Sorry But Its another Colregs Question

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Whilst sailing mainly on the river Medway I have always observed and thought that if a vessel wants to let you know he's there he would sound one long blast. Whether he was approaching a bend or if he wanted you to know he was coming. However someone has pointed out to me that there is no direct ref to that in the Colregs. The regs are definate about it 34(e) on a bend, but not if directly in sight. Help me out guys/ gals because I know you love a good ColRegs question, BTW I'm being serious here.
 

alant

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One 'long blast' on a bend, this is under Rules 9(f) & 34(e), state that you must sound a prolonged blast when nearing a blind bend in a channel (4-6 seconds duration).
This is similar, but not the same as the sound signals for 'restricted visibility' for power driven vessels (a prolonged blast not more than 2 minute interval). For sail, this would be 2long+1short blast.
 

graham

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Alant ,You have made a typing error ,as Im sure you know the sound signal for a yacht under sail is one long and two shorts.

Confusingly this signal is used by several groups of vessels eg sailing,fishing ,not under command pushing or towing ,constrained by draught,and restricted in the ability to maneuvre.

So all this signal tells you is that the vessel is not an ordinary power driven vessel and treat with caution.

It is perfectly correct to sound one long blast if approaching a blind bend and to reply with the same.

The other horn signal "The Wake Up"is 5 or more short blasts .Generally it means I have right of way so get out of my way.
 

TonyTitch

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Your question is not clear on why you would want to let anyone know you are there,particularly if there is no visibility problem. Rule 34(d) enables you to sound "five short and rapid blasts" if the intentions of the other vessel are not clear. A single blast in good visibility could be interpreted as "I am altering my course to starboard" -Rule 34(a), and is probably best avoided, unless that is really your intention.
 
G

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Tony, I have read my own post and its confusing.I am referring to signals in good vis. I understand about 1 long blast when nearing bend, I also understand about 5 short blasts when "intentions" are not understood. What I have noticed is commercial traffic in clear vis and can see a vessel ahead then sounding 1 long blast. i.e I'm in a rescue boat in the fairway with vessel coming up astern of me, at that point he would normally sound 1 long blast. Question,,, where is it in the ColRegs???
 

trev

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Like I said before - under rule 36. This vessel is using one prolonged blast to attract attention. He is obviously not in fog or approaching a bend so presumably the signal cannot be confused with any other.

Trev
 

steviewhitts

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Just got back from a week away (work not sailing) and picked up this post. All threads seem about right - the sounding of one prolonged blast is only for vessels approaching a bend or other obstructions ....... however, as you say local port regs often include one prolonged blast as a general warning signal. In Plymouth the ferries are required to sound PB before they back out of Millbay docks into the fairway. From experience at sea as a watchkeeper some vessels "adopt" their own version of the rules which provided they cannot be misunderstood get accepted as convention in an area after a while - this may be the case here or it may be a local Port Regulation.
 

aztec

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this is probably a daft question.. but where do these rules appear and how do i get a copy? please bear with me as i've not been able to sort out any training yet, i'm trying to gleen info from the site, cheers, steve.
 

steviewhitts

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The RYA do a very good booklet on the IRPCS - International Regulations for Preventing Collision at Sea - it has reasonable practical explanations of how the ColRegs apply to small craft and is only about £5 - £6. Probably details on their website - www.rya.org.uk. There is also usually a set of ColRegs in each Nautical Almanac (Reeds etc) or get a copy from your local library. Good luck.
 
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