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How hard is it to pass BSS exam?

ralph s3

New member
Joined
10 May 2021
Messages
1
Hi,

I'm looking at buying a Larson 240 (similar to a Bayliner 2455 or Sea Ray 240). She has spent most of her life in Lymington so has never had a BSS certificate although she is a UK delivered boat with CE marking. I have been reading up the BSS requirements and I'm starting to get concerned that it could be cost prohibitive to get thru the examination. It doesn't have gas so that's one section I don't need to worry about. I'm also aware it needs to not mix oil drips into the bilge water and I think I can satisfy this with a drip tray. However, there seem to be lots of onerous items around the type of fuel tank, vents, routing of the fuel line and acceptable standards for fuel lines. In a previous survey the surveyor noted "the fuel tank is mostly inaccessible for close examination but, overview inspected from the engine space, appeared to be substantially sound and secure". Will that provide enough access for an examiner to pass the boat? I don't see anyway of improving access short of cutting access panels. Anything else that trips up sports boats of this type.

Thx...Ralph
 

Ian E

New member
Joined
22 Apr 2015
Messages
18
Location
Marlow, UK
Its all possible. I bought a boat from Poole last year that I now use on the Thames and so required the BSS.

Fuel lines I had changed for the correct type but I don't recall an issue with the tank.
If a drip tray can't be installed in the bilge then a filter in the bilge line is OK.
Make sure batteries are secure and terminals covered.
Apply stickers for batteries, fuel, etc.
Replace Carbon monoxide detectors, fire extinguishers and fire blanket.

I did most of the items myself after reading trough the BSS list that is available online.

My best advise is to find a recommended/friendly BSS tester from someone in your area.
 

plumbob

Active member
Joined
18 Oct 2009
Messages
361
Location
Bucks
Hi,

I'm looking at buying a Larson 240 (similar to a Bayliner 2455 or Sea Ray 240). She has spent most of her life in Lymington so has never had a BSS certificate although she is a UK delivered boat with CE marking. I have been reading up the BSS requirements and I'm starting to get concerned that it could be cost prohibitive to get thru the examination. It doesn't have gas so that's one section I don't need to worry about. I'm also aware it needs to not mix oil drips into the bilge water and I think I can satisfy this with a drip tray. However, there seem to be lots of onerous items around the type of fuel tank, vents, routing of the fuel line and acceptable standards for fuel lines. In a previous survey the surveyor noted "the fuel tank is mostly inaccessible for close examination but, overview inspected from the engine space, appeared to be substantially sound and secure". Will that provide enough access for an examiner to pass the boat? I don't see anyway of improving access short of cutting access panels. Anything else that trips up sports boats of this type.

Thx...Ralph
It's almost worth getting an examiner along to give you a list of what needs doing before you start trying to second guess what might be needed. Speak to him first and get the cost of the retest. Unfortunately there appear to still be grey areas in the BSS so find a decent bloke and use him.
 

GAJ52

Member
Joined
23 Jul 2013
Messages
200
My experience is that it seem to depend on the examiners pet subjects. I have had my Birchwood on the Thames for 12 years and the BSS examiner passed my boat each time with only a few very minor observations. On his retirement he recommended a new examiner who I used for the next BSS check, but this guy was obsessed with ventilation and nearly failed my BSS certificate because of the lack of (in his view) proper ventilation. My boat was built in 1990 and has passed the BSS certificated all those years with no modification to the manufacturers designed ventilation system, but this guy said it was inadequate ??

I don't know how to choose a sensible and realistic BSS examiner, but I won't be using the last one, that's for sure.

Glen
 

Actionmat

Well-known member
Joined
13 Dec 2012
Messages
8,826
Location
Teddington
Paul Killick was the last BSS examiner on my boat. A fountain of knowledge and a good bloke. I enjoyed picking his brains as he picked my Broom apart, told me what needed to be done and the end result was a boat with a BSS and an owner with a better understanding of his own boat.
 

Dave_Seager

Member
Joined
4 Jul 2001
Messages
757
Location
Weybridge, UK
Another common item is changing from glass fuel filter bowls to metal. It is not particularly difficult nor expensive but it irritating as you cannot look for water any longer.
 

CJL

Member
Joined
27 May 2010
Messages
477
Location
London
Another common item is changing from glass fuel filter bowls to metal. It is not particularly difficult nor expensive but it irritating as you cannot look for water any longer.
Dave,
Is plastic allowed at all?
C
 

ctva

Well-known member
Joined
8 Apr 2007
Messages
3,730
Another common item is changing from glass fuel filter bowls to metal. It is not particularly difficult nor expensive but it irritating as you cannot look for water any longer.
Only if the filter is in the engine compartment. Better if you can to move the filter and keep the glass bowl.
 

Dave_Seager

Member
Joined
4 Jul 2001
Messages
757
Location
Weybridge, UK
The metal bowl is commonly used as it is a simple, screw-on replacement for the glass bowl.

The following is from the 2005 documentation:
"Check all fuel filters (including drain plugs) located inside engine spaces are marked or recognised as fire resistant. If not marked or recognised as being suitably fire resistant, verify this by examining any presented declaration from the manufacturer or supplier.
"Fuel filters (including drain plugs) located inside engine spaces must have intrinsic fire resistance of at least 21⁄2 minutes at 600ºC (1112ºF).
"Note – All-metal fuel filters are considered ‘sufficiently fire resistant’. Fuel filters marked with ISO 10088 are acceptable."
 

**wilkie**

New member
Joined
19 Sep 2019
Messages
2
Paul Killick passed mine yesterday. It's the first boat I've prepared for the BSS and it was a complete refit including electrics so I'm pleased it passed first time.
From all the local examiners to me, he was the only one that a) reliably replied to my messages and b) was good to his word on timings.
All arranged remotely via email so I didn't meet him but I've heard lots of positive comments.
 

joejo

Member
Joined
29 Jul 2007
Messages
166
Location
Surrey
Another
Paul Killick passed mine yesterday. It's the first boat I've prepared for the BSS and it was a complete refit including electrics so I'm pleased it passed first time.
From all the local examiners to me, he was the only one that a) reliably replied to my messages and b) was good to his word on timings.
All arranged remotely via email so I didn't meet him but I've heard lots of positive comments.
Another vote for Paul. He has done a few BSS's for me and have been very pleased with all his advise and guidance. Decent guy who understands boats and the requirements of the BSS
 

mlines

Active member
Joined
31 Aug 2009
Messages
2,036
Location
Finchampstead, Wokingham, Berks
For the bilge pump and oily sump water either disable the bilge pump or use an oil capture filter on the output. Our "sea boat" just needed the oil filter, the fuel pipes rotating so the examiner can read the type rating and some labels renewing on the isolating switch door. It also needed an extra fire extinguisher as the built in Engine compartment one "doesn't count" and it required two. So I borrowed an extra one and left it on the boat during the test
 
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