Day Skipper Course

oGaryo

Active member
Joined
28 Nov 2008
Messages
8,201
Location
Isle of Wight
Visit site
Just passed my Day Skipper shore based evening class and whilst I picked up loads of good info from the tutor and fellow students, I've come away feeling that not many, if any, folk fail this thing... a bit of cramming (30mins tops) before each of the exams and a marking scheme clearly designed to pass rather than fail makes me wonder if it's worth taking the practical if it's more of the same:confused:
 

dt4134

New member
Joined
9 Apr 2007
Messages
2,290
Visit site
Just passed my Day Skipper shore based evening class and whilst I picked up loads of good info from the tutor and fellow students, I've come away feeling that not many, if any, folk fail this thing... a bit of cramming (30mins tops) before each of the exams and a marking scheme clearly designed to pass rather than fail makes me wonder if it's worth taking the practical if it's more of the same:confused:

I always reckoned that someone with reasonable 'O' level standard maths who was willing to read up a bit could skip the DS theory and go straight to the YM theory.

The practical is a completely different kettle of fish (at least the sailing one is & I have no reason to believe the power one is any less useful).

You'll still have a lot more to learn after you do the DS practical, but I'd recommend you do it as you'll learn lots.
 

hlb

RIP
Joined
16 May 2001
Messages
26,775
Location
Any Pub Lancashire or Wales
Visit site
I always reckoned that someone with reasonable 'O' level standard maths who was willing to read up a bit could skip the DS theory and go straight to the YM theory.

The practical is a completely different kettle of fish (at least the sailing one is & I have no reason to believe the power one is any less useful).

You'll still have a lot more to learn after you do the DS practical, but I'd recommend you do it as you'll learn lots.

I found it unnecessary and a waste of time. Any almanac, or pilot book, will give you the tides for any harbour. Far more accurate and easier than any arithmetics,
 

Halcyon Yachts

Well-known member
Joined
17 Feb 2010
Messages
1,582
Location
UK
www.halcyonyachts.com
Just passed my Day Skipper shore based evening class and whilst I picked up loads of good info from the tutor and fellow students, I've come away feeling that not many, if any, folk fail this thing... a bit of cramming (30mins tops) before each of the exams and a marking scheme clearly designed to pass rather than fail makes me wonder if it's worth taking the practical if it's more of the same:confused:

Well done! Although you are right, not many fail... I am a Yacht Master Instructor and as such teach the RYA practical courses (in my spare time).

Most instructors will push you to learn as much as you can - the practical DS course is often the first time a student will have skippered a vessel, so they will give you extensive opportunity to learn and practice pilotage (day and night), boat handling skills (usually lots of this) and of course application of all the lovely things you have learnt on the theory course.

In my opinion it is a fantastically structured course. Being a 'Day Skipper' doesn't necessarily mean a great deal; I have met some whom could easily take a boat anywhere in the world and others who I wouldn't trust to steer a straight course...

Irrespective of ability at the end of the week, you can be assured that all students will have improved and have been exposed to new techniques and ideas. I have never had a student who hasn't really enjoyed the course - and in case you're wondering, yes, I have failed people on the DS practical.

I say go for it!

Pete
 

BGW

Member
Joined
1 Dec 2009
Messages
272
Location
Ireland
www.marina.ie
Just passed my Day Skipper shore based evening class and whilst I picked up loads of good info from the tutor and fellow students, I've come away feeling that not many, if any, folk fail this thing... a bit of cramming (30mins tops) before each of the exams and a marking scheme clearly designed to pass rather than fail makes me wonder if it's worth taking the practical if it's more of the same:confused:

I did wonder the same, but I now have a bit of card with my picture and ICC stamped on it.
Never needed it, but I get an additional discount on my insurance for having it.
I agree it's easy to pass, but worryingly there ARE people that fail or give up before completion.
I looked on it as reassuring comfort that what I was doing was correct.
The practical did the same - giving me more confidence.

Well done!
 

martin

Member
Joined
16 May 2001
Messages
417
Location
Herts
Visit site
Well done

Hi,

I thnk you should definately carry on. I did my dayskipper 15 years ago and didnt find it that hard...I did my yatchmaster commercial a few years back and found that some parts of the course were easy and some required serious cramming/practice. If you find it too easy, then I suggest trying to find a trainer that is willing to take you straight through to Yatchmaster offshore (theory and practical) based on your capability. It is frowned upon but they are out there...I know someone who did the YM in two weeks from nothing!.

I found the other YM required courses intersting too..Survival and First Aid good too. There is nothing like trying to haul yourself get into a Life raft in a pool to focus you mind on avoiding that situation in real life..:)
 

Victoria Sponge

New member
Joined
1 Dec 2010
Messages
12,090
Visit site
I think the practical is of use. There's things we learned that we use every time we go out in the boat.

I agree though that the whole DS thing is designed to pass. When we did ours a guy went from no experience whatsoever to passing theory and practical in 10 days. He had the certificate, but he didn't seem to know much about sailing.
 

PlanB

Well-known member
Joined
5 Sep 2004
Messages
2,424
Visit site
We were completely new to boating (and in our 50s) when we bought our first boat, a Princess 435. We did our DS Practical immediately, and found it gave us the confidence to handle our boat and understand the basics of navigation so we could short local trips.
Over the following winter we did the theory (and two out of 8 failed on our course), which made a lot more sense to us than we feel it would have done if we hadn't ever handled a boat. We were then able to venture a bit further afield, and three years after buying the boat and getting in a lot of practice, we brought her down to the Med via Biscay, safely and without scaring ourselves silly.
Individuals' needs and aptitudes obviously vary, but that way round worked for us. And I still think we did the right thing in doing both courses.
 
Last edited:

oGaryo

Active member
Joined
28 Nov 2008
Messages
8,201
Location
Isle of Wight
Visit site
sounds like the practical version is worthwhile in that case. the reason I mentioned this is that I got alot from the course because the tutor was great, it reinforced the couple of years experienced gained since owning a boat but.. I feel I shouldn't have passed as I certianly didn't put the work in due to enormous work pressures at present giving no time/energy to study and it had to be a case of grab the books 30mins before setting off to the college to sit the exam

I'm pretty sure that as a result, half the learning isn't in the long term memory banks and it'll have been forgotten in a couple of months..

If I were the tutor and was encouraged by RYA to maintain higher standards, I wouldn't have passed me. I also think RYA would need to have redesigned the exam marking structure 'somehow' to really put the learnings to the test.. this good, average, fair, poor results thing just seems geared to getting folk through the course with a bit of paper at the end of it rather than ensuring sailors set to sea really knowing their stuff.

I don't know, good worthwhile course just sitting uncomfortably knowing I could have put more effort in to it and feeling the awarding of a certificate shouldn't have been the outcome
 

BGW

Member
Joined
1 Dec 2009
Messages
272
Location
Ireland
www.marina.ie
sounds like the practical version is worthwhile in that case. the reason I mentioned this is that I got alot from the course because the tutor was great, it reinforced the couple of years experienced gained since owning a boat but.. I feel I shouldn't have passed as I certianly didn't put the work in due to enormous work pressures at present giving no time/energy to study and it had to be a case of grab the books 30mins before setting off to the college to sit the exam

I'm pretty sure that as a result, half the learning isn't in the long term memory banks and it'll have been forgotten in a couple of months..

If I were the tutor and was encouraged by RYA to maintain higher standards, I wouldn't have passed me. I also think RYA would need to have redesigned the exam marking structure 'somehow' to really put the learnings to the test.. this good, average, fair, poor results thing just seems geared to getting folk through the course with a bit of paper at the end of it rather than ensuring sailors set to sea really knowing their stuff.

I don't know, good worthwhile course just sitting uncomfortably knowing I could have put more effort in to it and feeling the awarding of a certificate shouldn't have been the outcome
I think you may be being a little unfair....
There were aspects of the course that were irrelevant to my circumstances, and of less interest. - I am sure i have forgotten the details of those areas now, BUT, I now know they exist and could easily research them again if required.
The areas that were relevant, I have used frequently, and maintained or grown my knowledge in. It's in my interest to ensure I keep up to date and competent.
The course has to follow a syllabus that covers a range wider than most people will experience or they would need a large number of specific courses.

If you failed your test on an area that was irrelevant to you would that seem fair?

You have a valid point, that it's not rocket science, but it's the foundation that ensures we all (should) know how everyone will react and what to expect - the alternative is legislation, and white lines painted on the water.... :D
 

Philiz

Active member
Joined
23 Aug 2008
Messages
2,888
Location
Staffordshire Moorlands U.K.
www.shabiera.co.uk
sounds like the practical version is worthwhile in that case. the reason I mentioned this is that I got alot from the course because the tutor was great, it reinforced the couple of years experienced gained since owning a boat but.. I feel I shouldn't have passed as I certianly didn't put the work in due to enormous work pressures at present giving no time/energy to study and it had to be a case of grab the books 30mins before setting off to the college to sit the exam

I'm pretty sure that as a result, half the learning isn't in the long term memory banks and it'll have been forgotten in a couple of months..

If I were the tutor and was encouraged by RYA to maintain higher standards, I wouldn't have passed me. I also think RYA would need to have redesigned the exam marking structure 'somehow' to really put the learnings to the test.. this good, average, fair, poor results thing just seems geared to getting folk through the course with a bit of paper at the end of it rather than ensuring sailors set to sea really knowing their stuff.

I don't know, good worthwhile course just sitting uncomfortably knowing I could have put more effort in to it and feeling the awarding of a certificate shouldn't have been the outcome

Whilst you may not have grasped all the finer point it is up to the instructor to assess whether you are capable enough at the level you're at. He must've been happy that you were. It's now up to you to hone your knowledge and practice what you haver learnt. So well done!
 

Philiz

Active member
Joined
23 Aug 2008
Messages
2,888
Location
Staffordshire Moorlands U.K.
www.shabiera.co.uk
I found it unnecessary and a waste of time. Any almanac, or pilot book, will give you the tides for any harbour. Far more accurate and easier than any arithmetics,

Agreed, but they don't show you how much the tidal set and drift is going to affect your COG, nor do they show you how to understand what the weather is likely to do in the next few hours, nor do they show you what the wind is likely to do when you're approaching a lee shore or a windward shore, nor does it explain advection fog, radiaton fog, katabatic winds etc.etc.
 

alant

Active member
Joined
30 May 2001
Messages
37,600
Location
UK - Solent region
Visit site
Can't be done!

Hi,

I thnk you should definately carry on. I did my dayskipper 15 years ago and didnt find it that hard...I did my yatchmaster commercial a few years back and found that some parts of the course were easy and some required serious cramming/practice. If you find it too easy, then I suggest trying to find a trainer that is willing to take you straight through to Yatchmaster offshore (theory and practical) based on your capability. It is frowned upon but they are out there...I know someone who did the YM in two weeks from nothing!.

I found the other YM required courses intersting too..Survival and First Aid good too. There is nothing like trying to haul yourself get into a Life raft in a pool to focus you mind on avoiding that situation in real life..:)

"YM in two weeks from nothing"

Impossible even if bending over backwards to bend the rules.

"Entry requirements
A minimum of 50 days sea time including 5 as skipper, and a total of 2500 miles completed. 5 passages over 60 miles including 2 overnight and 2 as skipper."
 

Doug_Stormforce

New member
Joined
6 Apr 2004
Messages
462
Location
Southampton, UK
www.stormforce.biz
Hi,

........ If you find it too easy, then I suggest trying to find a trainer that is willing to take you straight through to Yatchmaster offshore (theory and practical) based on your capability. It is frowned upon but they are out there...I know someone who did the YM in two weeks from nothing!......

Yachtmaster offshore theory and practical in two weeks from nothing- not a chance!!!
 
Top