Hand carry parts to greece

Rigilao

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I am keeping my boat in preveza for the winter months. I will now return to the boat flying into athens.

I have alot of parts as well as some new sails that I will bring to the boat.

I live in a Schengen-country, but not part of the european union.

Is there any customs-issues bringing parts to your non-eu registered boat by plane?
 

Hooligan

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Registration of the boat should make no difference. What will matter is the rules governing the transfer of goods between the two countries. I am assuming that this should not be an issue given your situation but a quick search should get you the answer. Greece can be a little self definitional in its application of EU rules that said.
 

billskip

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……. and pay VAT on their value ?
Well that depends on the customs....for example the boat parts, if not new, could be claimed as parts of the boat being returned after winter, the boat, complete with all its bits is entitled to be in EU waters for 18 months...I think. Declaration may prove more rewarding than trying to wing it, coz if stopped, ignorance is no excuse.
Any new parts the op should have claimed vat refund on export fro his country, so paying vat on import evens it out a bit.
 

Graham376

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Have a read of this - EU Duty Free Allowance - Everything You Need to Know.

For non-EU residents arriving by air or sea, the duty-free allowances are as follows:​

  • 200 cigarettes or 100 cigarillos or 50 cigars or 250g of tobacco
  • 4 liters of still wine and 16 liters of beer and 1 liter of spirits or 2 liters of fortified or sparkling wine
  • Other goods up to a value of €430 per person
 

Rigilao

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So let’s say that a person would drive a car over the border instead. He brings a brand new super-expensive bicycle that he intend to use while being in the country on holiday. He is staying there for 1 month before leaving back home.

Shall this person declare and pay VAT on his bike on the country he is visiting? Makes no sense to me whatsover.

The boat is not staying in greece, and it just got there before the winter, so it is not «based in greece». It will be departing from the country (and not to return anytime soon) within a month. With this being said, I find it similar to the example with the bicycle.
 
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billskip

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Bit different by car for you, if you are not stopped and asked you don't have a problem, but you are arriving by air so you have to pass customs carring a lot of gear...if they don't stop you OK...but if they do,.... be prepared.
 

KevinV

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I've carried a heap of parts by plane (recently £1900's worth), with a list clearly marked in caps "for vessel in transit vessel name", and with a joining letter. I've then gone through the green channel. Questioned once, and as soon as they saw the magic words they let me through.
They're UK vat paid parts going onto a UK vessel - where they are joining the ship is irrelevant. Same principle as if you were in transit through an airport.
 

Graham376

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So let’s say that a person would drive a car over the border instead. He brings a brand new super-expensive bicycle that he intend to use while being in the country on holiday. He is staying there for 1 month before leaving back home.
I don't think a bike would be any more of a problem than surfboards, golf clubs, camping gear, etc. which people often carry without problems. For us Brits arriving in Europe by air, we normally look like any other tourist and receive barely a glance. Far more likely to be pulled when arriving home as customs know a good few will be carrying excess of booze or cigs.
 

st599

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A bicycle is classed as sporting goods, not a vehicle, so there can be VAT due on the portion above your personal allowance if you haven't Carnet'd it - most customs look the other way if it's one bike, the owner is present and you promise to export it again at the end of the holiday. (This has been an issue on Eurostar - you used to drop your bike of at Eurodispatch and pick it up in Paris or Brussels, but that's an unacompannied import, so they don't do that any more)

There have been groups hit with VAT and import duties because they didn't bother to get an ATA Carnet for their sports equipment. Welsh cyclists charged €8,500 to take bikes to Spain on charity ride
 
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How about the view that the goods are for a Yacht in Transit. That is, one from the country of registration and ownership, it being in the EU under TA (18 months in any one unbroken period). The registration/ownership and place she is being kept, and for how long, does matter, therefore . If you are a YIT, the tax should be paid at the source country (where you live and where you buy your stuff). If your yacht in not in transit, the you ought be liable to import taxation according to the rules.
 

westernman

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So let’s say that a person would drive a car over the border instead. He brings a brand new super-expensive bicycle that he intend to use while being in the country on holiday. He is staying there for 1 month before leaving back home.

Shall this person declare and pay VAT on his bike on the country he is visiting? Makes no sense to me whatsover.

The boat is not staying in greece, and it just got there before the winter, so it is not «based in greece». It will be departing from the country (and not to return anytime soon) within a month. With this being said, I find it similar to the example with the bicycle.
A long long time ago, I drove through Yugoslavia and into Greece with a windsurfer on top of my car. At customs, this was noted in my passport, and recorded in their systems. I was warned that if I left Greece without it there would be hell to pay.
 
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