Shore Power Cable Coil

RunAgroundHard

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I will be using a longer shore power cable than normal and as such there will be some loops of cable to keep it tidy when plugged in. I have a consumer unit with an RCD and MCBs, professionally wired up. No big power consumers, except occasional use of a fan heater, immersion heater, 24V/30A Sterling battery charger, fridge. All could be on at the same time.

My questions are:-

1. Is this a big issue, coiled up?
2. Is there a way of coiling such as figure of eight, or just flaking and bunching up securely with a sail tie, if it is a big issue?

I assume if it is a significant issue, I will just flake all the cable out on deck. Curious, not sure about this at all.

Thanks. RAH
 

Boathook

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I will be using a longer shore power cable than normal and as such there will be some loops of cable to keep it tidy when plugged in. I have a consumer unit with an RCD and MCBs, professionally wired up. No big power consumers, except occasional use of a fan heater, immersion heater, 24V/30A Sterling battery charger, fridge. All could be on at the same time.

My questions are:-

1. Is this a big issue, coiled up?
2. Is there a way of coiling such as figure of eight, or just flaking and bunching up securely with a sail tie, if it is a big issue?

I assume if it is a significant issue, I will just flake all the cable out on deck. Curious, not sure about this at all.

Thanks. RAH
I suspect if loosely coiled and not to much, not a problem. Tightly coiled could cause overheating.

What is loosely or tightly coiled, etc Could be another thread.
 

MontyMariner

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If you have to coil, a long F of 8 is the way to do it.
I don't know how long you call long, but if it's long enough, you could always chop a one and a half to two boat lengths off and buy a M and F connector to make off the ends. You will then have two of different lengths, and joined you will still have the long one.
 

KevinV

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Absolutely no issue coiled or otherwise
If only all questions on here could be answered so unequivocally!

It would of course be even better if the answer was right, but I guess induction is just made up?

You can't possibly know if it's an issue without knowing the actual load, the length of cable and the size (therefore number of) and tightness of the proposed loops. Both fan and immersion heater are potentially big constant loads - an absolute no-no for coiled cables - as anyone who knows anything knows. That's without even considering the folly of creating a ruddy great electro-magnet on a boat.
 

wonkywinch

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Many people don't know you should pull out all the cable on those vacuum cleaners with an internal drum as the cable will heat up enough to melt the outer sheath and stick the lot together. For shore power as long as the coiled cable isn't at the bottom of a locker with a load of lines piled up on top, then it should be OK. My preference was for separate leads for our home berth and a long one in case we're bows in anywhere.
 

Refueler

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Many people don't know you should pull out all the cable on those vacuum cleaners with an internal drum as the cable will heat up enough to melt the outer sheath and stick the lot together. For shore power as long as the coiled cable isn't at the bottom of a locker with a load of lines piled up on top, then it should be OK. My preference was for separate leads for our home berth and a long one in case we're bows in anywhere.

Exactly .....

I have basically two cables - a long one for those long runs and a short one for others ... can be joined to each other for extreme cases. I also have short adaptor cables about 30cms long that have other plugs to cater for those locations where the typical blue socket is not provided.
 

Refueler

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If only all questions on here could be answered so unequivocally!

It would of course be even better if the answer was right, but I guess induction is just made up?

You can't possibly know if it's an issue without knowing the actual load, the length of cable and the size (therefore number of) and tightness of the proposed loops. Both fan and immersion heater are potentially big constant loads - an absolute no-no for coiled cables - as anyone who knows anything knows. That's without even considering the folly of creating a ruddy great electro-magnet on a boat.

Bit of a 'dramatic' reply ?

Given that majority of marina electrics are limited to 16A anyway - it would have to be a pretty serious set of coils to have any real effect. As long as the coils are loose on deck / or neat by the pontoon power outlet- there should be no problem.
 

wingcommander

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I will be using a longer shore power cable than normal and as such there will be some loops of cable to keep it tidy when plugged in. I have a consumer unit with an RCD and MCBs, professionally wired up. No big power consumers, except occasional use of a fan heater, immersion heater, 24V/30A Sterling battery charger, fridge.
Wot!,,, No kettle?
 

wingcommander

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My shoreline setup is similar. I do hook my remaining coil over a winch, and the lower end hangs close to my compass. Often wondered if the temp magnetic field ime making wound have any long term effects..
The cable can feel warm to touch when disconnecting. Coils nice n easy also 👌
 

Mister E

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I have the same problem with the electric cable for the boat.
My plan is to measure the cable to get the correct length and cut the cable. Then put the correct socket on the short length for the mooring and a plug on the longer length so the that can be used if needed elsewhere.
Plug and socket available at Screwfix ans so on.

Ps disconnect before cutting the cable.
 

Refueler

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Possibly - the unequivocal "it'll be fine" got my goat. Doesn't make coiling cables a good idea though.


I agree that coiling can lead to some dire consequences - but with usual cables used and marina's only supplying a max of 16A before breaker goes ... the chances of coils being a problem are near zero ... unless as another says - buried under loads of cr** and no air movement round them. Even then the load is not so great on such cables ... unless of course own made with lighter cable.
 

reallycoliholic

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We were in a caravan site recently and the site manager knocked on our day saying it's "the law" to unwind our cable , I started to argue and his reply was that's what the caravan and Motorhome club insist on and if I didn't unwind the reel he'd disconnect the supply. SWMBO reminded me that for once could I just shut up and do as asked. She won.
 

mrangry

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If only all questions on here could be answered so unequivocally!

It would of course be even better if the answer was right, but I guess induction is just made up?

You can't possibly know if it's an issue without knowing the actual load, the length of cable and the size (therefore number of) and tightness of the proposed loops. Both fan and immersion heater are potentially big constant loads - an absolute no-no for coiled cables - as anyone who knows anything knows. That's without even considering the folly of creating a ruddy great electro-magnet on a boat.
We do know the load as it will be max 16a, and yes we dont know the length but guess its not a cruise ship.

The issue with cables overheating on coiled drums is that the inner cables are unable to cool and as the insulation heats and deforms it seals futher any possible air entry to allow cooling. As the conductors increase in temperature there will also be increased resistance which in turn will produce more heat.

This has nothing to do with induction as we have a feed and return within the cable.
 
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Make un-coiled your default, that way, the worst can happen is you blow the fuse due to overloading, and not cause a fire by not un-coiling.

Extension drums usually have to values Un coiled 13 amps, coiled 6 amps just a example.
 
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