Twistle Rig

G

Guest

Guest
We are planning to do the ARC next year and I seem to recall an article about the twistle rig, as a short handed crew, it sounded good. Can anyone tell me where I can get more information?
 

ccscott49

Active member
Joined
7 Sep 2001
Messages
18,585
Dont know where you can see the setup, but its very effective. Basically its two yankees or high cut genoas, on the same roller reefing or forestay(s), with two spinnaker poles, connected to the clews, with sheets, the inboard ends of the poles are connected together, (I had a special attachment made up) with topping lifit and down hauls. The poles are free to swing back and forth, the whole arrangement being controlled by the sheets as you would one sail, you can sail directly down wind and to a broad reach with this system and its works well, if you have roller reefing with two grooves as I have, I haul both sails together, they can then be reefed together without probs, the poles can stay connected, I hope this is a help, there are lots of ways to rig it and I'm sure there are more people who will help on this forum! Best of luck! If you have a cutter with boom staysail, its even easier!
 

Laurence

New member
Joined
4 Aug 2003
Messages
0
Someone on the Isle of Wight has has made something of a speciality of it. Not quite sure who but try Spencers Rigging. If not them they may know who it is.

I am sure I am not alone in wanting to know more about the praticalities of this rig so I hope you take the time to post the results of your investigations on the Scuttlebutt forum.
 
G

Guest

Guest
Re: Ratsey & Lapthorn

Thank you James, I was sure it was your article. Am I correct in the article you thought it was a good system?
 

jamesjermain

Active member
Joined
16 May 2001
Messages
2,723
Location
Cargreen, Cornwall
Re: Ratsey & Lapthorn

Actually it was Peter Nielsen who did the writing but I was part of the research team.

My personal view is that it is a good system and worth having if you think you will be doing a lot of down wind running in reasonably strong winds - ie a Trade WInd crossing of the Atlantic. Its great advantage is that, once up, it needs very little tending, is very stable and extremely forgiving of poor trim, sailing by the lee etc.

On the other hand, it takes time to set up and the kit needs to be stowed somewhere when not it use. It is quite efficient, but not as good, in my view, as twin polled genoas and certainly not as effective as a spinnaker. But few cruising people want to fly one of these for days on end - too tiring and nerve wracking. I'm not a great fan of cruising chutes in general though I have sailed with some - more assymetric spinnakers than cruising chutes which work quite well.

JJ
 
Top