Egg before Chicken (or not?)

SiteSurfer

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Hi. I've been trawling this forum and despite now knowing 'more' than I did before - I'm curious about one aspect of practicality from a newbie perspective.

As a case study I've been looking at sub 26' 'economy' end of the market yachts, for family use. However - I am stumped as to whether I should arrange a mooring prior to purchase or wing it and get one afterwards - with possibly no where to keep the boat whilst negotiations take place to gain said mooring. Thinking of Gosport, Fareham, Chichester area.

I'm looking at bilge keels (or if smaller - then lifting) ideally. Coming from the Midlands its a case of remote administration almost! I had also considered asking around Y/C's in the area to see if they had drying out swingers (oooer) - but wasn't sure if that was so unlikely as to be wasting my time (and whether I'd get sniffed at for even asking).. I'm not overly keen on the over expensive Marina's although have found some nice boatyards thanks to (again) this forum.

So.. Boat first - Or Mooring?

Thank you.
 

prv

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I know you were thinking further east, but last time I looked Southampton Sailing Club had spare moorings and were actively soliciting new members to come and use them. I sail past their patch whenever I go out; they're shallow but don't actually dry. A "sub 26' economy bilge keeler" would fit right in.

No first-hand knowledge of the club; it was an option I persued at one point but never followed through.

There may well be other clubs in the area in a similar position.

Pete
 

Poignard

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There's a chandlery next door to Hardway Sailing Club that used to have moorings to let cheaply, and they had a rack in which to store your dinghy.

If you have been in the armed forces, the appropriate service club could probably offer you a mooring in Portsmouth Harbour.
 

jac

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Either way has risks - especially if the mooring owner does the typical - OOH - got one just come up - was going to offer but if you want and pay for it today, i'll keep it.

I would suggest ringing round a few places suggested on here - explain that are looking - about to put an offer in but want to confirm re mooring first. ( saying that you don't have boat at all and are "just looking" is sending tyre kicker messages. Assuming they have one - ask them to let you know if anyone else wants it as you are keen but still got to have offer accepted / survey etc. Then start looking hard.

If you can't find anything fairly quickly, Ring them and say original fell through - still looking is it still available etc. Unless it was a bargain mooring I would not pay for the mooring until I was certain re the boat. When you finally find the boat - make the call to the mooring owner - say have found boat - can you have mooring from the following month etc. Then put in offer/ have survey etc.
 

PhillM

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I don't think it matters. But I'd find the boat first. Even if you get a boat before a mooring, I'd wager that you could do a deal to keep her where she is for a few weeks while you sort out a new home for her.
 

SiteSurfer

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Emailing people now, if anyone else has a view I'd love to hear it.
 

KAL

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Depends where you want your mooring and whether there's a waiting list. If there is, then put your name down for one and leave the deposit, then when you find your boat, job's a good 'un.
 

abraxus

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I'd wager that you could do a deal to keep her where she is for a few weeks while you sort out a new home for her.
I would agree with that. When I bought my boat i didn't arrange a mooring first, and so got the broker to throw in 3 months mooring at the marina as part of the sale.
 

Seajet

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Definitely sort the boat first.

For very reasonable half tide moorings in soft mud, Chichester Harbour, I'm pretty sure Langstone SC has these available for lift or twin keelers up to 32'.

The club is on the bridge to Hayling Island, so has the choice of using Langstone Harbour - quicker to the Solent but nowhere to go in the harbour - and Chichester Harbour, a tad further to the Solent but loads of great places in the harbour if time or weather preclude going further.

There is locked dinghy stowage ashore, a good clubhouse and car parking for members, 2 nice old pubs, nature reserve etc nearby.

With ALL moorings, be careful to check there is somewhere secure to leave a rigid tender, and secure car parking; eg Emsworth is a lovely spot, but neither of the above is readily available...

If interested in LSC, PM me.
 

SiteSurfer

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This forum needs a like button :)
I spend most of my time on tech forums and the level of ass on those is staggering - this place is a breath of fresh air.
 

TiggerToo

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Guys, guys....

THIS IS A MASSIVE THREAD DRIFT.

No one addressed the original question:

It is ALWAYS the egg. Never the Chicken. By various hundreds of million years.

:encouragement:
 

niccapotamus

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both. as in do homework on mooring costs, club membership and availability

but don't commit until boat bought as mooring req might vary with the eventual boat bought, coz the final purchase will not necessarily be determined by your head but possibly by the boat you fall in love with
 

Fantasie 19

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I don't think it matters. But I'd find the boat first. Even if you get a boat before a mooring, I'd wager that you could do a deal to keep her where she is for a few weeks while you sort out a new home for her.

Probably right, but just for variety I did it the other way round... I took the view that a boat without a mooring is a nightmare, whereas a mooring without a boat is an opportunity.... :D
 

SiteSurfer

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the final purchase will not necessarily be determined by your head but possibly by the boat you fall in love with

Hmmm, Head says Wayfarer. Heart says Centaur. SWMBO says Optimist.

I would agree with Fantasie though, the idea of having a boat and nohere to put it does bother me, I had visions of sailing around in aimless circles looking for a home! However - I think I've managed to shrug off the whole preconception that you have to worry overly much about putting a boat somewhere short term, I think I'll do a bit of a mash up of ideas and look for both at the same time :)

Thanks all.
 

Stemar

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I'd do the two in parallel. Get an idea of what's available in the way of moorings, and how much you'll pay for a given size of boat, choose your boat then, while the purchase is going through, look for a mooring. Getting stuck in a marina at guest rates for a few weeks would hurt!

There's a chandlery next door to Hardway Sailing Club that used to have moorings to let cheaply, and they had a rack in which to store your dinghy.

They're gone, now based in Fareham and are called Portsmouth Moorings. I had one of their moorings, but their attitude annoyed me to the point that I'd drive into Gosport for a bolt rather than spend 50p in their shop.

Quay Lane Boatyard has moorings that won't break the bank, at least by Solent standards. You've also got Gosport Boatyard, a bit dearer, but you get a good water taxi service. Hardway Sailing Club has a waiting list to join (apply now & you'll probably get in next spring, leave it to February and you'll have almost no chance) and their moorings are dead men's shoes, so don't count on one. Well worth joining for all sorts of other reasons if you're based nearby, though.

Further up, you have Wicor Marine. No idea of charges, but they have pontoons out in the creek. A Google of "Portsmouth moorings" will come up with other options.
 
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