How to store cheese on board when you don't have a fridge?

peter2407

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Unopened cheese in sealed packs - in water possibly inside sealable freezer bags wgich means you could drop them overboard in yet more bags that are weighted and obviously the whole lot attached to the boat. Underway - similar arrangement either in the bilges or next to the FW tank, especially if steel. Or use freezer blocks if that is practical. Definitely in the dark in cool places away from heat sources.
 

guernseyman

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Reduce the cabin temperature with heat control film on the windows; wash the cheese with vinegar and store it in a locker in contact with the hull below water level.
 

prv

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What sort of cheese? Something hard and relatively dry like a decent cheddar would probably be ok as-is. A locker below the waterline will obviously be better than in the sun.

Pete
 

dancrane

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Today in Sainsbury's I saw some very delicious-looking miniature red peppers in olive oil, stuffed with goat's cheese.

We had feta-stuffed olives in the tent at the weekend too...no refrigeration. Presumably it's not necessary to wrap the cheese in vegetables...so I daresay much larger lumps could likewise be preserved for ages at room temperature.
 

prv

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Today in Sainsbury's I saw some very delicious-looking miniature red peppers in olive oil, stuffed with goat's cheese.

We had feta-stuffed olives in the tent at the weekend too...no refrigeration.

Indeed I have a feeling the Greeks probably invented feta before fridges :p

Pete
 

PuffTheMagicDragon

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Glass jar with a good screw top, scrupulously clean and perfectly dry. Cut (hard) cheese into usable chunks and place in jar. Cover totally with good olive oil or wine vinegar, whichever you prefer. Close jar and store in locker, preferably the coolest one that you have on board.

For use, spear chunk(s) with clean fork and remove from jar. Do NOT replace any left-overs.

Cleanliness is paramount; I use disposable rubber gloves when packing the chunks and I scald the fork before using it for 'spearing'. Never had a problem with this method. With the right kind of cheese you can also add some chillies or peppercorns for extra flavour when submerging in vinegar. Peppered goats' cheeselets are a local delicacy, perfect with fresh crusty bread or 'Galletti' ( hard-ish kind of water biscuit), or even crispbread.

Picture-37-e1347561156429.png
 

prv

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BobnLesley

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If you're talking a week in the tropics, or 3-4 in more northerly climes, then just wrapped in cling-film or poly bag in the bilge; if you're looking long-term then see below, based on personal experience in the Tropics, the cheese is good 3-4 months, longest we've left meat's 6 or 7 months, but one jar of butter we 'discovered' after 14 months and it was still fine:
Preserving cheese: Any cheese can be kept in oil. I tend to use cheddar orsimilar and the cheapest vegetable oil I can find. Use a wide mouth container with a good seal (you don’t want the oil to leak). Cut the cheese into usable size pieces, pack loosely in the container and cover with the oil. To use, take a piece from the oil and dry on kitchen paper. The longer the cheese is left the more mature it tastes, so start with mild/cheap cheese; for our taste, it gets too strong after about 4 months.
Bottling meat (Canning) - I use old jam jars etc. Any jar will do as long as you are satisfied that you will get a good vacuum seal. Sterilize the jars in the pressure cooker by steaming for 10 minutes with the lids loose, alternatively we just wash them with bleach then rinse them well. Cut the meat (any meat) into 1 inch chunks (or use mince or sausages) and pack in the jars leave about ½ - 1 inch headspace. Add ½ tsp. Salt or 1 bouillon cube (optional) we never add either. Add no liquid. Screw lids on tight and place in pressure cooker on a rack or trivet. Fill to about ½ - ¾ of the way up the jars with water and place lid on without the weight. Heat and free steam for 10 minutes then place weight on and once up to pressure cook for a further fifty minutes. Remove cooker from heat and let pressure release naturally. Remove weight and leave for another 10 minutes before removing jars. Place them on a towel away from draughts (don't know why/if that's important) After a few hours naturally cooling, the lids will ‘pop’ down, test the seals by checking that the lids remain concaved and do not pop up and down when pushed with a finger. Any that fails the test use straight away
BEFORE USING CHECK SEAL, SMELL CONTENTS AND IF IN DOUBT, THROW IT OUT
Brining Butter: Sterilize any wide mouth jar in boiling water or bleach and rinse. When cool press the butter into the jar to within ¾ inch of the top, while squeezing out all the air bubbles. Fill to the very top with cool, strong cold brine (1/4 cup of salt to 2 cups of hot water - cooled). Butter packed this way will last for 6-12 months in a cool place such as the bilge. Dip out butter with a clean knife as needed and top up with clean fresh water.
 

Blue Sunray

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Following links from there I somehow ended up in the realm of canned bacon:

ku-xlarge.jpg


The US, obviously :)

I have to admit I did google canned bacon UK to see if it was available here. Google responded with pictures of cat food :D

Pete

Used, a very long time ago, to get tins of bacon in the rat packs with cheese possessed. However since then one had to make do with tins of sausages and/or bacon grill. All gone now though - didn't work so well in the heat (god knows how the 8th Army survived ;-))
 

Minchsailor

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I have found that ordinary supermarket Stilon (just the shrink wrapped variety) is improved no end by leaving it for a couple of months in a Tupperware box is the bilge - fantastic taste and lovely creamy texture. This is in Scotland - probably not a good idea in the tropics.
 

l'escargot

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I have found that ordinary supermarket Stilon (just the shrink wrapped variety) is improved no end by leaving it for a couple of months in a Tupperware box is the bilge - fantastic taste and lovely creamy texture. This is in Scotland - probably not a good idea in the tropics.
I keep various cheeses unrefrigerated for weeks. If it is a blue cheese just eat it, if it is a hard cheese cut off the mould and eat the rest, if it is a soft cheese just pin it to the cheese board with a knife if it tries to walk away...
 
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