kill cord

ufans

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I have a Hardy 20 Pilot, the engine remote includes a kill switch, so the question is would
You use it on this type of boat?
 

ontheplane

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If single handed yes, perhaps, but probably only if it were rough etc etc....

I agree it's a bit unnecessary on a calm day, good weather etc.
 

GrahamHR

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IThe marine industry is very cynical with their approach. to safety.

I always used the kill cord when I had V8 petrol cuddies. Why they never came with two cords I will never understand apart from it' saves money ( driver overboard with the kill cord attached , how to restart the engine/ pick them up?).

Even more bizarre, boats with petrol engines supplied with kill cords, yet the same boat with more powerful diesel engines and actually faster don't have them ! ( guess why; more expensive by about £30 or less per engine at OEM prices)
 
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BruceK

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The chances of being highsided out the helmsman chair or flipping the boat in a smaller petrol powered vessel are considerably higher than in a large diesel express cruiser. On mine the warning comes at 40 knots not to hard lock the steering. As I cant reach those speeds its superfluous. I'd also need to be tossed in excess of 10 feet with a clearance of 4 to fall out the boat. In my 20 foot cuddy I had 3 feet of freeboard. Very easy to be knocked overboard.
 

mm42

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You can get a webbing strap with D ring off ebay for about £3, slip it over your belt and you've got the benefit of a kill cord without it annoying you round your leg. I use them on the rescue boat I'm coxswain of, it means I can stand up to helm if I need better visibility.
 

ufans

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Thank you for all your advice and comments. mm42, I will be getting a belt loop. :)
 

GrahamHR

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It's not just about being thrown overboard. My 9 m or so diesel powered sportscruiser can gemerate some pretty high, shockingly high lateral forces in a turn at 35 knots. High enough that I or anyone else helming it could be thrown across the cockpit potentially with head impact. The exact same boat with petrol engines all have kill cord.s My diesel powered one does, or rather did, not have one. The diesel kill cord switch is more expensive than the petrol kill cord switch. Do they fit them to petrol powered boats for the fun of it, or do VP USA, the supplier of petrol units not even consider supplying a shift assembly without a kill cord switch, whereas VP Europe, the diesel sourcing point, think they are a waste of time and money ?
 
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salar

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Safety is the owner's responsibility. That is why we buy and fit flare packs, hand held VHF, medical kits, extra fire extinguishers, life jackets etc. and don't rely on manufacturers to supply everything that could keep us safe. Any boat, straight from the manufacturer, could not be relied on to have all the safety equipment on board that we might need. I see nothing wrong in the owner choosing to fit a kill cord or safety harness.
 

scottie

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Despite all their shortcomings you can blame not VP for this one mechanical controls for inboards are not usually engine related Outboard yes
 

GrahamHR

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Sorry, I'm afraid I can blame them.
.
VP supplied early EVC diesel units with an awful shift lever; no detent to manually operate, to prevent accidental gear / full throttle selection, no kill cord. As in my 2008 built boat, when the next generation was available at an extra price.

The second generation was better, with a detent; but still no kill cord as standard ( a very easy plug and play fit).

Next generation had a kill cord as standard, so I suppose they were learning.

Looked at in context, VP USA engined sportscruiser boats have had kill cords as standard since what, 1990, some 20 years before VP Europe fitted them as standard?
 
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scottie

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Re read my post please
My comments referred to mechanical controls
I believe that U.S. Coast guards regulations may have have a lot to do with this as they were /are the regulating authority and boat builders fit the controls that suit them
EVC started on larger engines and worked down in size so kill cord may not have been a requirement initially I also think that VP offered kill cords as an option pre EVC so again down to boatbuilder / owner choice.
 
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