San Lorenzo 88 in port solent

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This rather fab craft is lingering around in Port solent. Not the first stock boat one might have puntedat an unsuspecting bunch of fairlinies in UK sth coast. Has anyone bort it? Or had a go?
 
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Re: as if!

It looks rather beached where it is. Crest marine must have happened across a rather fab credit deal, or accidentally ordered it instead of a 8.8metre Cranchi. If I was MBY, I would hotfoot down there (with tape, beard and clipboard) and get a lash round the solent. Free advertising too eh?
 

jfm

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Re: SL88

Agree MBY should be down there if they were on the ball. Maybe Boat Int territory, not sure where the divide line is these days ( though it's certianly moving up)

Hmmm. I had a look at it on web and I wondered if the brochure boat is actually the one now in Puerto Solent

go to crestmarine.com
click sanlorenzo link
go to range
select SL88

In the pics, the one of the helm station wiv lap top on port side shelf, is that PS in the background?? Not sure, as PS isn't my usual haunt, but looks like it

Must be ordered by a UK customer I suppose?? Or praps it's pottered up here for the August Solent events??

JFM
 

petem

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Re: SL88

It's a stock boat that's been there a while. I wondered if it had come from Southampton Boat Show.

Crest are the SL dealer. I guess they are obliged to order a minimum amout of stock. However, with something that expensive they would get a little assistance (cash) from the factory.

I know someone who's been inside. Reckons the build quality is'nt any better than a Fairline.

Problem is, it's a bit too big for the UK.

And yes, it is PS in the piccies.
 
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Re: \'pon my word Holmes!

Tis indeed Puerto Solente in the background.

I'd take issue with Petem's mate's comparision with UK boats...if we had a chance to have a good poke about. Frinstance, are the door frames all proper wood dovetail joints? And how much silicone is used to gob up around the grp? An easy test of engineering spec/diligence is a spot check of the number of amateur-style slot head screws around the place, whereas proper engineering dictates crosshead. How easy to replace chunks of window/wood, or have they all been stuck down cheapy sunseeeker fashion? How marinised is the outside helm stuff? Does the saloon/galley accomodate a spontaneously exploding cafetiere test? Is the carpet a Bit Poxy? How real is the teak? How easy is it to move about the place, including my special "break into a run" test - all boats would be great if you could run to the bows, but usually you can't even walk quickly. And on a big boat, how many Nice Places For A Sit Down are there? Where's the RIB, and does it have to be craned down? If miles away, is other space available for dive/swim gear? Can it have a small motorbike/scooter onit?
 

martin

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Re: \'pon my word Holmes!

s'nice to know that your out there thinkin up requirements I hadn't even thought of yet.. a run to the bow.eh..your right of cors. Can think of many times this wud have saved valuable swearing and resulted in much more satisactory clip round ear of stupid crew.... mind you perhaps not so good in the long run as wud probly turn mutinous by end of summer.
 
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Re: SL88

Why is the SL88 too big for uk waters?? There are plenty of marinas big enough to take the SL88, and larger craft.
 
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Re: \'pon my word Holmes!

I'm not sure I can accept the phrase 'amateur-style' in reference to sloted screws - when used for wood applications the 'traditional' choice is slotted? In fact it's not easy obtaining woodscrews that are crosshead [apart from chipboard screws!] ... but I would agree that crosshead screws [good quality ones] are less likely to allow the screwdriver to jump out or break but if a woodscrew is that tight to turn then the pilot hole [if there is one] hasn't been done properly which will probably cause the wood to split at a later date? I'm not a carpenter btw just using logic? maybe a carpenter/shipwright would care to comment ...
 
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Re: screws

Sort of with you, re tradition and so forth. But most any screw can be crosshead and for a production boat (which we're on about here) assembled by gangs with power drivers, crosshead better.
 
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Re: screws

Mmmm .... not that easy to get brass crosshead screws ... is it? But you have at least given perspective to the discussion by saying 'gangs with power drivers' which sort of illustrates my point about 'amateur-type' as we are not talking about craftsmen here exactly? {No offence if you are one of a gang with a power driver}

BTW - I have a 1973 Coronet Oceanfarer and you are hard pushed to find a screwhead to look at! They were all covered with raised dowels are secretly screwed or glued or jointed. A good example of this boats 'craftmanship' [and I read this elsewhere] is to look inside the cabinets and lockers and the joint quality is the same as the outside - perfect! Whilst I understand your point about production boats and gangs with power drivers I think it is a shame that quality has been sacrificed for speed and efficiency and not apparently to keep the price down but to increase the manufacturers profits! I wonder what some of today's boats will look like in 30 years time?

This is not a knock at you matts but at the industry in general!
 
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Re: knocking boats

The craftsmanship on older boats is great stuff, and I don't mean that whether a boat is good or bad can be evaluated entirely from use of dowels, crossheads, brass etc. and of course slotheads, dowels and crossheads each have their appropriate place. But unless it's a an "Obvious" brass or dowel application, then crossheads are more postive fastener.

I would say that craftsman or not, if you or I fix a boat that's one thing. But if our job is making and screwing together boats or whatever type, then (craftsman or not) we'd use a power driver by about 3 pm on the first day. For the dress parts, there'd be dowels and such too, though.

I spose the word craftsman has been hijacked to mean "slow but exacting old git in white coat selecting veneers like in those jaguar/bentley adverts", and they've all gone. This is sad if you weep and wonder how they used to build beautiful landmark buidlings, or not so sad if you compare (carwise) a rattly 3-year-old bentley or Ferrari or pre-Ford jag with half-working electronics - against a mercedes.

take your popint about the increase profits tho, but that's capitalism, and if there was the option top have working cabinets looking nice outside but not so nice if peering around inside for less loot than the lovely inand out option, then the cheaper option will sell more. Pity.

But sometimes not a pity. Boats should (but don't) have a pre-wired dashboard. In fact, they should be all sealed and stuff too. But most boats at the moment are nankity twiddly wires behind the dash, itself a plank of summink perhaps woodish with the dials screwed up against it like with old cars, and everything rattles and gets wet so you need the access to fix it. Then the japs or whoever turn up with sealed everything, and it all works, and we go ah but see, that's not like a real craftsman is it now?

So I think we are agreed to have some appropriate craftspeople, and craftsmanship, but not too much. If a mechanised method produces a better result (strength, appearnave etc) they should do that.
 
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Re: SL88 bit too big

Well, there's nowhere near as many uk marinas able to take an 88 as there are in the med. At Port solent itself the lock linit is about 100 feet. Big yachts like an sl88 wd spend time at anchor, but a dodgy business in uk with tides and or muddy rivers , loads more options in med, surely?
 
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Re: SL88 bit too big

Sure, there are plenty more marinas in the med for a boat like the 88, but if i had the chance 2 buy an 88' motor yacht, then i would bring her 2 the solent, just 2 show her off!!!!
 

petem

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Re: SL88 bit too big

So would I!

However most of us like to see what the weathers like. If it's nice we'll take the boat out, park up at another marina, go for a walk/pint/meal, etc. In a 30 footer it's hard anough to finding a space. In an 88 footer it'd be near impossible.
 
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Re: Fair enuf....

agree on massive kudos of turning up with 88 at port solent, no question. But the noodles haven't sold it yet! Praps they need you to help them! "Yeah, there not too many berths for this mr customer BUT ... "
 
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Re: Fair enuf....

It is a nice boat, and if i had loads a dosh i would buy a big boat, but like the look of the new Sunseeker yacht 94 instead. But though it could be used in the solent, and be great for entertaining, it would be much better suited in the med, because the average berth size is alot greater than over here!!!!
 

petem

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Re: Fair enuf....

Matt,

I suspect they've never been able to get it through the lock for sea trials!

Imagine the scenario, 10am Saturday morning, low water at springs. Forty minute lock cycle. 50 boats queued to go through the lock.

You call the lock with your 90 footer. He then has a choice. Call you to go through your own or let 12 other boats go through instead.

I think you'll either have to practice a bit of bribery or be prepared for a long wait (probably until about Tuesday)!

Still, when you get through and joey public is lining the side of the lock you'll look a million dollars. Pretty poor value when you've just spent 3 milliion but worth every penny.

I trust you'll be bringing your new vessel up to the Solent for us to admire (and slag you off behind your back)!

Pete
 
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