Jackstay deck fittings

Bald_Dad

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2 Sep 2006
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OK boys and girls, help needed again please.

I want to fit jackstays to my Countess 28. I have the webbing, looped and stitched at each end. I can access under the GRP deck at the appropriate places. Going well so far then. First question - some boats I have seen use U bolts as the deck fittings ie 2 holes will be needed per fitting. Others use an eye bolt ie a ring with a single hole. Is either to be preferred, and if so why?

Second question, what size of backing plates should I be looking at, and what materials should I use/avoid for these?

Many thanks in anticipation.
 

poter

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Jackstays are a pain as they always get in the way if you are not careful in fitting them & the fixing points.
I personally do not like bolts, eyes etc. on the deck - more likely to trip you over than be of use, I always try and use what is already on the boat & anyway you are only going to rig Jackstays when you need them, not as permanent fittings.
On my old Moody it was easy as she had a slotted metal rail at the deck/hull joint so the jackstay fitting was easy. Moody
But the Dufour has a teak rubbing strip only. She does have a fixing point forward of the mast which is a deck Samson post, so that is my front fix, I also prefer a centre fix as well which is a ring on the Mast, I know it means an unbuckle & re-buckle but the added security and less flap in the jackstay is preferable IMO. I do have two very good Wichard snap shackles on my harness so I am always clipped on.
At the cockpit end I bring the Jackstay over onto a U bolt, bolted thru the main cockpit bulkhead, so I get into the cockpit and I am still shackled.
One more point I only now use 1 Jackstay in the center of the boat to keep me on board.

If you do have to resort to bolts make sure they are the U-type with a nice large backing plate to spread the load & try and take them at a reinforced point.

good luck. /forums/images/graemlins/wink.gif

poter
 

MoodySabre

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I also have a Moody and a toe rail fixing at the front. My webbing straps are fixed to a small u-bolt on the rear end of the outside of coaming and they are very tight, flat to the sides all the way to the front fixing by the pulpit. If you need a front fixing then putting it near the edge will prevent a trip and the straps should stay very flat, depending on the shape of your deck of course. I clip on to a SS ring that slides along the webbing so I can clip on from the cockpit and walk all the way forward.
 

PeterGibbs

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For all the othe good reasons given here, it's also best to avoid putting in a deck bolt/U bolt where water will pass - better on a sheltered deckhead fitting. This way leakage below is avoided. Drilling through toerails is not recommended nor necessary for a good fit.

On a small boat a central line is usually best, rather than one each side of the mast. When in use, tension etc should be such that you cannot fall through the guardrails, if you loose your balance - seems obvious but should be checked out.

Glad to see you using web - 100% better than wire, but sunlight destroys webbed lines faster than you can believe. I stow mine when not required, and have easy to remove fittings for this purpose.

PWG
 
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