Outboard motor, lightest and quietest?

Molteni

Member
Joined
28 Sep 2013
Messages
174
Location
near Bristol
Visit site
We have an ancient Yamaha 3.5hp outboard. It works very well but is both noisy and heavy, 19kg is a lot to lift down into the dinghy!

It's also more powerful than we need for our small inflatable.

I've always been impressed when a dinghy goes by with a Honda 2.3 outboard - very quiet!

Are there other low powered outboards to consider s/h, quietness and light weight are the main considerations.

Thanks in advance

Mike
 

chriss999

Well-known member
Joined
9 Oct 2012
Messages
5,731
Location
Devon, England
sailing-chinee.com
If the funds are there then electric is the way to go... blissfully quiet & the battery readily splits off which halves the weight and, if you are worried about such things, the epropulsion battery floats (although I have yet to test that!).
That’s certainly the way I’m planning to go for my next one. With quietness and portability in mind. To replace a Honda 2.3 which has been good but which won’t last much longer.
But the price is high.
 

CAPTAIN FANTASTIC

Well-known member
Joined
15 Jul 2009
Messages
3,310
Location
Bristol Channel
Visit site
I had a Honda 2hp (same as 2.3hp) was light and reliable. I now have a Suzuki 2.5 which is equally as light and reliable. The Honda has a clutch instead of gear selector and it is air cooled. The Suzuki has gear selector and it is noticeably more powerful. Some people say that the Honda is more noisy, but the difference is negligible. I like the simplicity of the Honda despite that the carburettor bowl and bolts get rusty, which is highly annoying.
 

Ink

Active member
Joined
28 Nov 2020
Messages
303
Visit site
I have a Honda 2.3.

I've had it for 17 years. In that time it has been twice professionally serviced following a ducking, with one new carb fitted. It looks pretty rusty inside.

It's noisy but in my opinion almost indestructible and seems to go on for ever. Once you get used to the clutch easily manoeuvrable.

Being air cooled you can have it on the pushpit and start it up without needing cooling water.

I would take some persuading not to buy another.

Regards
Ink
 

pvb

Well-known member
Joined
16 May 2001
Messages
45,603
Location
UK East Coast
Visit site
If the funds are there then electric is the way to go... blissfully quiet & the battery readily splits off which halves the weight and, if you are worried about such things, the epropulsion battery floats (although I have yet to test that!). Oh yes, and no need to store petrol on the boat.

Yes, there are big benefits to electric. I chose Torqeedo, and have no regrets. But, they are more expensive to buy, although wonderfully quiet and so easy to mount on the dinghy bit-by-bit.
 

ghostlymoron

Well-known member
Joined
9 Apr 2005
Messages
9,889
Location
Shropshire
Visit site
I like my Seagull Forty Plus.

Not the lightest, not the quietest, but made of good materials. Simple and reliable.
Mine is my favourite engine it's light, makes a pleasing noise and reliable despite being over fifty years old. I see no reason why it won't do another fifty. I've adjusted to run on 20:1 which makes it a lot less polluting.
 

Bradders

Member
Joined
11 Sep 2005
Messages
111
Location
Duxford,Cambridgeshire
Visit site
I have had two Honda outboards supplied by Seamark Nunn a 10hp and a 6hp, I still have the 10 and have no intention of getting rid of it, the 10hp never misses a heart beat and I’m so impressed with the 6hp - amazing engine, I personally wouldn’t go with anything else but Honda and the service from Seamark is second to none !!
 

CAPTAIN FANTASTIC

Well-known member
Joined
15 Jul 2009
Messages
3,310
Location
Bristol Channel
Visit site
In my post above I said that I now have a Suzuki DF2.5. A couple of years ago, the Suzuki was left on the ground the wrong way round, for many hours, however, the engine started without any issues.
A few weeks ago, during the storm Evert we were in the Scilly isles; the Suzuki was at the back of the dinghy. Unfortunately, during the storm, which was blowing at 55 knots, the dinghy with the engine was picked up by the wind and turned upside down,; the engine was in the water for 12 hours. After the storm, I opened the screw to drain the carburettor, took out the spark plug to make sure no oil was in the cylinder, poured a bottle of fresh water on the engine and it started straight away. So, yes, I am happy with the Suzuki so far
 
Top