Yearly Knagging

Elessar

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Who has or is going to practise MOB.
its good to at least once a year and a good thing to practise with anyone who comes out on the boat with you regally.
What else do we need to remember to do at least once a year.

Going out without a chartplotter. And getting back again. :)
 

ari

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I'm not for one second suggesting that it isn't a good idea to have a plan, but I'm curious to know whether anyone has ever experienced a man overboard at high speed from a normal planing motor boat? I've not only never had it happen to me (famous last words!), I've never even heard of it happening to anyone else. People falling in getting into or out of dinghies, yes. People falling off the pontoon, absolutely. Falling off a boat cruising along at 25 knots?

As to a plan, well mine is to turn around and go back and get them. Again, lot of stuff about Williamson turns, counting off x number of degrees on the compass in one direction and then at the right number swinging the other way for a set number. Is anyone ever going to remember all that in the heat of the moment?

The nearest I've ever got to a man overboard situation was some's hat blowing off. I just spun the boat round and went back down our wake till I found it. I think if I'd messed around with all that compass stuff we'd never have found it.

I think getting crew to point at the victim is a good idea, and it's worth having a think about how you'd help someone back on board. In most boats it's a case of getting them to the boarding ladder but worth thinking about what if it's rough and the boat is bouncing up and down, or they've become disabled in some way in the tumble.

But I think all the importance about practicing drills etc comes from lots of boat instructors being more familiar with sailing boats. There's far more chance of someone falling off one of those (due to the need to go forward in rough weather sometimes), more chance of someone being unconscious (unintended gybe, hit by boom) and it's far more difficult to stop and return in a hard charging sailing boat under full sail in rough weather.

Interested in people's thoughts, and not trying to suggest that MOB practice is a total waste of time. But I'm not sure it's that great a risk really (as I say, never ever heard of it happening but no doubt someone has?), or that hard in a motorboat to simply spin round and go back for them.

Does anyone ever practice what do do if someone goes over the side transferring from boat to tender with a fast running tide? Far more likely I'd have thought, but less exciting than practicing high speed Williamson turns.
 

Elessar

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I'm not for one second suggesting that it isn't a good idea to have a plan, but I'm curious to know whether anyone has ever experienced a man overboard at high speed from a normal planing motor boat? I've not only never had it happen to me (famous last words!), I've never even heard of it happening to anyone else. People falling in getting into or out of dinghies, yes. People falling off the pontoon, absolutely. Falling off a boat cruising along at 25 knots?

As to a plan, well mine is to turn around and go back and get them. Again, lot of stuff about Williamson turns, counting off x number of degrees on the compass in one direction and then at the right number swinging the other way for a set number. Is anyone ever going to remember all that in the heat of the moment?

The nearest I've ever got to a man overboard situation was some's hat blowing off. I just spun the boat round and went back down our wake till I found it. I think if I'd messed around with all that compass stuff we'd never have found it.

I think getting crew to point at the victim is a good idea, and it's worth having a think about how you'd help someone back on board. In most boats it's a case of getting them to the boarding ladder but worth thinking about what if it's rough and the boat is bouncing up and down, or they've become disabled in some way in the tumble.

But I think all the importance about practicing drills etc comes from lots of boat instructors being more familiar with sailing boats. There's far more chance of someone falling off one of those (due to the need to go forward in rough weather sometimes), more chance of someone being unconscious (unintended gybe, hit by boom) and it's far more difficult to stop and return in a hard charging sailing boat under full sail in rough weather.

Interested in people's thoughts, and not trying to suggest that MOB practice is a total waste of time. But I'm not sure it's that great a risk really (as I say, never ever heard of it happening but no doubt someone has?), or that hard in a motorboat to simply spin round and go back for them.

Does anyone ever practice what do do if someone goes over the side transferring from boat to tender with a fast running tide? Far more likely I'd have thought, but less exciting than practicing high speed Williamson turns.

In my opinion, williamson turns are for very maneuverable boats only. In my shaft drive flybridge, a crash stop and spinning on the engines is the best approach. Either way if you've been travelling at speed it's easy to follow your own wake back so you don't have to get too hung up on counting. Having a crew member pointing and not panicking is more valuable than counting.

The fact that you're not sure about the best approach makes Julies point for her - practice it and find out. And do it till you don't have to think about it. Instinctively knowing where the wind is to approach the casualty beam on from upwind (not the same as the into the wind approach of a sailing boat or RIB) , and having the feel for how much your boat will drift sideways with the wind, takes practice.

Getting people back on board is another matter, I've only picked people up for real when they've fallen out of toys or off someone else's boat in relatively calm seas. In a heavy sea my ladder becomes untenable and it's one of the few times I'd consider launching the liferaft.
 
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ari

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The fact that you're not sure about the best approach makes Julies point for her - practice it and find out.

I don't think I said that I wasn't sure about the best approach. As mentioned (and as you seem to agree), the best approach is simply to turn round quickly and return. In the instance I used of someone losing their hat (has happened a couple of times) I simply did an immediate spin round (after a quick check to make sure I wasn't going to be in anyone's way) and followed my wake back. In essence I guess it was close to a Williamson Turn, but without all the compass counting.

I'm not convinced practicing turning round and returning would improve anything or get me there any quicker, and I'm not convinced it's much of a risk in the first place but willing to be educated if people have had crew fall out of their boats at speed?

There's an argument that you should practice for any eventuality I suppose, but as mentioned, I don't recall anyone ever recommending practicing for someone falling into the water from an anchored boat with a tide running, which seems more likely, especially if transferring into the tender.
 

Elessar

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I don't think I said that I wasn't sure about the best approach. As mentioned (and as you seem to agree), the best approach is simply to turn round quickly and return. In the instance I used of someone losing their hat (has happened a couple of times) I simply did an immediate spin round (after a quick check to make sure I wasn't going to be in anyone's way) and followed my wake back. In essence I guess it was close to a Williamson Turn, but without all the compass counting.

I'm not convinced practicing turning round and returning would improve anything or get me there any quicker, and I'm not convinced it's much of a risk in the first place but willing to be educated if people have had crew fall out of their boats at speed?

There's an argument that you should practice for any eventuality I suppose, but as mentioned, I don't recall anyone ever recommending practicing for someone falling into the water from an anchored boat with a tide running, which seems more likely, especially if transferring into the tender.

ok - apologies!

The problem is bad instructors teach as if there is only one way to do things. It's about getting back as you say. But I maintain that the final approach to the casualty is harder than it seems and needs practice.

Falling in at anchor with the tide running is a hazardous situation for sure. I know what I would do, and it involves fast action with a throwing line followed if necessary with the use of the tender. And yes I do practice with the throwing line.
Also, I do usually run a floating line with a fender at the end behind the boat when at anchor with the tide running so self rescue may be possible too.
 

ari

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That's an interesting idea (streaming a line).

Diving into the tender and going after the casualty would be my first line of thought too. But suppose it was you that went in? Would the crew know what do do? Does anyone practice that?

That's kind of my point I guess, people seem to focus on practicing MOB out at sea at speed, and maybe that's entirely sensible, it is, after all, a potentially horrific and terrifying situation.

I just wonder how often it really does happen on motorboats compared to sailing boats (but keen to hear of anyone's experiences if it has)? And how it compares to other potential incidents that we don't seem to prepare for with quite the same enthusiasm?

As I said at the beginning, I'm not suggesting for one second that it's not good advice or that anyone shouldn't bother. It's just food for thought,
 

Elessar

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That's an interesting idea (streaming a line).

Diving into the tender and going after the casualty would be my first line of thought too. But suppose it was you that went in? Would the crew know what do do? Does anyone practice that?

That's kind of my point I guess, people seem to focus on practicing MOB out at sea at speed, and maybe that's entirely sensible, it is, after all, a potentially horrific and terrifying situation.

I just wonder how often it really does happen on motorboats compared to sailing boats (but keen to hear of anyone's experiences if it has)? And how it compares to other potential incidents that we don't seem to prepare for with quite the same enthusiasm?

As I said at the beginning, I'm not suggesting for one second that it's not good advice or that anyone shouldn't bother. It's just food for thought,

If I go in there's a high likelihood that people wouldn't know what do do. Have to hope I remembered the floating line that day. My big fear is someone else jumping in to save me.

I tell people without experience that if I go in to:
Put engines in neutral if we're going along
Press and hold the red button on the radio
Press this (TX) button and read this script (stuck next to the radio) or just tell the man what's happened and do as he says
 

ari

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I think that's sound advice (although think I'd be saying 'engines off' rather than hoping someone could find neutral without reversing over me! :D )
 

powerskipper

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When every I have someone swimming around a boat I put a line with a fender or 2 attached streaming out down tide, If I am really being careful I will put one from each side.
Just be warned, if you have kids swimming they soon find out that getting mum or dad to pull them back to the boat is great fun...…………………..for them!
 
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