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Re trawler yachts, I saw a comment much earlier that talked about gallons per mile - this is a bit pessimistic really.
I met this Nordhavn 46 here some years ago, after they had crossed the Atlantic and I think they were able to achieve around 3 miles per gallon at their cruising speed, maybe even closer to 4 mpg.
Ship STARLET (Pleasure Craft) Registered in USA - Vessel details, Current position and Voyage information - IMO 0, MMSI 367470230, Call sign WDF6062
They had started off from the Eastern Seaboard of the USA, crossed the North Atlantic to Europe, spent years pottering around there, then out to the Caribbean, through Panama and across the Pacific. After about 15 years of living on board they shipped the boat back to the USA from Australia and sold her.

Here is a fairly typical Nordhavn 46 for sale -
https://www.yachtworld.com/yacht/1990-nordhavn-46-9101049/

I am simply mentioning Starlet as a good example of a trawler that has gone a long way without fanfare - I would generally agree though with most of the folk above who are suggesting a sailboat instead.
The important thing to do first is to see if you like sailing..... try a charter holiday on a monohull, and the same on a catamaran and compare the differences.
I did see that trawlers are much better at fuel economy than cruisers, but thats a still a lot of budget if not all on running the engines. I have definitely started looking more into sailboats and monohulls as well as cats as I learn more. Chartering is definitely on the cards for a few years but even when i get a boat i would e pottering around locally to the uk before venturing offshore and any ocean crossing I would employ a skipper at minimum.

I have a long way to go in terms of time, experience and knowledge and I fully expect some things to change during that time as I learn more.
 
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Further stupid questions:

Do you need a boat license to operate a 40' yacht?

and if so, can you get a licence with a RYA day skipper cert? as im hoping I can skip a few smaller individual courses and just do the theory and then the practical over a week (not sure if this is possible or not)
 

Graham376

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Further stupid questions:

Do you need a boat license to operate a 40' yacht?

and if so, can you get a licence with a RYA day skipper cert? as im hoping I can skip a few smaller individual courses and just do the theory and then the practical over a week (not sure if this is possible or not)

No such thing as a license in the UK but you may find it harder to obtain insurance at reasonable price unless you have some experience. RYA courses are well worth doing and then you can have an ICC which should cover you around Europe if asked for qualifications.
 

john_morris_uk

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Further stupid questions:

Do you need a boat license to operate a 40' yacht?

and if so, can you get a licence with a RYA day skipper cert? as im hoping I can skip a few smaller individual courses and just do the theory and then the practical over a week (not sure if this is possible or not)
You can get a ICC (International Certificate of Competence) if you have RYA Day Skipper. You can’t do the DS (Day Skipper) theory AND the practical in a week. It isn’t compulsory to do the DS theory before you do the practical but for someone in your position I’d suggest it’s essential. It would also help you immeasurably if you gained some experience of living and sailing on a cruising yacht.

There’s no compulsory certification in UK waters but you can (in theory) be asked to show an ICC as a minimum in foreign waters. Having said that I’ve never been asked.
 
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Thanks chaps, I have no plan to do the theory and practical in a week, I would probably do the theory online and take the exam, and then the practical in the summer.

Is it possible to do a day skipper without previous experience? or do you need to do more basic courses first?
 

john_morris_uk

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Thanks chaps, I have no plan to do the theory and practical in a week, I would probably do the theory online and take the exam, and then the practical in the summer.

Is it possible to do a day skipper without previous experience? or do you need to do more basic courses first?
The RYA guidelines are clear:day-skipper
 

PlanB

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When we bought our boat (45 flybridge) as complete novices we did RYA day skipper on our own boat almost straight away so that we could then practice and gain confidence at close quarter manoeuvring around the marina and out through the lock onto the river.
The following winter, we did theory over four weekends with an RYA school.
Two years later, we set off for the Med and arrived safely.
 
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When we bought our boat (45 flybridge) as complete novices we did RYA day skipper on our own boat almost straight away so that we could then practice and gain confidence at close quarter manoeuvring around the marina and out through the lock onto the river.
The following winter, we did theory over four weekends with an RYA school.
Two years later, we set off for the Med and arrived safely.
interesting, so there no formal requirement to have "5 days, 100 miles, 4 night hours on board a sailing yacht" it's just best practice. if that's the case then i guess as long as i would be taken on a course without experience then my plan still exists.
 

PlanB

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Well, ours was a power boat, so some of the requirements were different. And it was 20 years ago. But we did have to do a certain number of day and night hours.
Ps Our instructor was a Yachtmaster (Power) examiner, so no requirements were skipped.
 
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Well, ours was a power boat, so some of the requirements were different. And it was 20 years ago. But we did have to do a certain number of day and night hours.
Ps Our instructor was a Yachtmaster (Power) examiner, so no requirements were skipped.
were your hours prior to you being able to take the course? I think i need to call around and ask some training centres some questions.
 

prestomg27

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There are plenty of courses for "zero to hero" - no experience at all to day skipper in a week

Sailing is really very easy :D
Also, a very easy way to get yourself and others in a World of trouble if something goes wrong. Experience helps recognise before something is about to go wrong. Training just accelerates the experience process. Nothing beats the adage that it takes 10,000 hours of doing something to get properly good at it.
 

Sea Change

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When I did my DS, a total novice got his ticket within the week thanks to his attitude and intelligence. And another more experienced candidate came out of it with a Competent Crew. So you might as well jump in and see how you get on, worst that happens is that you come out with a lesser qualification. You'll have learned loads, though
 
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