Which are the best yacht knives?

Neeves

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First up - I have an aversion to cutting rope, so don't have much experience.

I try to ensure anyone on our cat carries a knife. I have spare knives for this who crew, empty handed. I carry a Currey's deck hand, sharpened (which has a shackle key slot and lanyard). We also have a 'yacht knife' also sharpened, dangerously. The yacht knife is an 'old fashioned' sheath knife. The yacht knife is stored in a 'instant tool block' (like a domestic kitchen knife block) which also holds a flat and star screw driver, spanner/shifter, alan keys and a torch and the block is attached inside the saloon cockpit within hands reach of the wheel.

When I do need to cut rope, after much should searching - it can be done at leisure, with a wooden board etc etc.

I had occasion to need a knife yesterday, rope round the prop and rudder.

We had to anchor, I had to dive - to find the razor sharp sheath knife was a waste of time and the Currey Deckhand might be great on deck but of little use underwater (too short).

There was no doing this at leisure in the warmth of the Australian sun, its Autumn here, it was lumpy and it had to be done NOW!

The most effective implement was a 'standard' domestic, serrated carving knife (I keep all our knives razor sharp).

However carrying a 30cm sharp bladed knife around deck, or in transit to a yacht, is hardly convenient - so what do people use that actually works. There maybe 2 options, a better yacht knife and a different personal knife or one tool that does all.

The suggestion needs to consider being an MOB and wanting to cut a tether.

And when I find a recommendation that suits I'll need to make anew 'tool block' as I am sure the better recommnendation will be a different dimension to the sheath knife (the tool block I made to fit what I thought would be needed :( ).

With thanks in advance

Jonathan
 

PuffTheMagicDragon

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For cutting ropes that have wrapped round the prop use a bread knife with a scalloped edge, the sawing action helps the cutting. It is scary sharp but there is no need to carry it round the deck.

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FlyingGoose

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I use a small diving knife , which is designed to cut ropes and nets if tangled, also salt water resistant and comes in a nice sheath that can be put on a belt of attached to life jacket
 

Martin_J

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The serrated style blade does seem to cut through rope so much easier, usually in one swipe..

The sharpest we seem to have on board are the Gerber E-Z Out Rescue knives.. Incredible at cutting through rope.

I just worry when opening them that fingers get close to the blade. Blade locks out though and no pointy end but great at cutting.
 

vyv_cox

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Last season we picked up a length of polypropylene in open water that tied us to the seabed. I was able to cut the length to the seabed, enabling us to motor to a bay where I cut the rest of it off the prop. The knife shown in the pic proved highly effective with its mixture of straight and serrated blade.

 

Norman_E

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The serrated style blade does seem to cut through rope so much easier, usually in one swipe..

The sharpest we seem to have on board are the Gerber E-Z Out Rescue knives.. Incredible at cutting through rope.

I just worry when opening them that fingers get close to the blade. Blade locks out though and no pointy end but great at cutting.

Easily the best knife for crew members to have on board. The small hole at the end of the handle should be used for a lanyard so that the expensive little knife does not get lost overboard. Lanyard clipped to belt loop and knife in trouser pocket works for me.
 

Kukri

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Answer in three parts:

1. Opinel now make their knives in "acier inoxydable" and they are still cheap enough that dropping one OB is not a catastrophe, but drill a hole in the wooden handle and put a wrist lanyard on it.
2. Rope round prop - bread knife like everyone else. Can live in the galley drawer and earn its keep by cutting bread by way of a day job.
3. Serious stuff - the most likely scenario is having to cut a mooring warp under tension - small hatchet inside cockpit locker lid, sharpened and then painted.
 

John 32i

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I always carry a Wichard Aquaterra Sailing Knife with a Serrated Blade, although fortunately never had to use it in an emergency!
Also a Leatherman Wave in the locker.
 

Fr J Hackett

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Last season we picked up a length of polypropylene in open water that tied us to the seabed. I was able to cut the length to the seabed, enabling us to motor to a bay where I cut the rest of it off the prop. The knife shown in the pic proved highly effective with its mixture of straight and serrated blade.



A Wichard without doubt the best pocket knife, serrated very sharp blade, shackle key and marlin spike. What more do you need.
 

Fr J Hackett

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Answer in three parts:

1. Opinel now make their knives in "acier inoxydable" and they are still cheap enough that dropping one OB is not a catastrophe, but drill a hole in the wooden handle and put a wrist lanyard on it.
2. Rope round prop - bread knife like everyone else. Can live in the galley drawer and earn its keep by cutting bread by way of a day job.
3. Serious stuff - the most likely scenario is having to cut a mooring warp under tension - small hatchet inside cockpit locker lid, sharpened and then painted.

I have an Opinel standard knife, it floats courtesy of the wooden handle.:encouragement: Never used it on board ship though for that it was either the Wichard or the bread knife.
 

rotrax

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Surprised the Victorinox Skipper has not been mentioned.

Tom Cunliffe likes his, I like mine.

Illegal to carry on shore, but a great sea knife IMHO. Serrated blade, very sharp, will make easy work of Dyneema, as well as conventional ropes.

The RNLI used a hacksaw fastened to a pole for cutting the pot buoy rope that trapped us off Rathlin Island a few years ago.
 

Sandy

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Surprised the Victorinox Skipper has not been mentioned.
At that price no wonder! Still it has a tool for removing stones from horses hooves!

I carry a very cheap, £10, knife from the local army surplus - serrated blade, marlin spike and shackle key. I'd still use the bread knife for some rope round the prop.
 

LadyInBed

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I've found that almost any old bread knife, as long as it's sharp, is good for cutting rope off prop. I have found that clasp knives don't give you a long enough draw. A hacksaw also does a good job.
Clasp knives with a wavey blade rather than serrated are good for cutting webbing.
 

westhinder

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For daily use around the boat I have both a Wichard knife such as Vyv showed and a Leatherman Wave, both are great.
For serious tangles around the prop I find a good hacksaw the most efficient. Last year we picked up a snake’s nest of three different types of rope, fish net and plastic covered iron mesh. No knife would have got through that. I wonder if the rope stripper I have installed now would stand up to that.
 

scottie

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Slight drift

I use a wolf butane torch with cutting tip for rope work on deck
It’s light but does take a short time to heat and you have to watch the hot bits
 
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