Lost art of sculling

should we have apologised to mr old git

  • yes and groveled for forgivness

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  • nope not likely

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Channel Ribs

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Our inboard conked out in the aproach to Chichester Marina in Winter, we sculler her the whole way to the lock and into position inside the lock. 22' is by far the biggest boat I have propelled that way. /forums/images/graemlins/smile.gif

Very satisfying.
 

Lakesailor

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Steve Goacher (sailmaker and 10 times national Sonata champ) moves his boat about by sculling with the rudder. They stand astride the cockpit and set a rolling motion going then use the rudder to capitalise on the movement.
I don't know if it's common practice, but very impressive when you see it the first time. Pretty efficient too, although you need a fairly tender boat to get the motion going.
 

graham

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[ QUOTE ]
Very satisfying.

[/ QUOTE ]

I sculled our 22 ftr about a mile to the locks when the outboard gave up in not a breath of wind.Yes it was satsfying to get in unaided but had I blistered hands and aching arms by the time i arrived.

As I row or scull the tender several times a week I thought it would be easy ,wrong again /forums/images/graemlins/laugh.gif
 

Lakesailor

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Article Here Complete with diagrams.

scull3.jpg
 

fisherman

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Sculling is still used in ports like Porthleven and St Ives, a hangover from the days when there was not enough room between the moored boats for oars. Anyone here use Randan?
 

old_salt

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My ancient books say:-

1. Scull.
The name given to a light oar as used in a dinghy, particularly of a size which can be pulled by a single rower with one in each hand.

2. Scull to.
In its original meaning, give a small boat headway by working a single oar to and fro over the stern of the boat, but this definition has now been extended to embrace one man working a pair of sculls in a dinghy or other light boat.

scan0001-3.jpg


3. Then there is a Sweep.
A long heavy oar carried in sailing vessels for use when the wind failed. Until the general use of auxiliary engines, Smacks, Barges and sailing Yachts used to carry at least one sweep on board.

4. An other is the Yuloh.
A form of long oar or sweep used by Chinese boatmen over the stern to propel sampans and the smaller junks. It is usually made in two parts, either scarfed and pegged or lashed together, giving the yuloh a distinct bow which causes the blade to be very whippy or flexible. It is mounted loosely over a peg on the boat's Stern, and the forward or inboard end is attached to the deck by a length of line, allowing the end to be roughly waist high, while the outboard end with the blade enters the water at an angle of about 30 degrees. By alternately pushing and pulling the inboard end of the yuloh athwartships the sampan man or girl causes the blade to flex from side to side in the water with a fish's tail or sculling action, and so drives the sampan forward.

Phuooo that's a lot of side to side action I hope it all makes sense..
 

oldfrank

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I think it's compulsory to carry a scull on a sailing boat less than 30' in France - certainly French Dragons carry them and they push them along very quickly.

It's also possible to scull with a single oar over the bow of a dinghy with a similar movement. Useful in confined spaces - and you get to look where you're going! Old Frank
 
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