Tiller

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Guest

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Anybody got any advice on the makign of a new tiller.

Mine is a about 1.5m long and has a long curve in it. is it best to use a single piece of wood or a sandwich of others.

Also at the handle end my original one has another piece of wood fitted into it.
What is the reason for this and do i need to do it to my new tiller..?
 

jet_morgan2000

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Joined
29 Sep 2001
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58
Hi Mike, I made a replacement tiller for my Invicta and used laminated Ash.
a) it is easier to 'bend' and b) looks good when smoothed off etc.,
It is still in my garage and is yours if you want it.
I can send you a JPG of it later today if you are interested ???
Regards,
BWM
 
G

Guest

Guest
A long while ago PBO did an article on laminating tillers.

I would use the laminated way, with thin sheets, as you basically can :

take a flat board the length of the tiller. Fix nails / posts along the drawn shape of the tiller, side view of course. THen you use slow setting glue and lay into the design the strips of laminate, forming them around the posts / nails to achieve the desired shape. Once all is dry and set, you remove it, having remembered to wax the board before gluing !!!! and then shape / sand and varnish the finished article. Using light and dark laminates can give an excellent decoartive effect to the tiller.

As to inserting a piece of wood in the end ..... no idea, as my two tillers have just the timber from the main part and no additions ..... FYI - one is straight and is my emergency tiller, slightly shorter than the main, which is curved and sleek with decorative ropework hand hold on the end !
 
G

Guest

Guest
I've seen lost of tillers made up in this way but i prefer what i already have.
it's a single piece of wood that is cut into shape and not bent. I can tell this by the grain along the side.
Are there any problems with this method of construction..??
 
G

Guest

Guest
The bent or laminated tends to carry greater strength or resistance as the grain is continuous throughout its length. Also with the laminated, you get the glue strength adding to the final product. I would always check that a single timber unit does not have grain ending at crucial points or grain not running majority of the length. A straight tiller of course does not have this problem if correctly cut.

I must admit that I like laminated for its decorative as well.
 

oldsaltoz

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4 Jul 2001
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Australia, East coast.
Avago

Hi Mike.
Laminated timber tillers are stronger and less prone to splitting provided they are well made, some made from marine grade ply are fitted with a small solid timber end to protect it and to help keep moisture out of the end grain and exposed glue. The finished article looks ok; staining alternate strips of timber adds a nice effect. You don’t have to be a master craftsman to build one, and you don’t need heaps of special tools. The finished item can be varnished, oiled or painted, oiling requires the least work for the best look and provided good protection.
Avaniceone Old Salt Oz
 

jet_morgan2000

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Joined
29 Sep 2001
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58
If you can find a piece of timber that has grown with the bend in that you require, as in the old Oak built ships, where they would inspect a tree to see if any of the shapes of branches matched the contour of the ships ribs etc., then you would have continuous grain along the length of the tiller.
Where the grain is at an angle to the long length of the tiller is the place where any problems might arise.
When you take into consideration how much force YOU can apply when heaving on the tiller, unless the grain is at 90 degrees to the tiller length, you probably won't have too much to worry about.
Just find a 'blank' piece of timber and carve the shape you want.
Regards,
BWM.
 

Sammy

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Joined
26 Jun 2001
Messages
100
Laminate it using two different coloured woods for effect make the laminates about 3-5 mm thick depending on how much of a curve is required. Use epoxy to glue it together and also to finish it with you can varnish over the epoxy to make it stand up to the ultraviolet light. Mine has lasted for about 6 years with this finish and still no further treatment required.
 

johnt

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Joined
30 May 2001
Messages
206
you didnt say what the boat is !

however I sail a trapper 500 which has a long tiller with a double curve in it .

original laminated in cherry and mahogany, it got to about 22 years old and and delaminated BIG TIME ....so now I have one make of S316 ......no problems!
 
G

Guest

Guest
The ol' 316 must be a bit cold on the hands ?????

I like traditional timber thingy's ...........
 
G

Guest

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I was lucky enough to buy a piece of iroko that fitted your description. I used a power planer and then a spokeshave to cut a (slight) curve following the grain as much as possible. It certainly seems immensely strong - it needs to be to steer my Itchen Ferry.
I agree that a laminated tiller is more decorative, but I have this sneaking suspicion of all those glued surfaces.
 

johnt

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30 May 2001
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206
and as a single hander I have better things to do with my time ...Like make the tea! lol
 
G

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Funny actually - I rarely hold mine !!!!!!!!! I normally get someone else to hold it, or put it on the tiller-pilot !!!
I'm normally getting another beer or G&T ....
 
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