Dinghy Packed size

Spyro

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I'm thinking about replacing my old Avon and noticed when looking at New dinghies that the quoted packed sizes seem a lot bigger than the size my Avon folds up to when all the air is sucked out and rolled tight.
looking at something like a Wetline 260 What are peoples experiences? Do they pack smaller than the quoted sizes?
 

theoldsalt

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In my experience the smallest packed size for any inflatable is when first delivered. Once unpacked and inflated they never seem to go back. This seems to apply whatever the make.:confused::confused:
 

reeac

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I don't think that they ever go back to that original compactness. If packed dimensions are important to you then the Bombard AX2 has a solid transom and slatted floor but still folds to fit into a space of 90x43x43cm.[the under cockpit floor space in my Sadler]. The AX2's quoted dimensions are 75x45x28 cm. and it weighs only 18Kg. if I remember correctly. The downside is that the AX2 doesn't have a lot of space in it but it's fine for carrying on the boat for occasional use and seems well made. We've had ours for 4 years now.
 

Ruffles

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I'm thinking about replacing my old Avon and noticed when looking at New dinghies that the quoted packed sizes seem a lot bigger than the size my Avon folds up to when all the air is sucked out and rolled tight.
looking at something like a Wetline 260 What are peoples experiences? Do they pack smaller than the quoted sizes?
Is the Avon a 'doughnut'? I replaced my disintegrating PVC doughnut with a similar size one with a transom and 'tits' as it were. Half the capacity but a larger packed size.
Agree with the comment about PVC though. And I reckon repeated packing and unpacking at low temperatures damages the glued joints eventually.
 

JayBee

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It's because your old AVON would have been Hypalon type fabric. All current dingies are (AFAIK) PVC, which is far less supple.

My two year old Avon dinghy is Hypalon and I have just had a look at the current Avon website which says:

"AVON uses the best available materials from our Hypalon® (Dupont® Dow elastomers) coated fabrics, immensely strong, wear resistant and waterproof, providing a craft that is virtually unaffected by weather (and excesses of heat, cold or humidity), fuel, oil, strong sunlight and everyday abrasion, to our highest quality adhesives, fibreglass mouldings, woodwork and inflation valves. We provide you with the best in class components, the best in industry standard."

I did hear a rumour that Dupont are not manufacturing Hypalon any more but can this be true? I believe that Achilles and some other dinghy manufacturers also use Hypalon, or something similar - not always PVC.

Agree about the near impossibility of getting a deflated hard transom dinghy neatly back into its valise, even with the LVM in/deflater.
 

Spyro

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Agreed, but also the common Avons don't have a big plywood transom.
The present Avon is still perfectlty servicable The problem is the Avon doesn't have a hard transom and is very unstable when trying to mount the outboard on it's bracket. a couple of times when I'm in it on my own it's been very close to tipping up backwards.

So I guess that if I want a hard transom on a cheap dinghy I will have to put up with a larger packed size.
 

reeac

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The present Avon is still perfectlty servicable The problem is the Avon doesn't have a hard transom and is very unstable when trying to mount the outboard on it's bracket. a couple of times when I'm in it on my own it's been very close to tipping up backwards.

So I guess that if I want a hard transom on a cheap dinghy I will have to put up with a larger packed size.

I too like a solid transom [and slatted floor]. Have a look at an AX2 and see if its carrying capacity is sufficient for your needs.
 

truscott

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I have two Wetline Eco 260's. The first one I got 5 years ago, is built of a much more thicker fabric. It's still going strong after repeated packings into it's valise, and does indeed pack down smaller than the quoted dimensions. The second one seems to be a much lighter fabric, and doesn't pack down as well. Interestingly, they have changed the valise too. The new one isn't really a bag as such, more of shaped tarp that is folded up and cinched tight with straps. Still fits in to the quarter berth on the Limbo, so am still happy with it, but do have that lingering concern that I'm not going to get the same amount of years out of it, as the first one.

We get some pretty harsh sun out here in the Gulf, and the fact that the first has stood up to years of use and abuse is just fantastic (it's on the other boat now, hence the new one).


PT.
 

eljocko

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The present Avon is still perfectlty servicable The problem is the Avon doesn't have a hard transom and is very unstable when trying to mount the outboard on it's bracket. a couple of times when I'm in it on my own it's been very close to tipping up backwards.

So I guess that if I want a hard transom on a cheap dinghy I will have to put up with a larger packed size.



Spyro, over the past souple of years I've bought and used various inflatable dinghies, with the emphasis being on a compromise between stowed size and safety / practicality, as follows....
Narwhal 2.2m round tail c/w slats, similar to your Avon, really practical but never used it with an outboard. Would have kept it if it did not leak air from the seams.
Waveco 2.3m transom c/w slats. Bought this for its small size but it proved too small for carrying two people plus kit. Not good in big seas.
Now using a Seago 2.4m, transom c/w airdeck. Big enough and quite stable in the rough stuff. Though I still find it bulky to store onboard.
I use a seperate dinghy to and from the moorings. It's an Avon 2.81 rover and it's great, though too big to keep onboard.
I think your best option would be get an Avon 2.5m transom, this would give you the benefits of hypalon i.e small packed size.
Hope this helps.
JK out.
 

rob2

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I can sometimes get my 2.7 Plastimo back into its valise - but there won't be any room left for the seat and oars! One problem is that the valves are removed completely to deflate it, so you can't suck the air out.

Rob.
 

VicMallows

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Interestingly, they have changed the valise too. The new one isn't really a bag as such, more of shaped tarp that is folded up and cinched tight with straps. Still fits in to the quarter berth on the Limbo, so am still happy with it

I think the 'tarp' valise is great! .... I actually use it, while I could never be bothered struggling with the bags other dingies came with. My Wetline ECO is around 5yrs and should easily manage the same again. Pretty obviously from the same factory in China as most of the low-end-price inflateables.

I also find my quarter-berth the most realistic storage space!

Vic
 

vyv_cox

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PVC technology has not stood still. The Zodiac I owned 20 years ago and the Quicksilver I own now are very different in terms of flexibility, strength and durability.

Can't help with a flexible transom though, but it helps a lot to take a series of photographs of the very first unpacking to help with getting it back in the same bag.
 

Spyro

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Thanks for replies all good info. An Avon 260 would be lovely and I know it will outlast me but at 5 or 6 times the price of a wetline I just couldn't justify it. And SWMBO would have a fit.
 

doug748

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Nothing beats a soft Avon for stowing, as you can stuff it in there without damage; and, as someone said, the quarter berth or the foredeck are the best spots for a solid transom job.
I like this site for comparison of sizes, weights etc:
http://www.ronhalemarine.co.uk/superbasket/category/11/New_Inflatable_Boats_and_RIB's
I was going to get a Seago 2.7 but in the end bought an Avon with transom, secondhand. They seem to have run down their used stock though.
 

theoldsalt

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I think the choice of inflatable may be influenced by the use to which it is put.
If your yacht is kept in a marina and the dinghy kept rolled up on board and only sees the light of day on rare occassions then maybe an inexpensive one may be Ok.
However mine is stored ashore in a dinghy rack and used to get aboard each time I go out at my river mooring. I also tow my inflatable everywhere as I am too lazy to deflate it, stow it, then re-inflate it at my destination then go through the same routine on my return trip home. It therefore serves me well as an "emergency life raft" should I ever need one.So it gets fairly heavy use and is exposed to UV all season. I therefore chose an Avon. It is now over 20 years old and still going strong. I think it was a wise and economic investment.
As an aside, I also prefer the rubber rowlocks to the more usual locked oars on other makes.
 
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