Firstly between the cleat horn and the substrate, secondly between the sheet coming from the winch and the side of the cleat. The first turn around the rounded end also adds a bit of friction.
Still quite easy to cast the sheet off the cleat.
I'm sure you're correct - that's how the cleats were fitted when I bought the boat. As a single hander, though, I found the added grip of a turn around the cleat was not needed and there was a small saving in tacking time/activity to be got!
 

Refueler

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Oh Dear !!

In fact OP's are correct but I suspect used wrong - especially when I see the photo. Sorry for those of you who have 180'd the cleat to suit ..

The idea should be to take line from winch . pass round the 'long ear' of the cleat to lock - then cross over top of cleat body and then under and round front 'short ear' to finish. The reason being that strain on the line should lock it further .. if you reverse the cleat - then you defeat the design characteristic.

Of course - you may do as you wish ...
 

onesea

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If it’s a pain it can be improved.
- Cheapest first thought is turn it round, May not be correct but if it makes it better job done.
- Next thought would be traditional cleat - they came on my present boat and 088 is not that hard to do, but slow when trimming.
- You could relocate cleat to inside cockpit combing - again maybe not correct but if it works,
- Jamming cleats are too easy to release IMHO.
- As others have said Barton Winches and self trailers next option, I have sailed with and to be honest the only time I find them any use is for trimming. So for me not worth the money.
 
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RunAgroundHard

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The load goes around the sort horn, then under the long horn and pulled tight, no need for a figure of eight.

This style of cleat is set at about 15 degrees, acute, to where the standing part of the sheet exits the winch, at your desired location, long horn on the winch side. They can be set forward or aft of the winch as required to give a clean turn around the cleat.

I have used this type of cleat countless times with old style Lewmar 45s without any self tailing feature. They work very well and were designed as a fast way of securing, releasing a sheet from a winch before the days of self tailing winches. Standard fare on older boats.

I have used a figure of eight on the cleat, but only on very thin lines. Head sail sheets are quite thick and jam nicely under the long horn

Force 4 Aluminium Jamming Cleat 160mm

Cleat (nautical) - Wikipedia
 

Daydream believer

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Going round the short horn helps with tailing off the winch. Being fairly smooth one can hold the line where one needs it ready to cleat clear of the handle. Then for speed it just needs a nip under the long horn.
if one has the cleat the other way round one has to hold the sheet in the hand the same way but when stopping winching, find the cleat & hook it.
It also matters if one is left or right handed which side of the winch the cleat is placed. One hand on the handle & the sheet in the other round the back of the cleat. It works well that way if 2 people are doing it, The tailer is a bit clear of the wincher. Once the sheet is in the wincher can take the tail & just flip it under the long horn or the tailer can as the wincher removes the handle.
When trimming the sail it is better to release the sail from the long horn & still have a bit of friction from the short horn & still have the sheet on the cleat. The other way round the sheet has to come right off the cleat & one might lose it.
So I am an advocate of round the smooth end first.
It really comes down to preference & a matter of technique.
 
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Refueler

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WRONG WRONG .... the OP's os correct - maybe a bit too close to winch .. but orientation is correct.

As I said before ... line round back of cleat (long arm) to lock .... you can if short tacking or just casual - leave as is .. if you want to secure - then take line over top of cleat and then round short arm ... creating a half 8 ....

If you turn cleat around so long arm is towards winch - you then defeat the design intention.
 
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