What were they doing there?

30boat

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Brighton_and_Shoreham_RNLI_launch_to_yacht_May_27_Creditjpg_e_abda684b8685a1a997298256d576b3d6.jpg

Were they caught out?
 

Resolution

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Based on the number of seagulls in attendance, I would hazard a guess that the lifeboat had been out to do some moonlight trawling and was cleaning their nets before returning to base.


[Tongue firmly in cheek - RNLI crew do a pretty unpleasant job at times and it must be a source of comfort to all of us that they can be there to help in times of trouble.]
 
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Seajet

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I've seen photo's of much bigger waves, but I think that's the nastiest looking sea I have ever seen.

I knew someone who had a Lochin 33 fishing boat in Brighton, and he said " as a port of refuge, forget it" - which is fine if one has the choice of course.

Reflected waves, & nasty shoaling seabed where nature didn't think there should be a harbour.

Wasn't a Contessa 32 lost there - trying to enter - a few years ago ?
 

Glisferox

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It was a MOB, with a crew member clipped on and hanging over the side. Brighton and Newhaven lifeboats in attendance with a Coastguard helicopter too. They got him in and all was well as far as I heard.

One of the berthing masters told me that a 42ft 1930s long keeler had been knocked down in the entrance that afternoon as well.

The picture time says 14.51, LW was 13.00 and the wind was about F8.
 

Vern

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I posted this event a day or two ago on here, the skipper was flushed overboard, resulting in hypothermia and shock.
The yacht was brought back to Brighton Marina safely.

I think it was Wednesday on the evening BBC South news.
 

Laura Nineham

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We covered this on the sea rescues section of our website - a skipper was thrown overboard when his yacht was battered by high waves. It happened Thursday afternoon

The skipper was using a safety line, but he was suspended over the side and the crew couldn't lift him back on board.

The RNLI Brighton lifeboat crew helped him back onboard safely

You can read the story on our website
 

Elessar

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We covered this on the sea rescues section of our website - a skipper was thrown overboard when his yacht was battered by high waves. It happened Thursday afternoon

The skipper was using a safety line, but he was suspended over the side and the crew couldn't lift him back on board.

The RNLI Brighton lifeboat crew helped him back onboard safely

You can read the story on our website

wow a scary story. doesnt bear thinking about what the skipper felt like. a great result in the end though.

And it shows that harnesses are the answer and undoubtedly saved the skipper. He will be considering the length of his and where the attachment point is in future one would think.

BUT.......

the press release STILL banged on about the importance of lifejackets!!! yet the lifejacket clearly made no difference whatsoever.
 

Highland Bear

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On the other hand....

Elessar say,

"BUT.......

the press release STILL banged on about the importance of lifejackets!!! yet the lifejacket clearly made no difference whatsoever."

It might have done had the only way to free the skipper and stop him drowning alongside the boat would have been to cut the safety line. You never know....
 

Searush

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On the other "other hand"

If wearing an auto & going over like that, the inflated jacket is more likely to hinder rescue than assist it. That's when cutting free may well become the prefferred option.

However, with a weak crew on the vessel & a man loose in the water, RNLI skipper has a nasty choice to make & might have to leave boat to its own devices while he picks up MOB, by then the boat & remaining crewmember could well be overwhelmed.

All in all, the lifeline is absolutley the right choice & may well have saved 2 lives as there was no need to leave the ship to save the man.
 

30boat

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I'm still curious as to why they were out in those conditions.Did those weather conditions happened suddenly,weren't they forecast? Where were they coming from?
 

Highland Bear

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If wearing an auto & going over like that, the inflated jacket is more likely to hinder rescue than assist it. That's when cutting free may well become the prefferred option.

However, with a weak crew on the vessel & a man loose in the water, RNLI skipper has a nasty choice to make & might have to leave boat to its own devices while he picks up MOB, by then the boat & remaining crewmember could well be overwhelmed.

All in all, the lifeline is absolutley the right choice & may well have saved 2 lives as there was no need to leave the ship to save the man.

I absolutely agree with you Searush on the need to wear lifelines in conditions like that.
 

Fr J Hackett

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The offshore conditions whilst not pleasant do not look to be dangerous, it's been said F7 to F8 SW so they would have been broad reaching / running in strong winds not a problem for a Contessa 32. The entrance however would have been a very different prospect with the reflected waves, it is known for it and is mentioned in pilotage notes so the question "what were they doing there" is appropriate and with hindsight or even forsight entering the marina should not have been the option but the alternatives may have been or at least seemed much worse at the time, I for one am not going to cast any stones as most of my windows have allready been broken.
 

SailBobSquarePants

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The offshore conditions whilst not pleasant do not look to be dangerous, it's been said F7 to F8 SW so they would have been broad reaching / running in strong winds not a problem for a Contessa 32. The entrance however would have been a very different prospect with the reflected waves, it is known for it and is mentioned in pilotage notes so the question "what were they doing there" is appropriate and with hindsight or even forsight entering the marina should not have been the option but the alternatives may have been or at least seemed much worse at the time, I for one am not going to cast any stones as most of my windows have allready been broken.

The problem there is a lack of good alternatives that are close (Chichester bar - not really any better!), and of course the need to get in and get rested for a race the next day...
 
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