Cabin insulation

boatone

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Well, its become pretty obvious that the Princess 32 needs some cabin top and sides insulation to cut down on condensation and, also presumably will help keep noise down if heavy rain outside. Has anyone tackled this job? Thinking of sticking rockwool or polystyrene sheet direct to moulding before covering with vynil fabric etc. Also foredeck hatch which is glass in ally frame positively drips condensation and wondering if a 'plug' for winter might be a good idea? Interesting that didnt have these problems with previous boat - norman 32 - cos double skin construction cabin top so much better insulated.

TonyR
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Personally I would use polystyrene sheet they use it in modern day caravans now, it will be less messy than rockwool and kinder to the lungs when applying.

Paul js.
 

eddieperkins

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Tony,
A work of caution, polystyrene attacks the insulation on some wiring and can cause it to break down with a fire being a posible outcome. Ensure any wiring is not in contact with it if you choose to go that way, using plastic conduit should do the trick. An alternative could be the foam backed headlining commonly available, dont know how well it insulates but I used some on a Project 31 with excellent results.
Good luck,
Eddie
 

BarryH

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I've seen foam sandwhich, used to good effect, the stuff you buy in builders merchants with the silver foil on both sides. Its good if you have flat surfaces as you can cut each panel in one piece. Also with the foil its easier to adhere the finish covering material to it,

Regards BarryH :cool:
 

ToMo

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This might sound a bit daft, but I've used cork tiles (bathroom type) on my previous boat and it worked very well exellent insulation and looked pretty good too! You can get various shades of it, and I found it very easy to use.....another bonus is that now its very cheap because many of the DIY stores have got sales on
TôMö
 

eddieperkins

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Tony,
The forehatch on the project was grp sandwich construction so no specific problem with it. Condensation in general was a problem at the extremities of the season when the night air was a bit chilly though, especially with the windows. We just sort of tollerated it. If you have gas heating it makes matters worse as burning gas gives off a lot of moisture into the air. I now have a Sealine 30 lined out with a hessian type material and do not have a problem with condensation, except with the windows at the extremities of the season etc etc. I think one inch of foam will cerainly do the job if it does no encroach on your headroom but is probably overkill. You can get thin polystyrene on a roll for lining kitchens etc before papering, its about 5mm thick I think and should be quite adequate for this , especially if you are the fixing vinyl covered panels over the top, but if you have the room 1" will do a better job.
Regards,
Eddie
 

boatone

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Thanks Eddie,
there seems to be plenty of room between the (now)stretched vynil headlining and the roof moulding - certainly enough to take 1" polystyrene and I figure it will be much easier to handle sticking up the sheet material as its rigid and should adhere well with something like Sikkaflex. MIght even try doing this and just restretching the fabric into place and see how it goes. Also very aware of how noisy rain can be on a thin roof (esp when trying to sleep) and figure the thicker the better, after all its cheap enough.


TonyR
boatone@boatsontheweb.com
 
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