Is it hard ?

jfm

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practical or theory?

So far as I know, everyone passes at this level. Has anyone, or does anyone know anyone, who's failed That's not a criticism of RYA or instructors, it's just that those who struggle tend to drop out of the course partway through and those who have no hope of passing don't like boating to begin with so they don't even enrol, and the examiners tend to let marginal candidates through. In other words, you'll walk it.

I think the syllabus needs major update. They should teach the basics but also there needs to be more coverage of electronic nav. If time is limited then cut out all that crap like what do these lights mean, oh it's a fishing vessel not trawling underway not making way nets on the port side and towing something but under 200m, port aspect. I mean if it's a boat and you can see its lights you're going to avoid hitting it

JFM
 
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Ooh, but wouldn't you like to know what it was you didn't hit? Isn't there an 'I Spy book of nav lights'?
 
G

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Re: Fnarr

There's a website called yachtmaster.co.uk which tells a bit about it. There's five days on a boat followed (surely not immediately?) by an exam.

The lights questions are my favourite. The more complicated ones are often "Brighton" or "Blackpool". I think that it will impress the examiner if you hazard a guess at the actual boat name itself too. Also, for the knots, you can play for time by asking "Do you mean a Chinese one?"
 

byron

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there certainly is a book of I spy lights and fings, most professional Master Mariners use it because by the time you have learned ALL of them its time to retire anyway

©2001
 
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if you want hard try sitting a MCA officer of the watch oral exam!!
then we will see if any one wants to complain about rya being to easy.
i am all for everyone in a boat to have some level of eduction (not compulsory!)
even if someone fail the final exam, they will still have learn some new skills and knowledge. Boating is my hobbie i want it to be fun, as long as safety is a persons first consideration then i am happy.but lets not focus to much on bits of paper please. As a degree in nautical science will not get you home in bad weather!
 

ChrisP

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Did my theory a couple of years ago on the Cruisind Asc. compressed course 4 weekends with masses of home work. It's like all exams if you do the work you'll get through. Still got most of the books that you need. We'll talk at the weekend.
 
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Re: ah yes I-Spy navigation lights

It's a red hardback A4 book, costs £5. No wait, it's a blue A5 book costs £4 erm...
 

suzanne

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Pauline, us women will breeze through the yachtmaster, especially US women. You have to remember as my mum taught me in life, what men find hard is usually easy and what they find easy is usually designed for 3 years and up. Don't think she was referring to my dad?

Suzanne xXx
 
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Pauline, I did mine a few years back. The Coastal Skipper/Yachtmaster theory course was grindingly boring - I did mine by correspondence thru' NMCS (see ad in back of MBY) and, at that time at least, it was aimed more at yotties than stinkies and made little or no reference to electronic navaids
Having completed the theory, you then have the option to take the Practical Exam for either Coastal Skipper or Yachtmaster providing you can demonstrate a minimum number of hours skippering a boat - both day and night. I hired an Instructor for 3 days to get me upto speed; during this time, the Instructor should tell you whether you're good enough for Yachtmaster or Coastal Skipper or whether you're a complete tosser and should stick to gardening
I have to say the day of the Exam was one of the most nerve wracking days of my life. You get given beforehand a series of waypoints to plot a route and you have to do all your tidal/leeway calcs as well. You pick up the Examiner in the morning and the Exam goes on all day and some of the night. You navigate the route and, all the time, the bastard's firing stupid questions at you about lights and shapes, ColRegs etc, throwing fenders overboard for MOB and then he'll change the route just to be difficult. I was advised to allow a competent crew member to actually helm the boat under my instruction, except for mooring, which is a very good idea because you have so much else to think about
The ordeal went on from 10 in the morning until 8 at night except for brief stops for cuppas and meals - good idea to lay on a decent spread. Anyway, I passed for Yachtmaster
Dont let anyone tell you that everyone passes; my Instructor reckoned 1 in 3 fail and, in any case, you'll get told whether you're not good enough during the instruction and you wont get put forward for the Exam
Was it worth it? Maybe not, because a few hundred hours skippering experience should teach you everything you need to know for most practical purposes. Yes, because you will learn a lot and, in any case, your insurance company should give you 10% off your premiums!
 

david_bagshaw

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Mine was very similar to Deleted User , We had been boating since the early seventies & the Dutch Gov Introduced the need for certification, for vessels of our size, so Dad suggested I did YM, as I did not fancy doing Varbewise in Dutch!!

Would recommend a week course( did mine at Peters chichester, as Resolution was laid up at the time) prior to the exam to get you into the examiners mind set.

The exam it self was as Mike f says, continual I want to go there etc, lights, & tides, working out the heights at totally un related ports. Perhaps the real thing the E is after is compitance, really knowing what is going around you, to the Horizon.

Keep your wits about as at any moment he might ask you to mark on the chart where you think you are, without bearings etc, then allow you to take the above then discuss the difference!!

Above all enjoy it & defiantly better than passing the road tests!!!


David ps Take a look at my site www.yachtman.co.uk
 
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