How to turn a Traditional Motorsailer into a Sailing Boat

doug748

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Wow. Are we in danger of getting a replacement for the mythical Andersen 22?

We once overtook Drum downwind in light airs off Cloch Point. But that doesn’t prove that a 32 foot Westerly Fulmar is faster than an 80 foot ex-Whitbread ocean racer. Just that in very exceptional circumstances, extreme sail set and trim can make more difference. We had both borne off onto a run, and we immediately let the main right out and goose winged.
Meanwhile the pro-skipper on Drum kept his mainsail pinned tight in (with no foresail set) - as he had decided that with his mate serving champagne to the paying guests, now was not the time to fiddle with running backstays, boom across the cockpit and setting up a preventer.
Being the Clyde, 10 minutes later the wind had changed to a reach - and the mate had put down her tray of champagne flutes. They eased the mainsail out and shot off into the distance.

Certainly done a great job on the rig. But can‘t defeat the laws of hydrodynamics.
So perhaps need to be careful before a “Colvic 32“ becomes used as instead of “Anderson 22” - fine vessels though both are.

Anderson 22 vanquished?

As I always say, to the point of boring people I am sure, the best way to amaze people with the agility of your chosen boat is to race, more specifically, enter the Round the Island race and see how you get on. The results are published for all to admire.

Now then, I once overtook a Sunfast 32 in my old steamer, straight fight, remember it well but he beat me by over an hour : -(

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fredrussell

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What LF fails to say is that as he overtook the Pogo 30 on that infamous day, he himself was being overtaken by an Anderson 22. I know all this because I was overtaking the Anderson 22 in my 6ft pram dinghy, rowing frantically. If you don’t believe me ask my wife - she was on water skis behind my dinghy.
 

Laminar Flow

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I do understand that the definition of a race is two sailing boats on the same body of water within sight of one another. On the whole, we do not embarrass ourselves too often and, unless very close hauled, we seem to keep up well enough with most cruising boats our size.

On a few occasions we had the opportunity to properly spar with other motorsailers, in what would be a more proper apples with apples comparison.

From St. Malo to St Quay Portrieux we beat a standard rigged CW 35 by 2 hrs over 30 miles.

Leaving Crinnan towards Oban we had a race with a French Nauticat 35 sloop, the crew of which we had befriended on passage through the canal. They had had a fast passage from St. Malo to the Scillies and were keen for a challenge. Thierry had asked us several times how our tub sailed; I know he didn't believed us. The route through the islands offered several different courses to the wind for good variety.
In the end it wasn't even close. We left them behind almost immediately. After 25 miles and as we turned into our anchorage just south of Oban, they were so far back, we had trouble making them out with the Binoculars.

What LF fails to say is that as he overtook the Pogo 30 on that infamous day, he himself was being overtaken by an Anderson 22. I know all this because I was overtaking the Anderson 22 in my 6ft pram dinghy, rowing frantically. If you don’t believe me ask my wife - she was on water skis behind my dinghy.
And spilled our tea in your wake! Shame on you...
 

oldmanofthehills

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I agree, I think Laminar Flow has done a great job in modifying his boat to meet his needs . Hopefully, it may give other motorsailor's confidence to make changes if they want to.

With regard to weather , the world has moved on from plastic macs and duffle coats.
Hi tec clothing has somewhat transformed sailing in places like the UK. Add perhaps a sprayhood and there is no real need to be cold, wet and sweaty .
Take yet another rainy night and irish sea chop with an eddie the auto groaning and twitching and generally failing to helm true, and suddenly even the doghouse seemed a poor solution

If you want to sail round the buoys a sprayhood is fine, but if you want to cross seas or even oceans in 55N latitude damp weather then you look to other solutions

Some of course sail to escape family but it encourages my beloved if she and her charts are kept warm and dry and I relish her company
 

Laminar Flow

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When we crossed from the Scillies to Cork, some 140 NM, it was absolutely bucketing down all night, the water cascading off the sails and no matter the calendar swore up and down it were Summer, it quite clearly had to be a dirty lie.
Silly me sat inside, of course, when I could have been outside in the cockpit, safely clad in some synthetic skin and enjoying the spectacular waterfall shooting off the bimini. Why does rain always feel wetter at night?

I know that cozy feeling well, climbing into the still wet, salt-encrusted foulies at the beginning of every watch, when on passage and the moisture, brought in with every change of the deck watch, encourages the fresh undies, safely cocooned in their drawers, to grow a warm pelt of mold.

The glory of proper yachting, I shall not miss it.
 
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