Here's one...

byron

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Here\'s one...

This question is always good for a difference of opinion...
What is the difference twixt a boat and a ship? I always say "A boat can be carried on a ship but a ship cannot be carried on a boat"
Please dont throw the fact that Submarines are called Boats. This is historical and due to the german name U-Boat (Unterzee boote) Other than that lets hear your versions.


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coliholic

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Re: Here\'s one...

Why have you got a very bad photo of Prince Andrew in full Naval regalia as your piccie? Was he inspecting your ship at the time;-)
 

ChrisP

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Re: Here\'s one...

I was once told it was something to do with the rigging in sailing ship day's but I can't remember what it was. Could be I was drunk at the time. Anyway who cares as long as you get out of the way of the big ones.

Another one for deliberation.

What is the origin of calling small boys "Nippers"

Answer can be fould in the National Maritime Museum.
 

claymore

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Re: Here\'s one...

I thought a boat was something smaller than the thing you are on and conversely, a ship is something bigger than the thing you are on, Sounds very Navy which probably explains it.
Even though the thing you are on might be bigger than the thing I'm on, I don't think I'd call your thing a ship though - unless you were acting in your official role having accepted the post of President Byron.
I do hope this helps you a whole sight more than it helped me the Doctor says that if I just keep on with the atenolol and don't miss any more appointments with my probation officer, everything should work out fine, apart from the old problem, of course.
regards
JS
 

claymore

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Re: On the right lines. NM

As in nipping round a cleat or making something fast then - done by agile small boys. Not midshipmen because they were not 'common' crew?
 

david_steward

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Re:The answer

Anchor warp was too large to bend around a capstan so a thinner endless rope was used. This rope was bound to the anchor warp using nipping lines. The small boys that did this work became nippers.

As per Oxford Companion to Ships and the Sea.

Dave S
 
G

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Re: Here\'s one...

Version I heard was that a ship can stay at sea in any weather (F1-F10 or maybe F12), whereas a boat will always run for shelter at some point.
 

jfm

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Re: eezy peezy

When something big lands in the water, eg Colin's cellphone, or a crouton mixed into Bazzer's Dungeoness soup, it goes "spur lash"
 

BarryD

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Ohh ple-eezzze

Spur Lash - Actually more a modern day BMW term (see where I'm going JFM?) that is used to signify the amount and type of gaffer tape and string that is used to hold the headlight in when the normal exceedingly soft body work fails. Due to say running into a Nissan not marked on the nav aids, maybe...

Compliments of the season

Barry
 

jfm

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Re: Ouch!!!

ROTFL !

Just got estimate. 600 labour, 250 paint. Parts per list price. That's enuf paint to antifoul the QE2 isn't it? They really have you over a barrel, it's not like you can go and gettit from Dulux/Homebase. Anyway I shall claim from CMap on grounds Nissan was not on the chart
 
G

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Re: Here\'s one...

I have always understood that a ship is defined as any vessel that is self sufficient and capable of making voyages. The Dutch refer to almost any boat as a "Schip."
 
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