Panic! Do I need a courtesy flag for Wales?

Ru88ell

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Should I get a Welsh dragon courtesy flag for my week in Porthmadog? They're not into burning boats are they? ;)
 

Cymrogwyllt

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Want to run the risk?;)


Come home to a real fire;)

I dare say that most there will not care. The locals will no doubt appreciate the courtesy
 

Bilgediver

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Should I get a Welsh dragon courtesy flag for my week in Porthmadog? They're not into burning boats are they? ;)

They might burn a sheep on your foredeck and sing funny chants dressed in white robes with hoods. Don t worry you wil be safe so laong as you kow tow to the head honcho:D

Not many ships have actually flown Welsh flags. However there were ships that always flew a welsh flag from the Jackstaff entering and leaving port. It was nice to see the Red Dragon up there in all ports of the world. The ships that flew the flag had one thing in common. They were all called Welsh City.
Afraid to say the tradition is retained here. Jackstaff and Welsh Flag:D:D but different name.
 

Gwylan

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Do not fly that Red Dragon monstrosity that the Victorians palmed us of with, along with a 'Prince' Get the flag of St David and fly it with pride!
 

Shibumi

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As an English taxpayer you have not only paid for the original harbour construction but also it's maintenance ever since.

They should fly the English courtesy flag in appreciation, and, if not, stuff em.
 

SeamanStaines

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Do not fly that Red Dragon monstrosity that the Victorians palmed us of with, along with a 'Prince' Get the flag of St David and fly it with pride!

Not strictly true.... I think that the Dragon itself was always the flag of Wales going back to Roman times however was the battle standard of Owain Glyndwr. Henry Tudor used it as his battle flag when he defeated Richard III at Bosworth fields and used his Welsh Heritage through Owain Tudor of Anglesea to strengthen his claim to the throne. Subsequently the green and white colours of the Tudors where added at various times and in different configurations. The current flag only dates back to 1953, long after the Victorians.
 

Searush

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Strictly speaking Wales is not a sovereign nation state, so a courtesy flag is not "required". But it is a courtesy & I carry (& wear) one. For a short visit, call in at any beach or gift shop & you will find cheap printed ones that you can take off the stick & sew a rope to - or just tie the stick to the lanyard. No-one will be able to tell if they are not aboard.

Have a great time, just remember that Wales has been an occupied country for 700 odd years & the English have not been nice "Occupiers". There are good reasons for bad feeling, but it is seldom shown. Their forbearance of arrogant visitors amazes me, and if you are polite & respectful, you will mostly be treated very well. Better than you might in Blackpool, Bridlington or Brighton in fact.
 

Shibumi

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Strictly speaking Wales is not a sovereign nation state, so a courtesy flag is not "required". But it is a courtesy & I carry (& wear) one. For a short visit, call in at any beach or gift shop & you will find cheap printed ones that you can take off the stick & sew a rope to - or just tie the stick to the lanyard. No-one will be able to tell if they are not aboard.

Have a great time, just remember that Wales has been an occupied country for 700 odd years & the English have not been nice "Occupiers". There are good reasons for bad feeling, but it is seldom shown. Their forbearance of arrogant visitors amazes me, and if you are polite & respectful, you will mostly be treated very well. Better than you might in Blackpool, Bridlington or Brighton in fact.

In a certain mini-market in N Wales my wife was collecting goods for the boat.
As she entered, staff started talking in 'Welsh' rather than English.

My wife, being an American citizen rather than English, (but the locals took her for English) went along with this, and then, at the till, asked for the bill, and offered to pay, in Gaelic currency.
Fecked!

Ever seen a Welsh sign asking for money in Welsh?
 

Searush

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Now I'm confused. For many people Welsh is their first language - what else would you expect them to speak? :confused:

And what "Gaelic" currency would you offer? Scottish notes with direct parity to English ones? Incidentally, I think you will find that Wales is Celtic country, not a Gaelic one. But you are not anti-Celtic are you? :rolleyes:
 
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