Repairing a Solid Mahogany Tabletop.

penberth3

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......Plain filler would stand out like the proverbial sore thumb & getting a fair match with pieces spliced in would be difficult as the wood grain is quite striped & would certainly show up.

If the damage is deep I would splice pieces in. It's the traditional method, usually a diamond shape plug, and it's easy to do with a sharp chisel. Unless you look carefully it won't show up, a patch of filler certainly will.
 

fearmhuir

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If the damage is deep I would splice pieces in. It's the traditional method, usually a diamond shape plug, and it's easy to do with a sharp chisel. Unless you look carefully it won't show up, a patch of filler certainly will.
If it is solid mahogany, what condition is the underside? Maybe it could be turned over?
 

Hacker

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If the damage is deep I would splice pieces in. It's the traditional method, usually a diamond shape plug, and it's easy to do with a sharp chisel. Unless you look carefully it won't show up, a patch of filler certainly will.
Whilst that is the traditional method; the easy way is to get a Forstner bit and a plug cutter/ hole saw that match exactly. Saves a lot of chiselling.
 

Fr J Hackett

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Whilst that is the traditional method; the easy way is to get a Forstner bit and a plug cutter/ hole saw that match exactly. Saves a lot of chiselling.
The best way is to use a specific router bit set and cut the inlay to match the hole.
 

billskip

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Every gouge tells a story.
Yes, tell my dad that. (Cant he's been gone on a while)...when I was very young I was playing with a dart and pricking the table leg..dad saw the little holes and immediately said woodworm ,chopped it up and burnt it......I never did confess....
 

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The best way is to use a specific router bit set and cut the inlay to match the hole.
It’s another way but not necessarily the easiest. I teach wooden boat restoration and we teach all those, if I need to be quick (and time is money) I know which I will use. If I’m restoring something classic then I use the traditional methods.
 

penberth3

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Whilst that is the traditional method; the easy way is to get a Forstner bit and a plug cutter/ hole saw that match exactly. Saves a lot of chiselling.

No! Wrong! If this is a repair in a table top the last thing you want is a big circular plug. As I said, a diamond shape with the grain will be the least conspicuous.
 

Neeves

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No! Wrong! If this is a repair in a table top the last thing you want is a big circular plug. As I said, a diamond shape with the grain will be the least conspicuous.

'Traditional' furniture is not valued by many, too heavy, too dark. If you have a source, those who clear houses, entrepreneurs selling second hand furniture, you can pick up mahogany, rosewood, teak (oak) furniture very cheaply. When living in the UK I picked up 2 teak bench tops from an old chemistry lab. My father took ownership of the boardroom table, sideboard and 8 chairs, solid oak, from Scottish Dyes, then ICI, in Grangemouth which was being used in the potting shed.

Just think outside the box.

I'd find some under valued furniture and build a new saloon table.

Jonathan
 
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I would leave the dents and gauges. Each one will have its story which you can tell to future dinner guests. In Harrods you can have tables "distressed" by paying extra. They whack them with chains, I believe. I would give the table a couple of coats of traditional varnish so it looks loved and be grateful it was made of solid wood and not a ghastly veneer.
 

Hacker

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No! Wrong! If this is a repair in a table top the last thing you want is a big circular plug. As I said, a diamond shape with the grain will be the least conspicuous.
If you align the grain (as you always should) then a circular repair is no more obvious than any other shape.
 
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