First aid kit

AIDY

Active member
Joined
19 Jan 2004
Messages
7,763
Location
Muckle Flugga
Any recommendations for a basic first aid kit. Nothing too complicated, but enough contents for the average person to use.
 

Binman

New member
Joined
10 Oct 2014
Messages
802
Location
Chatham
Depends if you are single handed ,or two or more, or family, Most kits have stuff in you will never use. When I worked on site with 20 operatives, the main thing used was individual eye wash, plasters and sticky surgical tape, finger stalls, scissors, some bandages, one sling, latex gloves,safety pins, non stick dressings for burns, no creams apart from sun cream. You could go on and on, have a look on line, to a point it would depend how far off shore you are, if you need to summon help.include pain killers if needed.
 

Twister_Ken

Well-known member
Joined
31 May 2001
Messages
27,585
Location
'ang on a mo, I'll just take some bearings
Worth doing the RYA first aid course. Then you'll find out what sorts of things you need. As a general comment, a ready-made first aid kit is unlikely to contain everything, and may have too many of some items. Regard a ready-made kit as the starting point, then supplement it as necessary. And include some rehydration sachets and industrial strength sunburn ointments. Sea-sickness and sunburn are the most likely medical emergencies you'll encounter at sea unless you're particularly accident prone.
 
Last edited:

Alpha22

Active member
Joined
22 Sep 2003
Messages
1,400
Location
Cambridgeshire
I find a good starting point is an H&S approved 10 person kit. It gives you all the basics for a major incident, Bandages and the like. If not much else, You get a decent box to keep it all in!!.
It is worth double bagging the contents. Much of it will be useless if it gets a soaking. Some Vaseline on the scissors too!!!

For boating there are a few things that can be added to make it more useful..... pain killers, sea sickness tablets, antihistamines, a good box of plasters and tape. For longer distance cruising, think about an emergency dental kit and something like Dioralite for rehydration after sickness. You or your crew may have some personal needs. I often cruise with a diabetic, so there are a few glucose tablets in my kit.

One of the fundamentals of First Aid, is it is only the emergency aid you would provide initially in the case of an incident to sustain life until help arrives. To do that you generally don't need anything that is in a first aid kit.
Whilst offshore we don't have immediate access to the ambulance service so we are in the position of not only providing the initial emergency first aid, but also continuing care..... that's where the contents of your kit become useful.
 
Last edited:

PaulMcC

New member
Joined
16 Apr 2013
Messages
178
Location
Hampshire
Most people selling already made up first aid kits will list the contents. You can then go to a suppliers of first aid kit refills, buy a box and the contents for about the same price, but because the contents come in bulk you end up with a big pile of extra stuff at home which you can use to top up the first aid kit at need.

Mine has , in no particular order:

Vaseline
Elastoplast tape
Plasters (lots of sizes)
Triangular bandage
Trauma bandages (various sizes)
finger dressings
gauze dressings
dressing tape
paracetomol
ibruprofen
eye wask
gloves
anto-diahorrea stuff
rehydration powder
antiseptic wipes
antisecptic cream
seasickness tablets (kalms and stugereon)
pockety mask
safety pins
scissors

All fits in a case roughly 12"x9"x4"

Only stuff I've used so far (touch wood and all that) are seasickness tabs, plasters, mircopore tape and antiseptic wipes. I have used a small trauma bandage when on someone else's boat for a deep cut though.
 

tugger

Active member
Joined
20 Dec 2011
Messages
123
An interesting addition I heard during a first aid course was to add a couple of disposable nappies, If heaven forbid you have to deal with a major bleed, you shouldn't remove and replace dressings rather add one over another (until absolutely necessary to change them), however the more blood you can absorb before this the better... and nappies of course can absorb a lot of ... stuff. (Plus they are packed very tightly when new and don't take up much room for what they can do)

Plus they're surprisingly practical if you get a gash to the head from a wayward boom.
 
Last edited:

PuffTheMagicDragon

Active member
Joined
16 May 2001
Messages
14,406
Also very important is a good book on first aid to help you make good use of whatever is in the kit. Although a copy of "The Ship's Doctor" might seem overkill, it covers practically anything that you may come across; there are many others that are at a lesser level and might be easier to consult, especially if your sailing is mainly short hops. Whichever book you buy, make sure that you become familiar with its contents before you really need to use it. If you need medical assistance over the radio, e.g., when offshore, advice will be given with reference to whichever book you have on board.
 

DD87

New member
Joined
6 Jul 2015
Messages
2
In addition to standard large first aid kits the single biggest lifesaver for a first aider of any ability is an automated external defibrillator. They are VERY easy to use and you can pick one up for under £1000. Hopefully it would never need to be used but if you ever did need it, you'll be glad you spent the money!!

I 100% agree with the glucose tablets above. Antihistamines are near essential (chlorphenamine is what I would carry). Another nice to have is a salbutamol inhaler.

All depends on how much you want to learn and how much you want to spend.
 

PuffTheMagicDragon

Active member
Joined
16 May 2001
Messages
14,406
With the RYA course you get the St John's Ambulance book. Less than brilliant, and not boaty specific.

http://www.stjohnsupplies.co.uk/products/Publications/First-aid/First-Aid-Manual-10th-edition

I am not familiar with the RYA or its courses. The book in your link seems to be a good entry level publication, even if it may just cover the basics. The point that I was trying to make is that simply buying 'a kit' without knowing how to put it to good use would not be very meaningful.
 

old_salt

Active member
Joined
8 Dec 2005
Messages
7,237
Location
Cheshire, England.
"Reeds"!
It even used to instruct on child berth not too sure if it still does. :D
My last Reeds is 1980 kept in the office and good for the occasional reference.:nonchalance:
 

PuffTheMagicDragon

Active member
Joined
16 May 2001
Messages
14,406
With the RYA course you get the St John's Ambulance book. Less than brilliant, and not boaty specific.

http://www.stjohnsupplies.co.uk/products/Publications/First-aid/First-Aid-Manual-10th-edition

Following on from this thread, I thought I might as well get a copy of that book. It was advertised as being half-price and zero-VAT rated.
On the spur of the moment I figured that, at that price, I couldn't go wrong...

This morning I received the book...

"Nett Total: .....GBP 4.75
Carriage: ..........GBP 16.12
VAT: ................... GBP 3.22
Total: ............ GBP 24.09"



In my view, the only comment that I can think of as being appropriate would be "What a rip-off!"

Am I alone to think this?
 

William_H

Well-known member
Joined
28 Jul 2003
Messages
13,589
Location
West Australia
You may want to carry a first aid kit to show due diligence as a boats captain/ owner. As such to comply with one of the published lists as requirement for RYA for instance would have merit.
Here is a copy of our club compliance document for night races (*sheltered water) including first aid kit requirement. Of course as you should add whatever you need for yourself or passengers.
https://drive.google.com/folderview...&usp=sharing&tid=0BzJ65zhDotGKNVl5aEJxMWxMaEk
look at Cat 5 or Cat6/7 PDFs good luck olewill
 

ghostlymoron

Well-known member
Joined
9 Apr 2005
Messages
9,889
Location
Shropshire
You often see used copies of the red cross first aid manual on eBay and Amazon quite cheaply. Some details of CPR change in different editions. I wouldn't bother with a defib, the chances of resuscitating are quite small despite what you see on 'casualty'.
I used to be a trained first aider on construction sites but never had anything more serious than a scratch from re-bar. If you are just doing coastal cruising, a basic kit is quite adequate, cuts, if you're blue watering, you need to be equipped for every eventuality, stitching etc.
Basic kits don't contain scissors or safety pins I believe.
 
I use this list as a starting point (look at the Class A Race list).

http://www.classemini.com/modules/kameleon/upload/2015_-_OFFICIAL_TEXTS_-_APPENDIX_E.pdf

My preferred way of storing the kit is to put groups of things - that you might use together - in zip lock bags. Suck the air out with a straw. Then put the bags in one or two large tupperware boxes for further wet-proofing and protection.
+1. with a label on, identifying general use e.g. "Burns", "Blood Wounds", etc and listing the contents of each bag so that they can be replenished when used. Dont forget to include a CPR mask.
I would also agree with the suggestion that you take a course. A First Aid qualification is mandatory for sailing instructors (in Ireland and France, anyhow) and would be an asset to any skipper who intends offshore or extended passages. Such knowledge, on your part, might save a crew member's life.
 

Roberto

Well-known member
Joined
20 Jul 2001
Messages
4,998
Location
Lorient/Paris
If you need medical assistance over the radio, e.g., when offshore, advice will be given with reference to whichever book you have on board.

+1
on one transat we emailed CIRM (center for radio medical advice) because my wife was not well, we indicated what the symptoms were according to the MCGA ships medical book, and that we had the "unlimited' boat medical kit prescribed by French regulations.
All very useful, even once in 10 years..
 

Seajet

...
Joined
23 Sep 2010
Messages
29,178
Location
West Sussex / Hants
I would add ' Dioralyte ' sachets for replenishing blood minerals / salts etc after prolonged seasickness, add to water, pleasant tasting, from chemists about £4,50 for 4 sachets, I'd take 8 at least in case crew suffer.

Mineral water bottles with teats to suck on are brilliant for sufferers; maybe take a large mineral water can to top them up as there might be a lot of spewed wastage...

Glucose tablets help on watch.

Savlon dry spray for minor cooker burns.
 

Gwylan

Well-known member
Joined
31 May 2007
Messages
3,651
Location
Moved ashore
Following on from this thread, I thought I might as well get a copy of that book. It was advertised as being half-price and zero-VAT rated.
On the spur of the moment I figured that, at that price, I couldn't go wrong...

This morning I received the book...

"Nett Total: .....GBP 4.75
Carriage: ..........GBP 16.12
VAT: ................... GBP 3.22
Total: ............ GBP 24.09"



In my view, the only comment that I can think of as being appropriate would be "What a rip-off!"

Am I alone to think this?

Never worth thatmuch. Not a book I would choose. Did the St J A course - bit pathetic and not too rlevant. Instructor seemed toassume that we would be waiting the 15 mins until an ambulance arrived. Seemed surprised that we had the cheek to think we could do anything for a causalty in the couple of hours or more it might take for 'assistance' to arrive.
Got the certificate, so RYA are happy. Anyone injured whilst traveling with me might be underwhelmed at the prospect me being their best hope for staying alive until a professional arrived.
 

Other threads that may be of interest

Top