Norscot type shaft seal - wrong oil used

2ply

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A couple of years ago I took a (then) unknown make shaft seal apart on our (then) 'new' boat, replaced the three lip seals inside, jiggled the fitting so the seals were moved away from some wear grooves, and filled it up with engine oil. All done with advice from these forums, and very smug I felt afterwards I can tell you!

Since then I've probably motored about 30 or so hrs, without any obvious ill-effects.

Just tonight, I found www.norscotshaftseal.com which looks exactly like the seal I've got. Which was a pleasing discovery, until I spotted that a) I should have filled up with automatic transmission fluid not motor oil and b) 'burped' the shaft log - neither of which I had a clue about at the time, so I didn't.

I can change the oil in the reservoir and delivery pipe fairly easily, but won't be able to get the old (wrong) oil out of the shaft seal unit itself without taking the propshaft off - which was a total nightmare last time and I'm really not keen...

What would forumites do?
 

NorthUp

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From the website "there are similar seals in your boat engine"- and they survive engine oil.

It'll be fine!
 

VicS

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Burping the air out after fitting or relaunching etc is probably more important that using ATF rather than engine oil
 

rob2

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Sorry to bust in, but I have a similar type of seal with a reservoir with "Vire" embossed on it. Does anyone know anything about these? I tried contacting the guy who rebuilds Vire engines and he knows nothing about it and the most likely original supplier, Fairways Marine, have gone out of business. As far as I can see, if I replavce the hose and the lip seals it is effectively good as new.

Rob.
 

vyv_cox

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The majority of ATFs are hydrocarbons based, with a complex additive package that is needed in automotive automatic transmissions. Most of these additives are not needed for a low power duty such as a stern gland. This type of ATF is compatible with engine oil and if you use a good quality diesel engine lubricant it will probably include sufficient additives to protect whatever the ATF was intended for.
 

2ply

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Reassuring noises in response to a problem - I like it, thanks folks! :)

Given the knowledge you've imparted, I wonder if the ATF's low viscosity is anything to do with the reason it's used. I had awful trouble getting rid of an airlock in the oil delivery tube between seal unit and header tank using motor oil (very cold), whereas thinner ATF might run down the tube and get to where it's needed more easily?
 
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