• REMINDER - COVID-19

    Any content, information, or advice found on social media platforms and the wider Internet, including forums such as YBW, should NOT be acted upon unless checked against a reliable, authoritative source, and re-checked, particularly where personal health and liberty is at stake. Seek professional advice/confirmation before acting on such at all times.

    Users who are found to promulgate FAKE NEWS on the forum in regard to this issue, intentional or otherwise, may find their access terminated. It is your responsibility to provide references to bona fide sources.

    FAKE NEWS, in this regard, is that which is posited by organisations, media, etc., that is repeated on the forum, or used to support personal opinion/hypothesis posted by users - FAKE NEWS is not necessarily the personal opinion/hypothesis being posted in itself, any issues with such should be challenged respectfully.

  • Boats 2020 and MDL Ocean Village Show cancelled at last minute

    Last minute announcement as Southampton City Council pulls the plug on both shows on Thursday evening over increased Coronavirus numbers in UK

    Read more...

Studland Bay - what you need to do

Star-Lord

Active member
Joined
25 Jan 2020
Messages
909
Location
Cagliari, Sardinia.
Really, originating in the far South West but based on the East Coast, I have frequently trundled back and forth along this bit of coast line and in addition to Studland, I have ducked into Poole, Swanage, Lulworth, Weymouth and even Poole before and after transiting Lime Bay. I fully support the thrust of this thread and believe the argument doesn’t require embellishment. It is always a mistake to make a case that can easily be refuted. Such as Studland constitutes the only safe haven for miles around as this can weaken the whole argument.
IMHO Studland is a vital anchorage of great strategic importance. Poole is a hike and better suited to shallow draft and local knowledge? Swanage holding is adequate and I have used it but did read it is not all that. Lulworth is usually to rolly with swell. Weymouth has a nice anchorage outside but very exposed and would consider it more fair weather. Portland Harbour has anchorages but a bit of local knowledge helps here as well and entering at night to anchor you will have to dodge all the moored unlit boats. Studland is ideal for a tired boat wishing to get some kipp before - or after - passing through the Needles. And it is easy to use which is especially important when tired.
 

Star-Lord

Active member
Joined
25 Jan 2020
Messages
909
Location
Cagliari, Sardinia.
Answer- don’t attempt to enter against the ebb. Called Seamanship

Plan ahead to use that large window of the flood - similar situations exist worldwide. More seamanship.

If the original plan goes to rats; change the plan early and with it the planned land fall. Even more seamanship.

These 3 lines completely refute any suggestion that Studland Bay should be treated as a haven of last resort and this line of argument weakens the whole argument for continuing to permit anchoring in Studland.

A much stronger argument is to refute the statement that current usage of Studland has a major impact on the environment and demonstrate that there are many other sites around the UK that have the same environment as Studland so no natural life is facing extinction as a result of anchoring in a Studland.

In a stroke this turns the debate from the defensive to the offensive and places the opposition on the back foot.
Studland Bay is a safe haven for yachts end of debate. Everyone knows it.
 

Seven Spades

Well-known member
Joined
30 Aug 2003
Messages
4,001
Location
Surrey
That’s not what I was asking. I would like to know the current situation. Studland has been designated a MCZ yet as I understand it what this means in practical terms has not been announced. When we we hear something?

Does BORG know if Studland is in line to be declared an HPMZ
 
Last edited:

Star-Lord

Active member
Joined
25 Jan 2020
Messages
909
Location
Cagliari, Sardinia.
That’s not what I was asking. I would like to know the current situatio. Studland has been designated a MCZ yet as I understand it what this means in pract terms has not been announced. When we we hear something?

Does BORG know if Studland is in line to be declared an HPMZ
If a yacht needs safe haven will she be asked to leave in a gale if Studland is designated a no anchoring zone?
 

oldharry

Well-known member
Joined
30 May 2001
Messages
9,065
Location
North from the Nab about 10 miles
Studland has been designated an MCZ. AT present no regulatory or conservation measures have been put in place, and a discussion between stakeholders (which includes BORG) as to the Management Measures that are required is continuing until late August. At present they are identifying just what the pressures are on the sealife and eco-systems with a view to deciding what needs to be done, and although its not on the agenda, what they can afford to do! So if anyone tries to tell you this summer you are breaking the rules they are wrong, because the rules haven't been created yet. MMO has confirmed that anchoring is at present legal in the Bay. Conservation legislation (Wildlife Act Sect 9) requires evidence of intent to disturb or take wildlife for a successful prosecution. Anchoring is a normal and legal activity, and for NGM to try to bring a prosecution he would have to prove your intent to destroy or diturb the wildlife of the seabed in which you dropped your anchor! As you can rarely even see the seabed except close in its a non starter for him!

NGM is pressing for a voluntary 'Management Group' who will oversee the Bay and ensure protection is maintained. They want tight management controls and EFMs. This sounds suspiciously like trying to get official sanction for a local vigilante group. BORGs policy is to press for an educational programme based on the leaflet we and RYA produced in 2014, which was welcomed by Conservationists and Boaters alike (tho NGM refused to have anything to do with it) in that it gave detailed information on how to handle our boats in this sensitive environment. Natural England had delayed approving it until nearly the end of that season, so that it did not have the impact it was intended. https://www.rya.org.uk/SiteCollectionDocuments/legal/Web Documents/Environment/AnchoringWithCare_Studland.pdf

Education has a strong appeal to DEFRA, who are very much in favour of it over legislation, not least because of the difficulty of policing, and the costs involved!

Why not EFM's? They are expensive to install and maintain. They need to be matched fairly closely to the weight of the boat using them, which in turn means they would ave to be supervised on a daily basis, which would cost a great deal more. A business plan drafted by Crown Estates who own the seabed there evidenced that EFMs could never be made to pay, even if visitors were prepared to pay £25 - £30 a go for using them! Inshore in Studland the current designs will not work because the water is too shallow anyway.

In answer to Star Lord's question: (#104) Conservationists all agree that Personal Safety afloat overrides any conservation objective. That sounds fine until we asked what constitutes an emergency? Lifeboats, Helos, CG SAR teams involved, is obvious enough. I single hand a great deal. More than once I have slipped in to Studland for urgently needed hot meal and rest. Is that an emergency? A strongly crewed boat coming up channel in a rising gale would be having a great time of it. An identical boat, crewed by a non too fit middle aged couple on their annual fortnight's cruise could be in serious trouble in the same conditions.

BORG continues to ask this question because it MUST remain the skippers decision whether or not it is safe to proceed given the state of the boat and its crew. So it remains an open question which even RYA cannot answer!
 
Last edited:

nortada

Well-known member
Joined
24 May 2012
Messages
12,006
Location
Summer Walton, Winter Iberia
Studland Bay is a safe haven for yachts end of debate. Everyone knows it.
Why drag me into a 2 year old irrelevant debate with selective a quote❓

No one, me included, has ever suggested that Studland was not a safe haven. My contention was, it is not the only safe haven along that bit of coast line so to make this claim could weaken the whole argument over Studland's future.

As for 6 months each year, my cruising ground is the East Coast, with numerous places where anchoring could be further restricted, my interest in this issue is obvious.

May I enquire, as you are currently in The Med, other than having another poke at me😉 what is your interest in this subject?

oldharry, once again an excellent summary - thank you.👍

We are still stuck in Portugal (where anchoring disturbing the sea horses is still an on-going issue), we hope to be back in the UK for a short visit in The Fall (to haul the Walton based boat) and wishing you every success, hope that sanity prevails - for all our sakes.🤞🏻
 
Last edited:

Star-Lord

Active member
Joined
25 Jan 2020
Messages
909
Location
Cagliari, Sardinia.
Why drag me into a 2 year old irrelevant debate with selective a quote❓

No one, me included, has ever suggested that Studland was not a safe haven. My contention was, it is not the only safe haven along that bit of coast line so to make this claim could weaken the whole argument over Studland's future.

As for 6 months each year, my cruising ground is the East Coast, with numerous places where anchoring could be further restricted, my interest in this issue is obvious.

May I enquire, as you are currently in The Med, other than having another poke at me, what is your interest in this subject?

oldharry, once again an excellent summary - thank you.

We are still stuck in Portugal (where anchoring disturbing the sea horses is still an on-going issue), we hope to be back in the UK for a short visit in The Fall (to haul the Walton based boat) and wishing you every success, hope that sanity prevails - for all our sakes.
Studland is the primary safe haven. There are many secondary places

My interest in this subject? LOL what kind of Neanderthal thinking says you have to be in the vicinity of Studland to care about this debate? The South Coast has even less anchorages then the Algarve and every one of them needs to be protected. Not only for the safety of sailors but for longevity of the boating business in general - especially the marinas and brokers and boaters of Pool and the Jurassic Coast.
 

nortada

Well-known member
Joined
24 May 2012
Messages
12,006
Location
Summer Walton, Winter Iberia
Studland is the primary safe haven. There are many secondary places

My interest in this subject? LOL what kind of Neanderthal thinking says you have to be in the vicinity of Studland to care about this debate? The South Coast has even less anchorages then the Algarve and every one of them needs to be protected. Not only for the safety of sailors but for longevity of the boating business in general - especially the marinas and brokers and boaters of Pool and the Jurassic Coast.
As on other occasions, I will not join you in a mud slinging diversion in this thread. 🥱

This subject is far too important.
 

Blue Sunray

Well-known member
Joined
20 Jul 2015
Messages
2,133
Studland Bay is a safe haven for yachts end of debate. Everyone knows it.
Unfortunately that sort of attitude is exactly what NGM wants, it does nothing to fend off potential regulation and legislation, whilst playing to his 'arrogant ignorant hoorays of yotties out to ruin the environment' line.
 

LittleSister

Well-known member
Joined
12 Nov 2007
Messages
10,898
Location
Me Norwich - Boat Orwell & Southwold
Thanks to Old Harry for the tip and info.

I'm afraid I haven't read all the subsequent posts, so apologies if already mentioned, but Studland's seahorses were featured with a photograph in the Guardian's week in wildlife photos a few days ago, with the following text:

'The Seahorse Trust, a marine conservation charity, has discovered during a survey dive that the endangered spiny seahorse has recolonised its former stronghold of Studland Bay in Dorset, UK. During one dive they found 16 seahorses, including pregnant males and a juvenile born this year. The increase is attributed to a reduction in people, boat traffic and associated noise and anchors.'

The week in wildlife – in pictures

Some tendentious language there, presumably from a Seahorse Trust press release.
 

nortada

Well-known member
Joined
24 May 2012
Messages
12,006
Location
Summer Walton, Winter Iberia
Thanks to Old Harry for the tip and info.

I'm afraid I haven't read all the subsequent posts, so apologies if already mentioned, but Studland's seahorses were featured with a photograph in the Guardian's week in wildlife photos a few days ago, with the following text:

'The Seahorse Trust, a marine conservation charity, has discovered during a survey dive that the endangered spiny seahorse has recolonised its former stronghold of Studland Bay in Dorset, UK. During one dive they found 16 seahorses, including pregnant males and a juvenile born this year. The increase is attributed to a reduction in people, boat traffic and associated noise and anchors.'

The week in wildlife – in pictures

Some tendentious language there, presumably from a Seahorse Trust press release.
Unfortunately, this is not altogether helpful news.

A rather short timescale to base any real significance on. Rather than the reasons given, possible there have been very favorable weather condition for sea horse regeneration?
 

oldharry

Well-known member
Joined
30 May 2001
Messages
9,065
Location
North from the Nab about 10 miles
This fairly typical of NGM's 'scientific' appraoch. Something happens which can be used to reinfoirce an argument, so it is used without further data, evidence or research. So 16 seahorses turned up. They were still around last week by the way, in spite of the return of the boats in considerable numbers. So that becomes 'clear evidence' that the absence of boats was why they returned. Forget the totally exceptional weather. Forget the massive spring tides, forget the unusually long period of easterly winds, it 'must' be the lack of boats, because that suits the argument. Why should anyone disbelieve him? he's the 'expert' on seahorses isnt he?
 

LittleSister

Well-known member
Joined
12 Nov 2007
Messages
10,898
Location
Me Norwich - Boat Orwell & Southwold
Presumably for the bay to have been 'recolonised' (as it said in the text I quoted above) it would have to have previously been decolonised. Is there any evidence of that?

There were seahorses there before. There are seahorses there now. Is this news? It is scientific evidence of what?
 

Robin

Well-known member
Joined
30 May 2001
Messages
16,436
Location
home again, where democracy needs no guns
Presumably for the bay to have been 'recolonised' (as it said in the text I quoted above) it would have to have previously been decolonised. Is there any evidence of that?

There were seahorses there before. There are seahorses there now. Is this news? It is scientific evidence of what?
Sh1t book keeping by SHT, ie cooking the books. NGM style.
 

alahol2

Well-known member
Joined
22 Apr 2004
Messages
5,138
Location
Portchester, Solent
I'm afraid I haven't read all the subsequent posts, so apologies if already mentioned, but Studland's seahorses were featured with a photograph in the Guardian's week in wildlife photos a few days ago, with the following text:

'The Seahorse Trust, a marine conservation charity, has discovered during a survey dive that the endangered spiny seahorse has recolonised its former stronghold of Studland Bay in Dorset, UK. During one dive they found 16 seahorses, including pregnant males and a juvenile born this year. The increase is attributed to a reduction in people, boat traffic and associated noise and anchors.'
Presumably they've all gone away again now... 17th July 2020

2020-07-17-DSC03556.JPG
 
Joined
5 Mar 2009
Messages
487
Location
Portsmouth (UK)
Blimey, look at all that sea grass. It looks like it has spread everywhere now. It must be all those anchors ploughing in the seeds And spreading them. I can see 100 boats there, so count in a few more that are out of picture then maybe 150 that day. No wonder I had trouble finding somewhere that was bare sand to anchor that day. My boat was in the Bay from midday probably in this picture. If I look closely it looks like my anchor is in a sandy area (as intended) but the yacht has drifted over the sea grass.
That afternoon the wind came up from the west quite strong and quickly. I sheltered there for 10 hours to wait for it to pass and for the tide to turn favourably again for my onward passage to the Solent. I seem to sleep well at anchor in Studland.
On the 18th I sailed right through the Solent and pondered over whether to anchor in Priory Bay next, but it was a little exposed so popped back into Gosport instead. Now does Priory Bay sound familiar, ah yes it is in the new Sandown Bay Conservation Zone area.
 
Top