Seized stainless steel turnbuckle!?

trevorr

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A couple of friends indeed had to use an angle grinder to cut the turnbuckles, and after having tried all sorts of potions, heat, etc.
I use Lanocote when first mounting them. it works very well they can be screwed or unscrewed even several years later.

Looking at the picture, they look identical to mine: can you see "ACMO" engraved on the turnbuckle body, or in tangs? If so they are most likely stainless steel. Open cage bronze ones from Selden etc have a slightly different shape.
I'm 99% certain that it's a Sta-Lok Turnbuckle. Well atleast the other one in view is, as you can see the orange dot on it.
In which case its a Bronze alloy.
 

KompetentKrew

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Thanks to everyone who replied - all sorted now.

Correct application of adjustables, property and correctly against the flats, and getting a good angle on them, and it did move. Unwinding was slow and stiff - I shall know better for next time.

I agree with the comments that they're likely bronze, although TBH I think this is more obvious in the original pic if viewed on a laptop than it is in real life.

I appreciate all replies.
 

William_H

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Thanks to everyone who replied - all sorted now.

Correct application of adjustables, property and correctly against the flats, and getting a good angle on them, and it did move. Unwinding was slow and stiff - I shall know better for next time.

I agree with the comments that they're likely bronze, although TBH I think this is more obvious in the original pic if viewed on a laptop than it is in real life.

I appreciate all replies.
One of my each winter to do's is to loosen turn buckles and grease. Then return to original position. ol'will
 

ean_p

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Ta, any particular kind of grease?
Try lanocoat or something similar if bronze against stainless or bronze......if stainless on stainless then something like this.....https://www.cromwell.co.uk/shop/lubricants-and-chemicals/lubricants/anti-seize-lubricant-tube-85gm/p/ROC7706431H?gad_source=1&gclid=CjwKCAjwoPOwBhAeEiwAJuXRh8rmVOGZpyOqQTJM6Mej-ULIwAiFLa6Wmotmfa3BwOOfig41xWrR7RoC0IkQAvD_BwE
 

KompetentKrew

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IMHO opinion whatever you have, I use axle grease. ol'will
This is indeed my general policy when it comes to grease.

I looked up the pot of magenta stuff that I inherited with the boat and it mentioned being suitable for immersion in water - like the bearings of boat-launching trailers and stuff like that. And copaslip is good for high temperatures. So I rather feel like that is most eventualities covered.
 

Roberto

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Aka lanolin, also base for Lanocote. Also useful in place of duralac or tefgel. I use it on st.steel turnbuckles, but also in all the steel/light alloy assemblies present in the Windpilot, a half of which is often underwater. I also used it to isolate the rigging steel Sparcraft shell terminals from the mast walls, no ill effects several years later. Or galvanised steel shackle pins for anchoring stuff. It solidifies and remains there for years.
 
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