Hows a harbour wall built

hlb

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Yes, thats ok for shallow harbours, but what about deap ones.

I presume they had to dig some foundations first, then start on the wall. But how did they do that, ten or twenty metres down.

I've always wondered, just never got around to ask before.
 

DinghyMan

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I wonder if there are any ports on the northern french coast that need better harbour walls? There are a few boats lined up at the entrances at the moment just ripe for sinking... /forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif
 
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Possibly using timber piles installed with a drop hammer mounted on a floating barge to construct a watertight or near watertight coffer dam and then pumping out the water with a manual or horse driven pump
 

DinghyMan

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I think variations on the caisson theme have been used for a long time - see http://www.absoluteastronomy.com/topics/Caisson_(Asian_architecture) as they reckon its been used for over 2,000 years below ground and since 984 above ground. They probably didn't use the pressurised ones though and just went with the open top coffer dam style.

Oddly enough I've just finished a book about Dr Haldane who diagnosed what caused the bends that workers got when working in pressurised caissons amongst other things.
 

No Regrets

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In engineering terms, the Pyramids exceed anything we have today, given the bare essentials they had to work with.

Even the bronze archimedes screws used to water the hanging gardens of Babylon were astonishing.

Chucking a wall up in 30ft Water is a piece of p1ss by comparison /forums/images/graemlins/tongue.gif
 
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