Hello pls help!

adie

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Hi to all, just got my very first boat after a lifetime of waiting for one,
Bit embarressed really as it is hardly a boat anyway /forums/images/graemlins/blush.gif (16ft fletcher speed boat) but it's a start! would really appreciate any advice about inshore boating off the west coast of Scotland?
 

Whitelighter

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blimey, I don't know mmuch about Scotland I'm afraid, but the Fletchers are well regarded boats. Be warned though, it is an addiction for most.

A warm welcome to the forum, I am sure one of the bods will be along with local knowlege any minute
 

sarabande

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That sounds like really good fun. Nice boat.

Perhaps join a club, talk to other mobers about safety kit (lifejackets, flares, bailer / pumps, etc) and then consider charts / GPS. Involve the family in planning where to go, what to do (land on small beach, barbecue, is a great thing for children). Engine servicing and maintenance, onboard spares, are important and satisfying if you KNOW that it's in good condition due to your own efforts

Can I mention insurance, RYA courses, etc ? They all enable you to enjoy boating in different ways, as your skills and ambition develop.
 

adie

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Thanks for that guys, Im already sorted with the insurance! got the life jackets and flares, was more worried about underwater obstacles (reef's etc) if i bought a Chart plotter/GPS would it show the position of such obstacles relevant to my own?

Could anyone reccomend a good model/ price perhaps with fish finding capability also?
 

Whitelighter

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Yes, provided you purchase the optional detailed chart data for your area the GPS Plotter will show obstacles. For £20 each though, it is worth investing in the paper admiralty charts and familiarising yourself with you local area.

As for a recomendation, The Navaman range of plotters are very good, and can have a fishfinder added for reasonable cost. About £600 should get a decent system with chart and fish finder.
 

sarabande

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Sounds as if you heading along the right route to a lot of enjoyment.

Studying a paper chart will enable you to carry a "mind map" with you, of the local rocks and other problems. Don't forget to work out the effect of tides on depth below the keel.

Electronic charting is a complex subject, and we have lots of experts on the Forum with advice on costs and model. Iguess that for a small boat you might be best to start with a handheld eTrek, and a paper chart, before you invest !

Above all , talk with other boaters and ask questions of people nearby. You'll get lots of free advice, and soon learn to sift it !

Leave contact details with someone ashore, and a rough indication of where you are going.

The more you put into preparation and skill enhancement, the more you and your family will enjoy the experience.
 

Major Catastrophe

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Welcome to the forum and yes, a 16ft fletcher is still a boat, so you are part of the 'brotherhood'. (Sisterhood as well, before the girls have a go at me)

My advice, if you are not sure or unhappy about going to certain places inshore, don't go there or get local advice. Sometimes I even go and look at places from the land at very low tides, so that I can see any potential hazards. (Big boat owners will not understand this need for small boat owners to mess about in shallow water). Wear your kill cord and always allow reserve fuel in your tank.

Most importantly, got anyone swimming? Turn the engine off. Human legs are not very tolerant of props.
 

Nick_H

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Varmint

Welcome, remember its not how big it is, its what you do with it that counts.

Your question about the chartplotter indicates you may need a bit more familiarity with charts before venturing out. You don't need to be an expert, but you will need a basic knowledge of weather forecasts, navigation, and boat handling. You could get enough knowledge to start with in one day with an instructor.
 

Clyder

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Hello and welcome to the mad house...

Where on the coast are you thinking of?? I'm based at Largs and have a 21ft Bayliner and have had many good days in this area...boats of similar size etc...

Your Fletcher would be fine in this area in most sea states, we get very good protection from the Cumbraes, Arran and Bute, with the benefit of many day sailing destinations. You could easily do Largs-Rothesay-Largs in a day.

Like all things boaty in the beginning keep an eye on the weather and don't over estimate you or your boats capabilities. It's a far wiser man that looks at the sea state and the weather and then decides to keep the boat trailered if it looks a bit iffy.

PM me if you'd like more details of this area and I'll see what I can do.

Cheers

Clyde
 

gjgm

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try and find a few introduction books in a chandlery-usually by RYA. Some are only £7 or so, but often have a few good tips. Thing is when starting, you re not sure whats normal and when its time to panic! Vhf or dsc radio?
 

adie

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Clyder, i will Pm you when i can figure out exactly how to do that, indeed what it means? and possibly if it hurts!

Paperchart looks like the way forwards to start with, i'll look about and see what i can find, where would i go for information on a 1 day course?

Very simple but practicle advise about the tide levels etc, lots and lots to think about on this one!!!

thanks to everyone for your comments and keep em coming,

I love wildlife and wanted to head out of Oban and into some of the bays and islands of that area, but perhaps Largs might also be a good starting point? I've taken her out only twice so far on a local loch, i am more than chuffed with both her speed and handling, but not much free water board for heavy weather though and feel very inferior to the large and glamerouse cruisers!

Just have to content myself with the thought of filling her full of new toys now!
 

itsonlymoney

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[ QUOTE ]
feel very inferior to the large and glamerouse cruisers!

[/ QUOTE ]

No matter what you've got someones got a better / bigger one. No need to feel inferior. Enjoy.

PS - Welcome aboard.
 

Erre

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Include appropriate charts, knowledge of tides, the basic "rules of the road", good and connected ground tackle and a vhf radio on your list.

Keep speaking & listening with folk. You will soon sort out the b**********s from the ones with sage advice.

Welcome to a great new world and enjoy in safety a fine hobby.
 

oldgit

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No1.Paddles and a anchor of some sort.

Hi Varmint and welcome.Many on here(most of us ) will have started out with something very similar to your Fletcher.Going to take a guess that you will be starting on a budget.Forget that fancy arm and a leg chartplotter costing nearly as much as the boat,you will simply not be going far enough for long enough to justify the dosh.A cheapo depth sounder/fish finder for around £100 is of much more use and a cheapo ship to shore radio.
A spare fuel tank (with actual petrol in it)will save a lot of worry.I always carried a spare 25L tucked away under the rear seat of my many speedy boats which used the same fuel line snap connector to the outboard .Under no circumstances will you want to be refilling with a can and funnel out there in any condtions,it stinks and is messy.Get to know your local area bit by bit so you can find you way home by eyeball and if you ever find you needed a chartplotter to guide you home,you should not have been out there in the first place. /forums/images/graemlins/smile.gif
 

adie

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Re: No1.Paddles and a anchor of some sort.

Sage advice "Oldgit", with regards to the ship to shore radio?

If i get a VHF i understand that i have to have a license, but if i had a radio without a license, would i only need the license to use it or own it?
And if i only ever used it in a genuine emergency, what would be the implications of no license?

so many questions and so little typing skill!
 

oldgit

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Re: No1.Paddles and a anchor of some sort.

The licence is available on-line free of charge from OFCOM,so no reason not to get one.You are supposed to have an operators licence as well.
Get your radio whatever,cos if things really go tits up,the last thing you or the authorities will be worrying about is a piece of paper.
 
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