Boat Share- anyone interested?

StephenW

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Considering buying a 32ft ish yacht, but am concerned about the cost of buying and mooring anything half decent (who said "me too"?!). I'm therefore interested in hearing from anyone else considering sharing. I was originally interested in something like a Seacracker 33 as the price is typically sub-£20K ish, but it occured to me that a half share in a more expensive boat may make more sense mooring fees etc).

Getting married in May (so would need to buy the boat before then) and want to sail for maybe 3 months (UK/France, maybe Med) starting June'ish as an extended honeymoon. Hopefully this would be a long-term proposition (the boat!).

Interested in a dry, seaworthy fin-keel yacht which is up to some long distance cruising and weekend recreational use too based somewhere within easy access of the A3/M27 (so easy to reach from London). Really like the Westerly Fulmar (did coastal skipper cours in December in one) - well built although they are expensive, maybe also Sadler 34 or similar. Ideal would be one owner, well maintained and well equipped inc radar and normal kit.

Anyone interested or have any comments for someone new to boat ownership considering boatshare or contemplating this type of trip?
 

jana

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I'm contemplating selling a half share in my very well equipped sadler 34, contact me if interested.

jana
 

rogerroger

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Hi Stephen

A couple of things.

1. I know we're all different - but I'd rather charter than share a boat. I nearly went into a syndicate but am SO grateful that I didn't in the end. Yes my boat costs me a lot more, but she's mine, ALL MINE! I can do what I like to her, take her whereever I want and for as long as I want without having to consult anyone. It's an extension of my home and I haven't got to worry about how anyone else treats it.

2. Have I missed something in your post ? but who is going to want to pay for half your boat if you're going to swan off to the Med in it for the summer months??? ... doesn't sound too appealing to me !

all the best...

Roger Holden
www.first-magnitude.co.uk
 
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Stephen,

Yacht partnerships are notoriously difficult yo get right but yes I am looking for a yacht fraction.

> Seacracker 33 as the price is typically sub-£20K

They do seem good value but the bow looks too fine and low for your stated objective of long distance cruising. I assume you want to head off west down the channel? In this case you need a hull profile designed to take on serious waves, to understand my point look at a Rival 34.

> Getting married in May (so would need to buy the boat before then) and want to > sail for maybe 3 months (UK/France, maybe Med) starting June'ish as an
> extended honeymoon

You cannot be serious. You want someone to give you about 15k so you can indulge in a dream!

Further more it takes a long time to find the right 2nd hand yacht. You cannot get married, buy an old yacht and then have a 3 month trouble free cruise all in the next 6 months. When buying a boat over 15 years old it is best to assume maintenance days will outnumber sailing days during the first 2 years.

> based somewhere within easy access of the A3/M27

Here is another partnership problem. I assume you are new to sailing and would enjoy the prospect of many week-end trips around the solent. Me, I've done the Solent week-end thing and would instead prefer to base the yacht in say La Rochelle.

> Westerly Fulmar

My first sailing holiday was on a Moody 36 and for the next year this was my dream design. Personally I could not get emmotional about either a Fulmar or Moody these days.

To wrap up...

After contemplating yacht fractions for 6 months I think the following syndicate scenarios are the most likely to work.

1 - Long established group of buddies who just happen to own a yacht together.
2 - Brand new Barvaria type yacht based in the Med. I view this as a cost effective variation to bareboat chartering.
3 - My plan. Buy 100% of the yacht I want then slowly fractionalize the ownership over a few years as the right people turn up.
 
G

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Seacracker vs. Rival

> Seacracker 33 as the price is typically sub-£20K

They do seem good value but the bow looks too fine and low for your stated objective of long distance cruising. I assume you want to head off west down the channel? In this case you need a hull profile designed to take on serious waves, to understand my point look at a Rival 34.

Sorry Jonjo, but I would have to dissagree. With no criticism of the Rival 34 (wonderful boats, as is the 36), the Seacracker has a superb reputation for distance cruising. Of the 13 built, one has circumnavigated TWICE, three have been to Australasia, one has spent the last two years cruising from Devon to Norway, Sweden and Denmark, etc. etc. Not a bad record for a small fleet.

The keel is relatively full, long enough for the boat to stand up and dry out like any long keeler, being a modified forefoot with a skeg hung rudder. The bow / keel combination parts the waavres rather than bounces off them, making a much more comfortable ride than on a flat bottomed modern fin keeler. I think a bow which is too full can have adverse effects on comfort when sailing to windward.

The forepeak is big enough for a couple to sleep in - and I sleep there even at sea (unless it's a huge sea).

As to the Rival's -- well, they are lovely but you do pay a lot more for the name and (deservedly good) reputation.

For what it's worth, the Seacracker's sell for between £25,000 and £30,000, with a couple ratherlightly tatty ones selling last year for £16 - 20K. In good condition they are approximately the same value as the Contessa 32.
 

StephenW

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Hi Jonjo
Thanks for the post, but I'm afraid I'm an eternal optimist and expect I'll manage something that works, whether its purchase of or just charter then share.

Several people are expressing reservations about sharing and I can see there are some real shortcomings unless sharing with an "occasional sailor".

Have never been on a Seacracker, but if you look at the hull shape it looks made for going through water comfortably, a bit like a dolphins back upside down. But thanks for the pointer about the Rival.

Cheers
Stephen
 
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>>Have never been on a Seacracker, but if you look at the hull shape it looks made for going through water comfortably, a bit like a dolphins back upside down.<<

The hull shape is indeed very attractive and motion likely to be comfortable through moderate seas. I still maintain the bow will tend to dig into larger waves and as a result the boat will create a wet ride. The Contessa 32 is known for this and the hull similarities with the Seacracker are already documented.

There are many aspects to the Seacracket design that say it is a boat for serious passage making but as a syndicate owner you could do so much better for the same money.

3 or 4 like minded individuals could put £60K to £80K on the table and buy a no compromise long distance cruiser in the Rival, Tradewind or Nic 35 league. This sort of money would also mean the syndicate could buy its way out of the renovation millstone that often comes with a 15+ year old boat and instead go sailing 100%

I suspect retirement is a distant prospect for you and I, so the key question is do you really have time for more than 4 weeks sailing per year?

Put another way, do you want to own 100% of an old LandRover that will probably fail its next MOT or own 25% or the latest Delux RangeRover?
 

StephenW

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Re: Nice idea

Mmm, not quite what I had in mind John!

In fact the reason for putting all the info in was so that if there was someone who simply wanted to own a boat and help maintain it and share all the mooring and maintence fees and look at it every now and again; as well as benefiting from some first rate photos of where we go with it and maybe a bit of video too - we'd be the perfect partners!! Actually it sounds such a bargain I might even be interested.

By the way, nice to see there's another canoeist here. Just sold my only other "boat"; an aged but much loved KW7, to a medical student - easier for me to use one at one of the clubs at the coast, especially since I'll need two boats to introduce the other half to canoeing too when the weather warms up!

Have fun
Stephen
 
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