Chooseing theboat

Wansworth

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At this juncture I have two boats more or less the same size but a good few years difference and one with an inboard and one with a outboard.On e of my dilemas is the new boat has the outboard and is real quite suited to sailing in the rías if I am honest….Gibsea 242…….the other is a Jennaue Sangria a yacht with pedigree and capable of more daring adventures.Logic says go with the Gibsea but my heart inclines towards the Sangria that has the old ya mar diesel inboard……any thoughts on this dilema
 

Stemar

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To my mind, an inboard engine is far better than an OB, even the clunky old Yanmars.

It rather sounds to me that it's the Sangria that's winking at you, like Jissel did to us when we bought her 20 years ago. She did us proud for 18 years before Jazzcat practically dropped in our laps - you know what it's like when a cat decides to adopt you, you have no say in the matter...

I always say you have to look with your head, but you have to buy with your heart.
 

doug748

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At this juncture I have two boats more or less the same size but a good few years difference and one with an inboard and one with a outboard.On e of my dilemas is the new boat has the outboard and is real quite suited to sailing in the rías if I am honest….Gibsea 242…….the other is a Jennaue Sangria a yacht with pedigree and capable of more daring adventures.Logic says go with the Gibsea but my heart inclines towards the Sangria that has the old ya mar diesel inboard……any thoughts on this dilema

Remind us of the details of each, if you have a moment.
 

rotrax

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We had, in the early seventies, a canal Narrow boat. It had a very old Yanmar YDS12 donk. It ran, in the summertime, ten hours each day. I gave it a top overhaul, decoke and valve grind and had my diesel bloke do the injector.

It never used any oil and was totally trouble free. Using the decompressor lever I hand cranked it each morning.

The transmission , an open epiclylic type with a large contracting band and an internal expanding drum, did however, require the contracting band, an all steel job as Yanmar made it, to be lined with brake lining material as the cost of a new one was outrageous. Once fixed, that was trouble free.

I would have no problem taking on an older boat with an older diesel.

But then I am an ex pro mechanic with 60 years on the tools.
 

Snowgoose-1

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At this juncture I have two boats more or less the same size but a good few years difference and one with an inboard and one with a outboard.On e of my dilemas is the new boat has the outboard and is real quite suited to sailing in the rías if I am honest….Gibsea 242…….the other is a Jennaue Sangria a yacht with pedigree and capable of more daring adventures.Logic says go with the Gibsea but my heart inclines towards the Sangria that has the old ya mar diesel inboard……any thoughts on this dilema
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doug748

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Thanks for posting the details. Don't like the look of that inboard, then again I don't like the look of that outboard - for different reasons.

So no idea really :). Perhaps negotiate and see what bobs up quickest. If you had to twist my arm, I would have the Gibsea, looks a bit expensive though.

.
 

Mister E

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IT depends on how you use the boat.
The inboard is more suitable for longer times using the engine.
More fuel efficient.
Doesn't cavitation.
The outboard is good for short runs.
Easy to remove and service.
Easy to sort out a rope around the property.
Cheaper to replace.

When we changed to boat I was glad we had the outboard.
 

Wansworth

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Thanks for posting the details. Don't like the look of that inboard, then again I don't like the look of that outboard - for different reasons.

So no idea really :). Perhaps negotiate and see what bobs up quickest. If you had to twist my arm, I would have the Gibsea, looks a bit expensive though.

.
Yes it’s 5000 euros more at this stage🙁
 

Wansworth

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Thanks for posting the details. Don't like the look of that inboard, then again I don't like the look of that outboard - for different reasons.

So no idea really :). Perhaps negotiate and see what bobs up quickest. If you had to twist my arm, I would have the Gibsea, looks a bit expensive though.

.
You hit the nail on the head,unfortunately 😏
 

V1701

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The outboard is in a well & not hanging off the back, take it home to service it. Why risk an old diesel that might have to be replaced? So assuming neither are in desperate need of new sails, bunk cushions, standing rigging I think in your position I'd go with the Gibsea...
 

Bobc

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Personally, assuming you are going to be doing local day-sailing, I would go for the Gibsea. A much more modern and mainstream boat and easier to live with and sell on, and the outboard is probably more of a benefit over the inboard, as you can take it off to service it, and you will get a similar motoring performance from it, with it being in a well with remote controls.
 

Wansworth

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Personally, assuming you are going to be doing local day-sailing, I would go for the Gibsea. A much more modern and mainstream boat and easier to live with and sell on, and the outboard is probably more of a benefit over the inboard, as you can take it off to service it, and you will get a similar motoring performance from it, with it being in a well with remote controls.
Yes that is the rational argument and I think we are leaning in that direction
 

Whaup367

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... a yacht with pedigree and capable of more daring adventures....

Assuming the condition of the more capable yacht doesn't preclude it's use for these adventures, I would say this is the key question.

If you get the less capable one, it may define your plans. Are you OK with that or do you still aspire to venture further afield? If the latter, get the more capable boat.
OTOH, if realistic thinking says they won't happen, get the other for an easier life.
 

LittleSister

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Yes it’s 5000 euros more at this stage🙁

The cheaper boat is not a saving if you buy something that isn't what you want/need.

As someone put it to me long ago, you first have to decide what you want something to do, then how much it costs to get that, and then whether you can afford it. It is a slippery slope to pay too much attention to price first, and risks a false economy (and worse) to 'save money' on something that doesn't actually do (or do properly) what you were buying it for. (aka 'cheap tool syndrome'!)
 
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