Glasses for sailing

Laundryman

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Do you wear your normal prescription glasses when sailing ( mine are varifocals ) or have you found something more suitable. I am thinking perhaps something with more side protection and transition lenses. I need to replace my glasses so any advice is welcome before I shell out more money. Thank you
 

Victoria Sponge

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Do you wear your normal prescription glasses when sailing ( mine are varifocals ) or have you found something more suitable. I am thinking perhaps something with more side protection and transition lenses. I need to replace my glasses so any advice is welcome before I shell out more money. Thank you

I wear glasses with varifocal/transitional lenses. They do an excellent job.
 

prv

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I wear my normal glasses - I only have the one pair. Never felt the need for tinting, transitions, etc. Side protection from what? Salt on the lenses is a problem, and the only reason I'd consider getting laser treatment although I probably won't as the idea scares me :)

Pete
 

Channel Sailor

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I find the transition lenses are a problem on a small boat. They are too dark when you pop your head down to look at the chart table, and do not work very well when the sun is low in the sky. My favorite frames for sun glassed are Oakleys, no metal parts, with a part wrap. Even used them for dinghy sailing and unplanned swimming and they stayed on my head. When brightness eases I switch to a non tinted cheap plastic framed sturdy pair.
 

richardbayle

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I have varifocal with transition and altho' I don't have any problem going below from a sunny cockpit, I do have real problems if I have to do anything in the engine or bending down as I find I'm always looking in the wrong part of the lens. This does not help with sea sickness!

So I have reverted to two pairs one varifocal with transition lenses for up top and general day to day use and a pair of reading glasses for upside down in the engine room work and chart work much happier now!

No probs with salt or sun from the side. My wife uses prescription "Maui Jims" and swears by them

Never can remember where I put which pair tho'.
 

LittleShip

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I wear my normal glasses - I only have the one pair. Never felt the need for tinting, transitions, etc. Side protection from what? Salt on the lenses is a problem, and the only reason I'd consider getting laser treatment although I probably won't as the idea scares me :)

Pete

Did the laser treatment years ago..... still think it was worth while especially for sailing, although these days I stand in a cabin and dont suffer from salt spray :)

Tom
 

bbg

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Do you wear your normal prescription glasses when sailing ( mine are varifocals ) or have you found something more suitable. I am thinking perhaps something with more side protection and transition lenses. I need to replace my glasses so any advice is welcome before I shell out more money. Thank you

Yes. Laser surgery. The only regret that you will have is that you didn't do it years earlier.
 

vyv_cox

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I've worn contact lenses for many years. Wonderful little bits of plastic. Wear them always. Despite swimming. surfing, dinghy racing etc in them, I have only ever lost two, the last one about 30 years ago.
 

prv

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Have thought about ski goggles and my normal glasses..wipe clean when in storms etc

Yep, worn them in a mate's RIB, work well. Also took them (together with the matching neoprene face shield that left no skin exposed) on a Baltic delivery in February, but didn't need them.

Pete
 

Giblets

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I am sure I read somewhere that you can actually get prescription lenses in ski goggles. Hate to think how much they cost though! :eek:
 

snooks

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Spending a lot of my time on the water, when my vision has to be pretty good, I can say that going over to contact lenses was the best decision for me.

As a glasses wearer you don't know how many people wear contacts, you only see the person on the train that is having trouble, you don't see the other 20 people in the carriage who are wearing them trouble free.

I have prescription Oakey sunglasses which I'll wear when it's sunny and there's no spray to worry about. If the weather looks alright and I'm sailing for a few days I'll wear glasses, but if there is any rain or spray around then it's daily disposable contacts. The cheap ones from http://www.daysoftcontactlenses.com/

If I'm just day sailing I'll wear contacts, but for night watches, I'll go over to glasses, so I don't spend too much time sleeping in them.
 

westernman

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I have varifocal with transition and altho' I don't have any problem going below from a sunny cockpit, I do have real problems if I have to do anything in the engine or bending down as I find I'm always looking in the wrong part of the lens.

I have exactly the same problem with varifocals. I used to use transitions, and had no problems with them but have now reverted to a pair without and a pair of varifocal sunglasses.

So I have reverted to two pairs one varifocal with transition lenses for up top and general day to day use and a pair of reading glasses for upside down in the engine room work and chart work much happier now!

No probs with salt or sun from the side. My wife uses prescription "Maui Jims" and swears by them

Never can remember where I put which pair tho'.

I can never find the right pair when I need to work on something either.
The worst is in the locker behind the navigation station trying to read the labels close up which are above my head on the charger.
 

AntarcticPilot

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I've worn contact lenses for the last 30 years, and under no circumstances would I consider using glasses for everyday wear (I now need to use them over my contact lenses for close work; penalty of growing older!). The difference in vision between glasses and contact lenses is enormous; glasses simply aren't in the same class.

I happen to have complex vision problems that mean that in any case, glasses don't correct my vision very well (indeed, right now I can't use glasses), but my experience is that if you change to contact lenses you'll never want to use glasses again. The difference in clarity, brightness and field of vision is vast - and the more short sighted you are, the bigger the advantage. Oh, and you don't need to keep taking them off and polishing them!

I'm wary of laser surgery, but it is probably a good answer for some people whose vision is stable and who don't require too extreme a correction. It isn't suitable in my case.
 

DownWest

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A new one for me was sunglasses with little oval insert lenses in the lower part for reading. €30 at the local marina. Choice of correction.
A
 

Searush

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I am lucky in that I have one eye long sighted & one short so I can manage without glasses 90% of the time. I have several cheap reading glasses (pound shop specials) lying around that I can grab for small text or in bad light.

Apparently, it is a common technique for laser correction to make eyes "one long, one short" so that people can deal with normal conditions without any glasses. If you go for correction, thin about it. Also, I am told that Laser treatment for older people is not that long term as the eyes continue to deteriorate. I was advised it would be a waste of time for me when I was 60.
 

neilf39

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I use my normal varifocals with a neoprene strap to stop me throwing them overboard. Normally fine but do fog up with salt spray around. I can't wear contact lenses as no matter what I tried I ended up seeing double every so often after I blinked. Made driving an interesting experience.

I also use these:

http://www.dixoneyewear.com/product.php/20/rx-1-prescription-glasses-goggles-with-gasket

with my prescription fitted. Use as normal sunglasses or fit the strap and insert for googles. Excellent on the water for bright days and cycling etc. Prescription range is limited though.

Regards
Neil
 
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