Lazy jacks or stack pack?

DennisF

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I'm going to convert my roller reefing boom to slab reefing, and will also be getting lazy jacks fitted to make singlehanding a bit easier. I am debating whether to also go for a stack pack, but the extra cost is around £650. My mainsail cover has been repaired several times and is only likely to last another few seasons.

So, is the stack pack worth the candle, or am I better off just replacing the mainsail cover when it is time?
 

PuffTheMagicDragon

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Stack pack is the way to go, even if you do not sail single-handed like I do. I made one myself for my previous boat and will do the same for the present one, probably next year. If you have access to a good sewing machine and can put it to good use, it is not such a big deal.
 

Twister_Ken

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A couple of factors...

How big is the boat? If you can master flaking the main easily, don't bother with the extra expense of a stack pack. OTOH if it's a real struggle, get the stack pack.

How long do you spend on a trip? I can put up with a stack pack flapping around for a few hours, but not for much longer.
 

prv

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If well designed and made it doesn't need to flap; mine didn't and it was all my own work.

Mine doesn't flap, but I don't really care for the look of it. On a longer leg, if I can be bothered, I slack away the lazy jacks and roll the stackpack into a thin roll on top of the boom.

Pete
 

Stemar

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For single handing, a stackpack is great. Head to wind, let go the halyard and it all comes tumbling down.

Well, almost. I've found a downhaul a useful addition. It allows me to get the last metre or so of sail down from the cockpit. Jamming it off and taking up the slack on the halyard means the sail isn't tempted to raise itself in a gust and the halyard hasn't found a cleat to wrap itself round when you want to raise the main again.
 

25931

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For single handing, a stackpack is great. Head to wind, let go the halyard and it all comes tumbling down.

Well, almost. I've found a downhaul a useful addition. It allows me to get the last metre or so of sail down from the cockpit. Jamming it off and taking up the slack on the halyard means the sail isn't tempted to raise itself in a gust and the halyard hasn't found a cleat to wrap itself round when you want to raise the main again.
I agree and reefing is easier too.
An extra £650 must be for a rather large yacht.
 
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DennisF

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A couple of factors...

How big is the boat? If you can master flaking the main easily, don't bother with the extra expense of a stack pack. OTOH if it's a real struggle, get the stack pack.

How long do you spend on a trip? I can put up with a stack pack flapping around for a few hours, but not for much longer.

My boat is a Westerly Berwick, a 31ft bilge keeler. Sailing trips vary, but usually out for most of the day, anchoring or mooring somewhere for the evening. Don't tend to sail overnight as when I have crew it is usually the family.
 

Giblets

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Our sailmaker has just quoted us £150 per metre measured from front of mast to aft end of boom for a new stack pack to include longitudinal battens, full length top zip and 2 x shorter side zips (don't know what they are for but the existing one has them), eyes for lazy jacks and a gooseneck/mast removable cover. Moody 31 Mk 2 so 4m give or take a few cm.
 
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DennisF

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Our sailmaker has just quoted us £150 per metre measured from front of mast to aft end of boom for a new stack pack to include longitudinal battens, full length top zip and 2 x shorter side zips (don't know what they are for but the existing one has them), eyes for lazy jacks and a gooseneck/mast removable cover. Moody 31 Mk 2 so 4m give or take a few cm.

Hmm. My Westerly Berwick has a boom length of only just over 3m (10ft)......
 

Poignard

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I fitted lazy jacks not long ago and they are a great help when approaching a port single-handed. Just drop the sail and pass a tyer round it, then nip back to the cockpit.

But don't have them too thin and stretchy, like mine are. I used 4mm rope but 5mm or 6mm would be better
 

laika

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YMMV but a stack pack doesn't completely absolve you of the need to flake the sail. I still have to, but then my sail is pretty new too. What it does give you is (a) the option to conceal a rather poorly flaked mail when skulking into harbour after a long hard day, (b) slightly better taming of the hastily dropped sail than lazyjacks alone but for me most importantly (c), 1 minute of sliding over a zip rather than 10 minutes wrestling with the sail cover and bungy cords. Those minutes add up if you sail a lot and are sometimes critical when heading to the bar to catch last orders or pouring a beverage to enjoy with the last rays of the setting sun
 

Topcat47

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I've got a Stackpack, The advantage is that it'd a doddle to zip the main in the sail cover, whereas, if you have lazyjacks alone they need to be tidied away before you fit a sail cover. I"m ** and anything that makes life easier id fine by me.
 

Poignard

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I've got a Stackpack, The advantage is that it'd a doddle to zip the main in the sail cover, whereas, if you have lazyjacks alone they need to be tidied away before you fit a sail cover. I"m ** and anything that makes life easier id fine by me.

That's true, unless you pull the lazy jacks forward to the mast when you've finished with them. Then they're not in the way to catch battens next time you hoist the main
 

DennisF

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So the general view is to go for the stack pack. What about the price of £650 for a 10ft boom. Is that a fair price or am I being taken for a ride?
 

RivalRedwing

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So the general view is to go for the stack pack. What about the price of £650 for a 10ft boom. Is that a fair price or am I being taken for a ride?
Your location might help.. I just purchased a stack pack and lazy jacks from Wilkinson Sails (Faversham, N Kent) for a shade under £500 inc VAT for a Rival 34, I don't have the boom measurement but can't believe it is that different. I am sure that someone will say that not all stack packs are the same but this one seems fine to me.
 
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