YANMAR Spare Parts on Internet

RAI

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Does anyone have recommendations for a good Yanmar spare parts dealer on internet? I need bits for a 4JH4E.
 

nemodreams

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French Marine really know their stuff and will go out of their way to help. Not the cheapest though. There is a lot of non genuine stuff around being sold almost as expensive as genuine Yanmar - especially gasket sets.

Geoff
 

Talulah

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Does anyone have recommendations for a good Yanmar spare parts dealer on internet? I need bits for a 4JH4E.

I have just removed my 4JH4E and replaced with a 4JH5E. Haven't decided yet wether to sell off parts or as a running engine. Anything particular I can help with?
 

RAI

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I have just removed my 4JH4E and replaced with a 4JH5E. Haven't decided yet wether to sell off parts or as a running engine. Anything particular I can help with?
That sounds interesting. I am not sure yet, but I maybe be in the market for an entire heat exchanger/exhaust manifold.
But why are you changing the engine? The 4JH4E is not that old?
 

Talulah

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That sounds interesting. I am not sure yet, but I maybe be in the market for an entire heat exchanger/exhaust manifold.
But why are you changing the engine? The 4JH4E is not that old?
Plan is to head off on extended cruise next June. (Possibly retire.) So boat is now being refreshed here where it is much easier. There are a few things left to do but all low cost. i.e. woodwork.
The only exception is the engine. Replacing the engine now should see me through my cruising. The old engine is about 8 years old.
Part of me thinks I should stick it on Boats and Outboards for around £1k just to shift it. However, some of the parts are new as not needed for my set up. i.e. Alternator, Mixing Elbow. I also converted the engine to use serpentine belts last year. May be I should put it back to a V belt and sell on the serpentine kit.
 

RAI

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The old engine is about 8 years old.
Part of me thinks I should stick it on Boats and Outboards for around £1k just to shift it. However, some of the parts are new as not needed for my set up. i.e. Alternator, Mixing Elbow. I also converted the engine to use serpentine belts last year. May be I should put it back to a V belt and sell on the serpentine kit.
That's the same age as mine. I week ago I would have said the 4JH4E had another 30 years of life but the corrosion I have found in the heat exchanger on mine is changing my mind. I did think it odd that there are no anodes in the engine.
Whether it's better to sell it off in bits or just try to get rid of it, is difficult to tell. My inclination would be for the latter. Life is short enough.
 

RAI

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Have a look at the heat exchanger issue here and the price for a new one.
http://www.sailblogs.com/member/aria/?xjMsgID=255985
Yea! Looks a lot like mine. Clearly poor design. An aluminium casting with mild steel bolts holding a brass end-cap onto a copper matrix. No wonder the aluminium casting ends up as an anode, water leaks into bolt holes, bolts corrode in place, trying to remove them shears one off. I've just been there. No wonder too that Yanmar only sell the whole unit, fresh for further electrolytic destruction. I think I would/will be looking for a different manufacturer if I have to replace this 8 year old engine.
 

Talulah

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If it's any consolation I wouldn't replace the heat exchanger. I would take the unit off and have the end schemed. Yanmar use too thin an olive that sits in a recess. With the end skimmed down as far as the bottom of the recess and the bolts drilled out repair the threads with a Helicoil or similar. Make new gaskets out of silicon sheet.
 

RAI

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If it's any consolation I wouldn't replace the heat exchanger. I would take the unit off and have the end schemed. Yanmar use too thin an olive that sits in a recess. With the end skimmed down as far as the bottom of the recess and the bolts drilled out repair the threads with a Helicoil or similar. Make new gaskets out of silicon sheet.
That's what I'm hoping to get done. The Yanmar guy is due tomorrow to look.
But reading the experience on your link, makes me think the worst is more likely. The corrosion has weakened the casting badly, it was held together by the paint until I disturbed it.
 

Talulah

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There are other ways to fix this. When someone mentions a 'Yanmar Guy' I cringe but without knowing the Yanmar guy that's unfair.
If I was doing a DIY repair my Plan B would be as follows: (Relatively cheap.)
It would include doing away with the Yanmar end caps all altogether.
At the stern end assuming you've drilled out the bolts and used a helicoil or similar now make a new end cap out of flat plate.
First flatten down the end of the heat exchanger and housing to cut back the corrosion.
You need two pieces of square plate to fit on the end. Both pieces need to be drilled for the mounting bolts to pass through
In one using a hole cutter cut out a hole slightly smaller than the heat exchanger cannister. This is a spacer.
In the other drill out a hole and fit a 1" hosetail. Assemble using silcon sheet to make gaskets.
Repeat for the other end.
Originally the seawater for cooling would pass along the bottom of the heat exchanger and return in the top half before exiting to the mixing elbow. With the new set up it passes along the length of the heat exchanger once.
I think this repair would last a number of years.

Because you may be limited on what's available. The spacer pieces could be made by cutting up Polyethalene bread/cutting board. Silcone gaskets can be made from silcone place mats.
 
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RAI

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Thanks for the suggestion Talulah. I'll take things one step at a time.
Getting the unit off is the first problem. I'm short on accessibility. The alternator has to come off and is proving a bit of a Chinese puzzle.
The heat exchanger element actually protrudes an mm into the end cap with its own end gasket to keep the salt water inside.
The O-ring is supposed to prevent the fresh water from escaping, and its grove in the casting is badly eroded. Since the freshwater is pressurised, it's going to need a good seal.
Anyway, one step at a time.
 
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