New Radar/plotter, or scanner plus MDU.

doris

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After a lightning strike I am getting new radar and chart plotter.
Choice is between Raymarine E95, Furuno TZ2 and B&G Zeus.
Since whichever I choose should see out my ownership of the boat I want the most 'future proof ' as well as easiest piece of kit.
Wasn't intending to go broadband with the scanner.

Comments, help in choosing, anyone????
 

jac

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Would suggest looking again at "next gen" scanners

whilst they do lose some theoretical range the additional definition they have at close range is very useful in murky conditions, allowing you to pick out individual piles & boats rather than just a broad line of boats on moorings.

The loss of range can be countered by a decent AIS interfaced with the chartplotter which will alert you to any large ships at long range - leaving the broadband radar to focus on the closer range stuff.
 

tudorsailor

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I have just upgraded to the Raymarine C125 multifunction display. I was advised by the local Raymarine agent not to get a touchscreen. Firstly because touchscreens are more problem prone and secondly to avoid a screen with sunscreen'd fingerprints all over (I am in the Med). Of course the non-touchscreen is a bit cheaper too. I also got HD radar.

Very happy with both. The MFD has wireless so I have a 12" tablet at the chart table with which I can control the plotter in the cockpit.

Are you sure you really need the e series?

Overall happy with my choice to stick with Raymarine

TudorSailor

TudorSailor
 

doris

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Why not? No warm-up time, no fine tuning needed, much better short-range clarity.

Because I so rarely need radar and when I do the long range aspect seems important. I am informed that broadband is the dogs wotsits for short range but hopeless for over three miles.

Re. Touch screen. It will be down below and hopefully we will avoid too much Factor 30 on it. Seems a lot more future proof than the C series. I am happy to be corrected.
 

pvb

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It will be down below and hopefully we will avoid too much Factor 30 on it. Seems a lot more future proof than the C series. I am happy to be corrected.

I find it hard to understand why you wouldn't want a radar/plotter in the cockpit.
 

richardbayle

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I would go Garmin, more versatile and easy to use. Avoid touch screens as even water can accidentally change the keys and in bright sunlight damn difficult to see where you're pointing at. Also, in a rough sea where you're hanging on for grim death it's too easy to slide over the screen and miss the button you need.

Soft keys for me and since crossing the pond last year, decision totally vindicated.

Garmin watch brilliant too and can control auto-helm from your wrist useful if short handed and you need to adjust the steering from the foredeck. Good mob on it too, polus the normal gps stuff and you can link it to the chart plotter for deck use if you only have the one beside the chart table.

I like Garmin
 

jac

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Because I so rarely need radar and when I do the long range aspect seems important. I am informed that broadband is the dogs wotsits for short range but hopeless for over three miles.

Re. Touch screen. It will be down below and hopefully we will avoid too much Factor 30 on it. Seems a lot more future proof than the C series. I am happy to be corrected.

Think the 3 miles is a bit harsh. I had heard around 10 miles was practically the same but behind that pulse was better. Of course for 10 mile target identification you could use AIS until the target gets into radar range.
That said the product brochures show images of broadband radar detecting targets at 30miles plus and claim that they are worse than pulse radar at 16miles plus which ties in with what a radar lecturer told me.

Would seriously suggest researching the range piece again. I decided my next radar purchase would be broadband for exactly that purpose. Getting a yacht radar to see more than 20 miles or so means a scanner up very high so the practical loss of long range performance is minuscule.

The other factor to consider is the lower power drain of broadband which makes it much more possible to use it more under sail
 

doris

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Ta for all the input. Am off to the Small working boat show, Seawork, in Southampton tomorrow to look at all different types.
Am now better armed many thanks.
 
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