To lash or not to lash?

Quidi Vidi

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Hi, just a quick simple one this time. I currently moor to a pontoon in mid stream and up to now have always lashed my tiller 'midships, however i have read and heard that some owners don't like to do this, they leave theirs free to swing in the tide/current. I would value your opinions as to whether i should or shouldn't lash mine down. What are the pro's and cons of each method?
 

ChrisE

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FWIW, I've always lashed the wheel to centre. We sit on a swinger and I could beleive that when it gets blowy the rudder going from lock to lock, which it will do, would do the mechanism no good at all.

In fact, I can't see a good reason why you wouldn't lash to centre, but I'm here to learn....
 

VicS

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I'd always lash the tiller anyway

If on pontoon or between piles or fore and aft buoys the boat won't swing with the tide so for half the time the tide will be "the wrong way" so it'll send the rudder and tiller hard over causing unnecessary loads on the rudder if not lashed securely

Even on a swinging mooring some boats will swing back and forth through a wide angle if the tiller is not lashed.
 

Rowana

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I lash mine with bungy cord. Keeps it roughly centered, but not rock solid, and does swing just a little. Bungy acts like a sort of shock absorber.

That's my 2p worth !
 

Leighb

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I always lash the tiller even if we have only stopped for lunch, stops the irritating noise of the tiller banging about, not to mention more room in the cockpit.

Even if this did not apply - when left on a mooring for example - surely there might be inceased wear on the pintles, plus a risk of rudder damage in bumpy conditions.
 
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