running back stays

searover

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Hi all, on a moody 37, if i rig as cutter rig at top cross trees, do i need to rig running bck stays...? as someone told me to noy bother but i can see probs if i dont am i worrying too much or what. do you lads and er!! lasses think any advice would be gratfully recieved .........
 

Jonny_H

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If your using a cutter rig then the chances are you will use the inner jib as a storm jib, and therefore you need to support the mast at the point where its forestay is located - ie running backstays.

I would rig them and use them when windy. Ours come back to just level with the start of the cockpit (Centre Cockpit 37 footer) and we leave them permanently rigged and just let the leeward one off when not needed - we do have them on caribbena hooks so can remove them easily and tie off at the mast.

Jonny
 

Becky

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We have a Moody 37, and we had an inner forestay fitted. But no, we didn't include running backstays.

2 reasons. One the mast is pretty strong in the first place and not particularly high and
second; we would only use it for a storm jib which is very small anyway.

Conversely, we have just removed the inner forestay as we have been in big winds and the boat has handled the conditions with apparent ease. A furling jib can be reduced to a small triangle easily. Not particularly close-winded, but what the h*ll, these would be survival conditions anyway.

Worse than that we would probably take off the sails and ly to a parachute anchor.

Or run off downwind with drogue and bare poles.

We have twice experienced winds of 40 knots+ and the boat revels in those conditions; heavy hull and not over-canvassed in the first place. Even in 'rough' conditions (rounding Cape Finisterre) we seemed to keep up a reasonable pace.

(I feel I shouldn't be recording these comments /forums/images/graemlins/frown.gif /forums/images/graemlins/frown.gif; could be pushing the fates somewhat.)

So, I would suggest that you try it first, and if you find that the mast is bowing forward then add the backstays. But only once it is proved necessary.

Just my opinion FWIW
 

searover

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Thanks for the advice, i was wondering whether i would get mixed responce. johny is your boat newtsvile. if it is i was admiring on friday i am at fleetwood also, so mite see you ..thanks again Roy.. and thanks to you becky well if you can manage i will thanks again....
 

john_morris_uk

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Our rigger told us it would be OK not to have runners on our masthead rig so long as the fitting for the inner forestay was not more than a certain distance from the top. This certain distance I have completely forgotten after toasting my Mother-in Law's birthday in champagne an hour or so ago.

I see tome says in another thread the distance is a foot.
 

rwoofer

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Some rigs use jumper stays (small forward pointing spreaders that stiffen a mast against forward pull) to avoid having to use running backstays. Same principle is used on catamarans to ensure the forestay tension doesn't bend the forward beam too much. The moody 44 in cutter configuration used them as standard.

Not sure why you don't see more around given the benefits.
 

FAITIRA

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I put jumpers on my last boat when I built her, they did the job but the down side is they can be hard on the foresails re chafe.
 
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