Southerly 115 DS. (Series1?)

Sgeir

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Look like nice boats, but the keel looks a bit errrmm wimpy. Any views as to how they sail? Can you get reasonably close to wind? What are they like in a heavy sea?

Any views?
 

Yngmar

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The keel is fine and unproblematic if serviced. The interior is well laid out and quite spacious. However, on the 115 Mk1, the rudder is not deep enough and can lose grip in large-ish waves (see boatyard shot at http://www.yachtsnet.co.uk/archives/southerly-115/southerly-115.htm). That's why later revisions got completely redesigned twin rudders. Apart from this, they have a pretty good reputation. I almost bought one some time ago but the rudder thing put me off in the end. The slightly smaller 105 had a lifting transom-hung rudder which did not suffer from this problem, so that may be an option (she's very similar otherwise).

Edit: Forgot to mention, due to the rudder issues, several used Southerly 115s on the market have modified rudders, some well engineered, some less so. Look closely!
 
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Tidewaiter2

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Our 115 Series 2 has the single rudder mod- two 'wings' on the base of the rudder. Sails alright for us. Mind you, we've aged out of doing 12hrs on our ear just to get another knot of boat speed and tend to reef and sail it flat and take a bit longer-Gotland and back, April-Sept 2013, so varied conditions, including the Dutch Nord Zee coast 10m contour swell (you can see why they have the 'mast up' canal route when snatching passages between N/NW blows:disgust:) ).

The Series 3 and later Mks twin rudders do make reversing out of a tight marina slot 'interesting', and usually mean an 'optional extra' bow thruster is 'not', if you see what I mean;).
 

E39mad

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They are best sailed fairly flat - reef at 16/17 knots apparent. Never lost steerage as the stern is very narrow. A rudder mod was added (could be retrofitted) which put winglets near the base of the rudder to stop water falling off the rudder. Max depth is 6'8"

The Series 2 has a Rob Humphreys designed keel (8'1" fully down) and is much less intrusive that Series 1. It is much stiffer too meaning 20+ knots before reefing. Still had single rudder.
 

Cardo

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Can't beat a Southerly for spaciousness at the size. We have a 105 that we've been cruising on for the last couple of years. Compared to similarly sized boats, she's huge inside. As for sailing, well, we don't do much of that in the Med... We did pretty well whilst in the Solent, though. Be aware the older Southerlys had relatively small rigs (12m mast on an 11m boat) so it takes a stiff bit of wind (for us at least 10 kts) to get moving at a half decent speed.

Ours, as with some others, was modified by the previous owner to swap the single rudder for twin transom hung rudders. The rudders work well, though I did have to fix the bodged implementation!
 

Sgeir

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Many thanks folks, really appreciate the sharing of experience from people who know.

We have a fairly traditional looking 34' MAB GRP boat with a longish deep keel. She sails very well and can take a biggish sea without too much discomfort. However, as we get older, comfort and things like views while "indoors" of an evening, especially in our northern climes, seem to become more important.

Also, our present stowage space is restricted, the berths are on the short side, and it's just not quite right for children and their children - too Spartan below, and not a lot of space. The Southerly 115 looks like a nice interior with loads of space, but just not sure about how they'd handle in a blow. I really appreciate the comments about the rudder; this could be significant in our sailing area, the west coasts of Scotland and Ireland.

The idea of lifting the keel for shallow waters is attractive, but not critical. We are used to deepish keel sailing, which really is why I raised the keel issue. Everything in sailing, especially cruising, is a compromise. Maybe I'll hang on for a year or two until I finally give up any pretence of even part-time employment..... I might find the ideal boat by then!

The 115 DSL looks good, but perhaps the Series 1 is not quite what we want. Many thanks to all for your advice and counsel; we might look at later editions.
 

Sgeir

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Many thanks folks, really appreciate the sharing of experience from people who know.

We have a fairly traditional looking 34' MAB GRP boat with a longish deep keel. She sails very well and can take a biggish sea without too much discomfort. However, as we get older, comfort and things like views while "indoors" of an evening, especially in our northern climes, seem to become more important.

Also, our present stowage space is restricted, the berths are on the short side, and it's just not quite right for children and their children - too Spartan below, and not a lot of space. The Southerly 115 looks like a nice interior with loads of space, but just not sure about how they'd handle in a blow. I really appreciate the comments about the rudder; this could be significant in our sailing area, the west coasts of Scotland and Ireland.

The idea of lifting the keel for shallow waters is attractive, but not critical. We are used to deepish keel sailing, which really is why I raised the keel issue. Everything in sailing, especially cruising, is a compromise. Maybe I'll hang on for a year or two until I finally give up any pretence of even part-time employment..... I might find the ideal boat by then!

The 115 DSL looks good, but perhaps the Series 1 is not quite what we want. Many thanks to all for your advice and counsel; we might look at later editions.
 

Yngmar

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If you liked the layout, the deck salon views of the Southerly and the interior helm for when it's cold out, there are a few other MABs to look at. None of them are built with lifting keels and so didn't have to compromise on the rudder.

The first is the Moody Eclipse, which comes in a hard to find 38, a more cramped 33 and a very spacious 43 feet (specs: http://www.moodyowners.net/Moody_Archives/moody_archives.shtml). They have a very clever-flip up interior helm that folds down below the salon seating when not needed.

The other is the Westerly Riviera 35, which stands out with her huge windows (specs: http://sailboatdata.com/viewrecord.asp?class_id=3244). Don't remember much about this one, but read somewhere the concerns about the windows breaking when pooped were alleviated by doing a dunk test.

And lastly any 1980s Oyster DS (435 or 406 - they come in coachroof versions as well as DS, and several interior layouts). Bit larger, no interior helm, but they tend to be very well built, spacious with a nice interior and have excellent sailing abilities (generally and in heavy weather). Bit on the pricier side though.
 

E39mad

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Southerly 115 (unlike some modern Southerlies) is not a deck saloon as such - the galley up layout works very well and saloon is lower down but is both large and comfortable.

Other used boats with inside helms:

Sadler Panorama (Starlight 39 hull) - very rare
Dehler 41DS
Vancouver 34 or 38
Sovereign 40
Various Colvic Victors
Voyager 35 or 40
Cromarty 36
 

Concerto

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I can vouch that the Moody Eclipse 43 is a lovely boat to sail. My late parents owned one and I sail plenty of miles on it. It also had quite a shallow keel, so no problem with lifting mechanism. The deck salon was lovely as seated you could see almost alround the boat. Furling main and bow thruster were standard equipment, so easy to handle shorthanded.
 

Bathdave

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We bought a 115 series 3 just 12 months ago - the last version with the single rudder, with wings added, before the twin rudder series 4

I would endorse what a couple of others have said - definitely prefers to be sailed a bit more upright.

Keel is 2.6 m when down and seems to point reasonably well

There is a lot of weight downstairs, with both the castiron keel and the lump of iron in the grounding plate, which I understand will keep her well planted in a bigger sea, but makes her a bit slow I lighter winds...as someone else points out, not the biggest sail area for a boat of its length and weight

But so spacious, solid, well built, a real pleasure to be on.

We love ours
 
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