Problem at the top of the Furler

LadyInBed

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When I hoist my foresail, the shackle fouls the top of the furler 'wrap stop' (Profurl), so I can't get the luff as tight as I would like.
The installation diagram shows the bar (A) above the furler 'wrap stop'.
If I bend the bar (A) out away from the furler, when the halyard is pulled it tries to bend / angle / distort the top furler swivel (B) making it difficult for it to slide up furler tube.

Any ideas for a solution?

Furler%20top.png
 

pvb

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What's the purpose of "A"? I'd normally expect to see the halyard shackled direct to the swivel.
 

MoodySabre

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Undo the foot of the sail and pull it further up the foil. Then the swivel will go up to the stop.

My boat overcomes wrapping by having a diverter on the mast several inches below the sheave so that the halyard angle is increased and is away from the foil. I guess the point of A is prevent the halyard and the swivel from rubbing on each other and wrapping.

Or has the foil come adrift at the bottom and slid up the forestay?
 

PlankWalker

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Not an easy thing to do, though I could lengthen it with a short strop, but it would still an issue getting the shackle past the wrap stop.
I shortened mine, it was getting chock a block. Just remove one machine screw, slide out strip, cut to length, drill new hole in strip, re assemble.
 

VicS

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I'm reluctant to shorten the bar, Profurl must have designed it that way for a reason (you would hope)!

Looking at it again it is clear that the problem is caused by the length of the sail luff.

It's your sailmaker's fault for making the sail slightly too large for the Profurl. Instruct him to alter the sail so that it fits the spar properly.
 

MoodySabre

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Looking at it again it is clear that the problem is caused by the length of the sail luff.

It's your sailmaker's fault for making the sail slightly too large for the Profurl. Instruct him to alter the sail so that it fits the spar properly.

He's made too short in the luff hasn't he? The swivel needs to be higher.
 

VicS

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He's made too short in the luff hasn't he? The swivel needs to be higher.

Possibly but the OP seems to think (#7) that there would be an issue getting the shackle past the "wrap stop"
 

LadyInBed

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Looking at it again it is clear that the problem is caused by the length of the sail luff.

It's your sailmaker's fault for making the sail slightly too large for the Profurl. Instruct him to alter the sail so that it fits the spar properly.
As in #4, I could raise the foot, but I don't think it would get the shackle over the wrap stop with tension on the halyard.
 

PuffTheMagicDragon

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When I hoist my foresail, the shackle fouls the top of the furler 'wrap stop' (Profurl), so I can't get the luff as tight as I would like.

Why would you want the luff to be very tight?

I can understand that when the sail is hanked onto the forestay but not when the sail is threaded into a furler. Both Facnor (on my previous boat) and Goiot (present) advise very clearly against too much halyard tension, barely removing the wrinkles along the luff; those little ones that remain will disappear as soon as the sail starts to draw. When you have a furler, the aluminium profile will hold the luff edge in a smooth line because, unlike the case with hanks, there are no gaps along that length. Sag is controlled solely by forestay tension, not the halyard.

I would still put a halyard diverter on the front of the mast so as to pull the line away from the plastic doughnut at the head of the profile, However, I think that the main cause of your problem is that too much tension is holding the halyard too tightly against the furler, thus serving as a brake.

Something like this can easily be pop-rivetted to the mast around halfway down between the sheave and the top of the furler and will serve the purpose:

RF49911.jpg
 

VicS

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...or "lengthen" it with a strop... thinking a short length of rigging wire with an eye at each end... (on my boat I have one of these to protect against forestay failure -- no idea what they correct term for them is.. :eek: )

See #7
 
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