Morgan 41 Out Island

Slow_boat

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Does anyone have knowledge or opinions of these as apotential livaboard/long term cruiser based in southern Spain?

My brother has been to look at a 1984 one on my behalf and the photos look good very nice. I have done a bit of net trawling and read the reviews. Is the long keel a problem for stern-to mooring/marinas? Are they a bit gloomy and hot below? Prices seem very low for a lot of boat?
 

Tranona

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The price is probably low because there is little demand for old American boats. They were the style in their era but things have moved on and there are much more suitable boats available. You will also need to check that it is in the EU legitimately.
 

TQA

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The old O/I 41s were/are good, strong, heavy, roomy, slow boats with powerful engines which they need if windward work is required. They were built for the Bahamas/Caribbean charter trade. About a 1000 were built and many are still rumbling around the Caribbean.

Some/many have had serious osmosis problems so check carefully for that. Also the hull to deck joint and bulkhead tabbing should be checked carefully. I looked at some and they do very well at anchor but I wanted something with more sailing chops.

I don't know about Med prices but they can go for much less in the US/Caribbean. Of course he osmosis factor will bring the price down dramatically if present. I know of one changing hands recently for around $18k in St Maarten. Recent Yanmar OK condition but some soup plate size blisters.
 

Tranona

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Thanks, Tranona.

It is up for 50k euros, is med-ready including aircon and heating, and British flagged.

The "British Flag" does not mean anything on its own. You need documentary proof that there are no VAT or RCD compliance issues. Sure that it will be well equipped - as TQA says these boats were built primarily for use in tropical climates, but the gear will almost certainly be mainly US origin and may present problems with maintenance and spares as the boat gets older. always question marks against boats for sail at relative bargain prices so you have to weight up whether the positives outweigh the negatives.

Looked at another way a reasonable similar sized Moody or similar of that age is likely to cost 60-75% more.
 

Salty John

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Actually, Euros 50k is at the top end of the price range for a 41 Outhouse. They range in price from $45,000 to $80,000. At the high end you'd expect a 1986 model with a new engine and recent refit.

I know the boat quite well, we travelled in loose company with one from Dominican Republic to BVI. That's an upwind bash and it did surprisingly well - despite its 'sails like a brick' reputation.

I've looked over a few but could never quite bring myself to own one. They have a voluminous interior, very high freeboard, centre cockpit and very moderate draught. They came in ketch (mainly) and sloop rig. An excellent floating caravan, hugely practical but not a pretty boat by any means.
 

silver-fox

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They have a reputation for poor windward performance and have a low AVS. (108 or thereabouts from memory) If you search the net you will find a good few complaining about build quality too. Do enough Googling and you will find loads of information.

It was enough to put me off when I was first attracted to a very well preserved one! But, one man's meat is another man's poison as they say so it might suit your friend very well.
 

Slow_boat

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Thanks, all.

I think we've resumed our decision to go on what we have (Sadler 29) with the advantage of being smaller, cheaper to run and berth, and to sit on the hard (twin keels) for the winter.

41 foot would only be worth it to live aboard full time, which we can't afford as I'll have to work the winters to pay for the summers.

41 foot is almost £3k to overwinter 6 months in Spain!

Thanks for the views, I feel beter now!
 

Robin

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There is a 36ft Westerly Conway for sale at Davis's yard in Poole, new to the market I was told at just £27,500. I only saw the outside as I was visiting friends nearby, but they said the broker told them it was a really good one and it looked good on the outside at least. Don't know any more but the Conway is an excellent liveaboard and long distance cruiser, at £27,500 you should take your handcuffs as it is a steal! I can't remember the brokers either, it did have a sign on it and is on the hard right by where the boats are craned in, half way down the far right row as you drive down.
 

Robin

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Yes that is the one, £28,500 I see not £27,500 as I said but then negotiation is still possible. Later Conways were all wood interior whereas this one is part grp mouldings but it all looks in good nick. That is a lot of boat for the money and a well proven long distance cruiser. I have sailed one a few times across Channel and in fact returned Cherbourg to the Solent into a very cold NE6/7 early season, this was a company SC charter I skippered and we had 8 people on board.

I would think with a bit of updating of rigging, sails, some more electronics and maybe a new cooker this would be a very good low cost liveaboard.
 

chinita

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Thanks, all.

I think we've resumed our decision to go on what we have (Sadler 29) with the advantage of being smaller, cheaper to run and berth, and to sit on the hard (twin keels) for the winter.

41 foot would only be worth it to live aboard full time, which we can't afford as I'll have to work the winters to pay for the summers.

41 foot is almost £3k to overwinter 6 months in Spain!

Thanks for the views, I feel beter now!

I think that is a sensible decision.

I have lived aboard our 46ft ketch in the past but much prefer to trouser the savings from downsizing to 32ft for our six months aboard each year.

A big boat is nice when long term anchoring and full time living aboard but until that time comes for you stick with the smallest you can live on rather than the biggest you can afford.
 
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