Pilotage help...

whiskeymac

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Hello everyone... I am a newbie here and in fact new to motor boating - but that is another story!...

I am taking delivery of a new (to me) boat in March - a Swift Trawler 34.
I have to bring it from Greystones Marina, Co Wicklow, to Brighton, E Sussex

I am happy to motor at night - slowly - I have full radar and chart plotter/AIS and I am familiar with using them :)

However, I anticipate doing roughly 100 nm per day - I am not in a hurry; I would like to motor in daylight if possible - for the sake of my crew - and my learning curve!

At full throttle I should be able to do about 20kts and have a range of 166nm (with a 20% reserve.)
I hope to do about 15kts and get better fuel consumption than that, taking the range to around 200nm (with a 20% reserve)

I was wondering if anyone could give me some tips on where there are convenient ports along the coast from N Wales to N Devon, and as far as Falmouth. After that I am pretty familiar with ports of call.

all the best
 

sarabande

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Welcome to the forum, Whiskymac.

Are you going along the S Wales coast, then along to the N Devon one round Lands End, or cutting across ?

N Devon coast for a Trawler 34 could be a but tricky unless you want to dry out or anchor off. What is your draft ?

Sounds as if you have commercial experience ?
 

Mr Googler

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Welcome to the forum.

Greystones to Milford Haven is 100nm

Milford Haven to Newlyn is 116nm

Padstow is another option before the corner although it’s tidal restricted access.

The tricky bit is getting round lands end but if you have the time you can just wait for a weather window. After that.....harbours and marinas are plentiful. My last boat did both of those legs with the new owner. Enjoy the trip!
 

Bouba

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Hello everyone... I am a newbie here and in fact new to motor boating - but that is another story!...

I am taking delivery of a new (to me) boat in March - a Swift Trawler 34.
I have to bring it from Greystones Marina, Co Wicklow, to Brighton, E Sussex

I am happy to motor at night - slowly - I have full radar and chart plotter/AIS and I am familiar with using them :)

However, I anticipate doing roughly 100 nm per day - I am not in a hurry; I would like to motor in daylight if possible - for the sake of my crew - and my learning curve!

At full throttle I should be able to do about 20kts and have a range of 166nm (with a 20% reserve.)
I hope to do about 15kts and get better fuel consumption than that, taking the range to around 200nm (with a 20% reserve)

I was wondering if anyone could give me some tips on where there are convenient ports along the coast from N Wales to N Devon, and as far as Falmouth. After that I am pretty familiar with ports of call.

all the best
It’s good to welcome another ST34 to the forum, soon we should have quite a fleet:) unfortunately I can’t help with your question :(
 

Seastoke

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Welcome to the forum, Whiskymac.

Are you going along the S Wales coast, then along to the N Devon one round Lands End, or cutting across ?

N Devon coast for a Trawler 34 could be a but tricky unless you want to dry out or anchor off. What is your draft ?

Sounds as if you have commercial experience ?

Where do you mean cut across , am I missing something
 

whiskeymac

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Thanks everyone for tips. I don’t have commercial experience, just many years sailing including trans Atlantic.

The draft of the ST34 is 1m. I wouldn’t fancy drying out but could probably get into Padstow if I timed it right.

Would you recommend a fender board for some of the ports mentioned?

Where would you wait for the lands end section ? And where would your first port of call be on the S coast?

?
 

Andy Cox

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This might not be of any help, but have you considered heading south to Kinsale and then making a long hop straight to either Newlyn or Falmouth?

I did that route from / to Falmouth in a RIB a few years ago. It's about 180 miles and cruising at around 22 knts took us 8 hours both ways. So if you were to do 15 knts it would be a long day at 12 hrs.

As already mentioned, the North Devon and Cornwall coast offer little in the way safe havens, other than Padstow, which although tidal, you can lock into the inner harbour.
Andy
 

henryf

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Make sure you research fuel burn rates. I would be surprised if cruising at 15 knots was much more efficient than 20 knots. At 15 knots I would have thought you'd be off or almost off the plane. Once you're properly on the plane there will probably be a straight line for a while in terms of fuel burn / mile.

The real saving comes when you cruise within the hull speed of the boat but that will be very slow in your case, probably 6 knots or so and you need to pay attention to the tidal flow because it will have more relative effect. But do your homework, there's no point in sitting around on a long journey if it isn't actually going to save fuel. The very worst thing you can do is force a boat through the water at displacement speed just prior to getting up on the plane.

Henry :)
 

whiskeymac

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Thanks Henry - points well made and taken on board.
I have gleaned the following data for fuel burn rates for a Cummins QSB6 (425hp)...
Performance Data.JPG

I am learning ... :)
 

whiskeymac

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Thanks Andy
That is a very good thought. It may have the added benefit of keeping the relative shelter of the Irish coast for longer - if one assumes that most wind/wave action will proceed from the SW....
Rgds
Russ
 

Lulla-Belle

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Refuel to the brim and possibly fill some 20Ltr drums as back up emergency @ Killmore Quay 24Hr fuel berth then straight across to Penzance for next fuel stop Penzance Service buoys outside wait for the lads dependent on tides.

Use your tidal streams to your advantage great trip.

Approx 150NM

South Coast then the world is your oyster.

Good luck great experience done it plenty times.

Stay safe -
 

Nick101

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Hi, welcome to a new ST 34. I normally cruise at 7 knots with a consumption of about 7 ltrs per hour.
At this speed live is good, you can make a coffee etc. If you expect strong wave conditions make sure that the table and chairs are secured. The table especially is very heavy and once it starts sliding it can do real damage.
Be careful with big waves in a following sea. Seawater can get in through the ventilation exhausts on the stern. Just be aware.

Good luck with the trawler. I hope you like hear as much as I do

Nick
 

Bouba

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Hi, welcome to a new ST 34. I normally cruise at 7 knots with a consumption of about 7 ltrs per hour.
At this speed live is good, you can make a coffee etc. If you expect strong wave conditions make sure that the table and chairs are secured. The table especially is very heavy and once it starts sliding it can do real damage.
Be careful with big waves in a following sea. Seawater can get in through the ventilation exhausts on the stern. Just be aware.

Good luck with the trawler. I hope you like hear as much as I do

Nick
Hi Nick, I removed the table from the boat because it is too heavy. I replaced it with small coffee tables.
When you say that big waves can get in the ventilation exhaust, do you mean the two white plastic ducts on the transom?
 

whiskeymac

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Hi, welcome to a new ST 34. I normally cruise at 7 knots with a consumption of about 7 ltrs per hour.
At this speed live is good, you can make a coffee etc. If you expect strong wave conditions make sure that the table and chairs are secured. The table especially is very heavy and once it starts sliding it can do real damage.
Be careful with big waves in a following sea. Seawater can get in through the ventilation exhausts on the stern. Just be aware.

Good luck with the trawler. I hope you like hear as much as I do

Nick

That's really helpful - many thanks. I have noted the water ingress comment.
What did you think of the performance table I posted above in this thread...does it look accurate ?

Russ
 

Bouba

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Thanks Henry - points well made and taken on board.
I have gleaned the following data for fuel burn rates for a Cummins QSB6 (425hp)...
View attachment 75821

I am learning ... :)
The top speed of 20 knots can only be done with a clean bum, end of the season 17 is about the best. Both cases 84lph, I find that 6+ knots using less than 6 lph is most economical. But give and take the chart is more or less right
 

Sneds

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We overnighted in Padstow, fuel available, and set off at dawn around Lands End for Plymouth
Good luck and enjoy the trip
 

Kawasaki

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Refuel to the brim and possibly fill some 20Ltr drums as back up emergency @ Killmore Quay 24Hr fuel berth then straight across to Penzance for next fuel stop Penzance Service buoys outside wait for the lads dependent on tides.

Use your tidal streams to your advantage great trip.

Approx 150NM

South Coast then the world is your oyster.

Good luck great experience done it plenty times.

Stay safe -

Good shout Lulla
 

Whitelighter

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Make sure you research fuel burn rates. I would be surprised if cruising at 15 knots was much more efficient than 20 knots. At 15 knots I would have thought you'd be off or almost off the plane. Once you're properly on the plane there will probably be a straight line for a while in terms of fuel burn / mile.

The real saving comes when you cruise within the hull speed of the boat but that will be very slow in your case, probably 6 knots or so and you need to pay attention to the tidal flow because it will have more relative effect. But do your homework, there's no point in sitting around on a long journey if it isn't actually going to save fuel. The very worst thing you can do is force a boat through the water at displacement speed just prior to getting up on the plane.

Henry :)

What you day is correct for a planing hull.
ST34 is really a semi-d hull that never fully gets on the plane so the faster you go, the less distance you can go as you never reach that planning point.
 

Nick101

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Hi Nick, I removed the table from the boat because it is too heavy. I replaced it with small coffee tables.
When you say that big waves can get in the ventilation exhaust, do you mean the two white plastic ducts on the transom?

Yes, I did a trip from Calvi to Antibes when we ended up in a force 7. When we checked the boat the next day we noticed that the lazarette was wet. We unscrewed the wooden flooring and found that a lot of water had collected under these boards. Most of it had drained into the bilge though through small holes made for this purpose. Also the stern thruster was soaked but after a three day drying period it all worked again.

The water did come in via the exhausts on the transom. In normal sea conditions this should not be a problem.
Also make sure that the auto pilot electronics situated on the right hand side forward of the lazarette are covered and stay dry. The salt water can really attack the electronic wires down there.

Be careful to keep the windows on the left hand side in the cabin closed when cleaning the flybridge. The water goes straight into the boat. Later boats have a modification ( a kind of gutter ) fitted above the window to divert rain and cleaning water.

The fuel consumption figures are very good. ( as long as the bottom and rudder etc are clean.

Enjoy your boat,

Regards Nick
 
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