Do women prefer new boats?

cutofherjib

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Although I love the look of the older, more traditional boats, I much prefer the interiors of the new boats. I love the spacious well designed interiors these boats have. There's more room, the sofas are comfortable, the galleys are well designed with lots of useful storage, and, most importantly for us girls, the heads are roomy and easy to keep clean. I love a nice loo, with a holding tank. No more bucket and chucket for me!

I like the look of this one:

http://www.hanseyachts.co.uk/showdetails.asp?boatid=17#
 

Ubergeekian

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Such grace! Such style! Lovely!

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cutofherjib

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I see your point, but do not see the similarity quite honestly. I do like the appearance of the older more traditional boats as stated, but it's the interiors I was putting up for discussion.
 

BlackPig

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older traditional boats were designed for the shape of the hull to do the job. They were then fitted out as best as the could, or modified from working to leisure. Modern designs are often designed to other way. The living area is designed then a hull put around it. High windage, fat boats. This of course is very generalised, but........ is it true
 

Ubergeekian

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I see your point, but do not see the similarity quite honestly. I do like the appearance of the older more traditional boats as stated, but it's the interiors I was putting up for discussion.

Ah, yes, the Starbucks look. Lovely, as long as the boat doesn't do anything horrid like "moving about" or "tipping over". Can't be a girly thing, per se - the two women I have sailed with regularly both seem to prefer boats that work at 45 degrees. Anyone asked Ellen McArthur whether she prefers a nice big galley to usable grab handles?

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Duffer

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I see your point, but do not see the similarity quite honestly. I do like the appearance of the older more traditional boats as stated, but it's the interiors I was putting up for discussion.

You might like the new Jeanneau that has floor level lighting under the settees.
 

cutofherjib

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I have no wish to sail single handed around the world. I am very happy spending the weekend and holidays on a boat. I enjoy sailing and used to sail dinghies. I am now ready for something a little more comfortable for my leisure.
 

SolentBoat

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Women are far more realistic about how the boat will actually be used, IME[1].

Us chaps will ramble on about lee cloths, sea berths, galley straps etc but our wives will be looking for comfy sofas, hammock space and double beds.

Given than 99% of boats sold spend 99% of their time venturing no further than another marina within the Solent, I reckon the bints have got it right.

[1] Admittedly, a very small sample size.
 

bbg

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you can just ignore the condescending comments of supergeek. He can't afford a new boat and is jealous.
 

Coaster

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I have no wish to sail single handed around the world. I am very happy spending the weekend and holidays on a boat...

There is a small but vociferous minority here that appears to believe that boating should be arduous, uncomfortable and difficult, and anything straying from that path is wrong. I'm not in that camp. Frankly, neither are most other people, judging by what appeals to many buyers of new and good second-hand boats.

For me a comfortable interior is much more important than reduced windage; easy sail handling beats the extra half knot gained by fussing with complicated sails; an expensive, quiet, freshwater flush wc discharging to a holding tank is worth much more than a spinnaker; and if the wind isn't right then switch on a sufficiently powerful motor, preferably with an Autoprop to keep noise levels down - when we're under engine the sound made by the sea is often noisier than the machinery.
 

Ubergeekian

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There is a small but vociferous minority here that appears to believe that boating should be arduous, uncomfortable and difficult, and anything straying from that path is wrong.

Are there? Do they include those of us who think that a cabin which is uncomfortable to the point of dangerous when at sea is unnecessary hardship?
 
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Although I love the look of the older, more traditional boats, I much prefer the interiors of the new boats. I love the spacious well designed interiors these boats have. There's more room, the sofas are comfortable, the galleys are well designed with lots of useful storage, and, most importantly for us girls, the heads are roomy and easy to keep clean. I love a nice loo, with a holding tank. No more bucket and chucket for me! ....

Its nice to know what you like, prevents disappointment if things dont turn out as expected. Are you making a point or just announcing?

My Rival 41C has all the features you mention (except the holding tank) and she was built in 1974. I also have a four burner hob, grill and oven, have fine dined in great comfort around my saloon table, bonked in standing head room fore and aft cabins athwart ships, dumped in opulent spaciousness (the aft heads is narrow but the forward head is the width of the boat) and showered standing while yielding the scrubbing brush with vigour.

Not bad for a 36 year old boat.
 

Ubergeekian

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I don't understand your question.

OK, I'll try to explain it in simpler terms. You said "There is a small but vociferous minority here that appears to believe that boating should be arduous, uncomfortable and difficult"

Now to me, sailing in a boat which has a huge cabin lacking handholds, proper sized fiddles and that sort of thing is indeed "arduous, uncomfortable and difficult". So I wondered if that was the sort of ardour, discomfort and difficulty you had in mind. Is it?

There are lots of anacdotal stories about partners, invariably women, who (a) hate sailing and (b) demand huge spacious below decks accommodation. I wonder, occasionally, which is chicken and which is egg. Are people choosing boats which are uncomfortable when sailing so they hate sailing so they spend more time in a marina so they want more room so they have less comfort at sea so they are even less comfortable and so on and so on and so on?

OP, instead of worrying about what women want, why not work out what you want? If your sailing is likely to be generally shortish trips in sheltered waters with lots of relaxing (or whooping it up) in marinas at each end then a modern, spacious, high-volume (ooh, what a euphemism) boat will probably suit you very well. If, on the other hand, you discover that your dinghy sailing roots lead you to enjoy cheerful thrashes across the sea, you might be disappointed and want something a little more cramped/cosy/seaworthy (delete as applicable).

It's going to be your own boat. Make your own choice.
 

nmeyrick

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It's going to be your own boat. Make your own choice.

Well said - it really is horses for courses. There's nothing wrong with a big AWB with lots of windage; it will do some things better than a narrow MAB, and others less well.

For myself I chose a 1977 Rival which is a superb sea boat and cozy but comfortable. She's far from cramped, but hardly the sort of starbucks space you would buy for marina use. And for the last three years she's spent most of her life as a marina crash pad.

I suspect there's a lot of truth in the comment about blokes buying for what they think they might one day do whereas women may be more interested in day to day practicality. Same reason you see people driving Land Rovers in town or walking down the high street in gear suitable for climbing Everest.

But where would we be without dreams? Buying the Golf would just be admitting that you're never going to drive over a mountain in it.
 
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