How do you hang your fenders.

bedouin

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When coming alongside I tie to the wires - quicker and easier to get them in the position I want. If I am staying for any length of time I'll reposition them and tie to stanchion bases, bottom of shrouds, genoa car etc where possible, but that may still leave one or two on the wires
 

geem

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Anywhere on the guardwires. If you worry about loads from fenders, how much confidence do you have that your guardwres will keep you on the boat?
Stanchions are extra long, solid aluminium bolted to a substantial toerail. Absolutely no concern about stretching 5mm stainless steel wire from the weight of fenders😅
 

thinwater

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Some thoughts I think are obvious:

  • The maximum load from fenders on the wire is not from the fenders themselves, but when the fenders are pulled down by the dock, either by friction (moderate) or if they get trapped under the dock (I've see the ends of the fenders pulled right off). In fair weather the load is light, but if you visit the boat during a storm you will get a different picture. Few people visit marinas during force 10 and up.
  • Lifelines are not intended to catch a standing person. They are intended to catch a person that is sliding or one that has enough sense to sit, scoot, or crawl. Hand holds and jacklines (jackstays) should be well inboard.
  • The stanchions are to hold the line in vertical spacing. They were never intended to hold the full load of a falling person. This is why strong bracing at the ends is VITAL. The stanchion is mostly just a spacer.

About toe rail. World Sailing requires them forward of the beam but not aft. Some boats comply, some don't, and some have them full length. Some cats have toe rail (mine did, made of tubing, full length with small gaps) and some don't. Because they are for catching feet when heeling, you would think multihulls would skip them, but not always. PDQ included them and specified in the manual that they were to be used for fenders. If you think about it, industrial catwalks are required to have toe rail.
 

geem

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[*]Lifelines are not intended to catch a standing person. They are intended to catch a person that is sliding or one that has enough sense to sit, scoot, or crawl. Hand holds and jacklines (jackstays) should be well inboard.
[*]The stanchions are to hold the line in vertical spacing. They were never intended to hold the full load of a falling person. This is why strong bracing at the ends is VITAL.
Yours may not be intended to catch a person. Ours are. That's the way the boat was designed. The stanchions are taller than standard. They are far more substantial than many that you see with 3 screws tapped I to the deck. The stanchions bolt to the toerail. The toerail is bolted to the boat every 100mm with M8 bolts. The stanchions are spaced closely to provide additional strength.
For us, going forward to deal with an issue in bad weather, requires something more than a flimsy wire with low stanchions spread widely apart. It is the obvious hand hold on the high side of the boat but it also needs to catch you should you be flung to the low side. As additional safety on ocean passages, we lace in a zigzag the bottom guardwires with string that threads through the holes in the toerail. This keep somebody from rolling under the bottom wire.
I can't imagine having guardwires that you fall against and go straight through because the stanchions are not substantial enough.
 

Refueler

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Yours may not be intended to catch a person. Ours are. That's the way the boat was designed. The stanchions are taller than standard. They are far more substantial than many that you see with 3 screws tapped I to the deck. The stanchions bolt to the toerail. The toerail is bolted to the boat every 100mm with M8 bolts. The stanchions are spaced closely to provide additional strength.
For us, going forward to deal with an issue in bad weather, requires something more than a flimsy wire with low stanchions spread widely apart. It is the obvious hand hold on the high side of the boat but it also needs to catch you should you be flung to the low side. As additional safety on ocean passages, we lace in a zigzag the bottom guardwires with string that threads through the holes in the toerail. This keep somebody from rolling under the bottom wire.
I can't imagine having guardwires that you fall against and go straight through because the stanchions are not substantial enough.

Standard production boats are not as strong as yours ... they are as another stated - to work in conjunction with rest of boat ...
 

lustyd

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If I didn’t tie fenders to the guard wires why would I have guard wires? The jack stays keep the people on board, the guard wires probably wouldn’t.
My fenders don’t generally touch the pontoon though, so no strain on anything.
 

Momac

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Stainless steel guardrails on my boat and cleats.
Yachts tend not to have rails and for some reason are often short on cleats. It's like the designers have not considered the boat might be moored up to a pontoon or wall.
 

Refueler

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So why don't modern production boats make guardwires fit for purpose? It's not that hard.

Why don't they make light bulbs to last a lifetime ? Despite the claims of modern ones !!

OK ... Guard wires are a little more serious than a ight bulb ... but we could ask why boat builders don't put Lifejackets .. Lifebuoys etc on boats as part of the 'factory inventory' .... (please don't quote Sailaway sales - they are at best a mediocre attempt).
 

Refueler

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Stainless steel guardrails on my boat and cleats.
Yachts tend not to have rails and for some reason are often short on cleats. It's like the designers have not considered the boat might be moored up to a pontoon or wall.

Often its based on the projected and established market ... if a boat is built by Baltic based - (many famous brands are) - then often to have a bow roller / stemhead fitting for an anchor is only offered as buyers option to request. Cleats / fairleads again same - as most boats built for that market will Baltic moor etc.
 

The Q

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On my sailing boat there can be 3 fenders a side, there are two eyes each side on the side decks, to which a vertical fender is attached each can be lifted inboard without unhooking, the third fender is horizontal and also can be lifted inboard without unhooking..

The motorboat has 6 eyes each side to which fenders are permanently attached, they can be lifted on. Deck when required. The rear two eyes can also hold a triple set of horizontal fenders for stern on Mooring.
 

geem

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Why don't they make light bulbs to last a lifetime ? Despite the claims of modern ones !!

OK ... Guard wires are a little more serious than a ight bulb ... but we could ask why boat builders don't put Lifejackets .. Lifebuoys etc on boats as part of the 'factory inventory' .... (please don't quote Sailaway sales - they are at best a mediocre attempt).
Since a strong guardwires are a primary safety aid, I do find it odd that on some boats they are so flimsy. Almost decorative.
On flat roofs on commercial buildings, safety railings around an accessible roof need to be strong enough to stop somebody falling over the edge. It's not much different on a boat, with similar consequences. If a worker fell through the guardrail system the HSE would be all over it and somebody would be sued. Why not with boats guardrail systems?
 

Refueler

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Since a strong guardwires are a primary safety aid, I do find it odd that on some boats they are so flimsy. Almost decorative.
On flat roofs on commercial buildings, safety railings around an accessible roof need to be strong enough to stop somebody falling over the edge. It's not much different on a boat, with similar consequences. If a worker fell through the guardrail system the HSE would be all over it and somebody would be sued. Why not with boats guardrail systems?

No need to convince me - try telling Boat builders ...
 

Sea Change

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Amel very sensible have tubular stainless guardrails. It's a miniscule increase in weight and windage and gives you a very sturdy place where you can tie almost anything on without worry, grab it to climb aboard, stand on it to reach a leech line, etc etc.
Why doesn't every cruising boat have this? It's common on motor boats. Is it cost, or more of a style/habit thing?
 

jbweston

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For the majority who do tie fenders to the guard wires, why the upper one and not the lower one?
On my boat it's because tying them to the lower wire leaves the fender line in contact with the teak toe rail which would both abrade the line and the toe rail as the boat rolled the fenders back and forth and up and down against the pontoon. It might be hard to visualise the geometery, but the toe rail is wide enough that the width of the fender makes the line more vertical and keeps it clear of the toerail when the other end is higher up. but it's in contact with the toe rail when tied further down.

Surely this horses for courses - sensible skippers do what they think best suits them and their boat. I've tied my fenders to the upper rail or the tops of the stanchions for the 14 years I've had the boat and based her in different harbours, visiting many more, and I've never had a problem. But if tying your fenders lower down suits you and your boat better, you should do it. I would if it were me.

I confess that just once or twice I've tied an extra fender to the lower rail and I'm pleased to say I wasn't struck by a thunderbolt or viisited by the RYA Morality Police (Sail section) to confiscate my Yachtmaster certificate.
 
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