Average depths for anchoring

gibbowolfie

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OK I know I've asked generally about this before but having not anchored much I don't know the areas I'm likely to be anchoring therefore hard to settle on my chain and rope lengths. I am comfortable calculating the length I need for a given depth, it's what depth to plan for that's troubling me.

I'd like to get some ideas for easy anchoring spots too in the Solent.

Thanks for any advice.

Steve.
 
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I guess it depends what you plan to do when anchored and how much water your boat needs.

We tend to get in as close to the shore at Osbourne Bay, Newtown, various other rivers etc etc etc etc as we can to get the shelter from the shore and then "bob" on the end of the hook whilst reading the papers etc or go ashore in the dingy (obviously not at Osbourne).

We only need about 1m of water with the drive down so we go in to about 2.0m+ of water on a flood tide. Obviously if we are dropping the hook with the tide about to ebb we go in to 2.0 - 3.0m plus what ever the tidal range is for that area for that day so that we still have plenty of water to get out on.

Hope that helps.
 

oldharry

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I gnerally carry around 50m of chain, and have never yet been short of cable for anchoring. You could always carry another 50m of rope to attach to the end of the chain in an emergency.

Another very popular Solent anchorage is Priory Bay and Seaview just north of Bembridge, shallow, sandy bottom and beach, and well sheletered unless there is east in the wind.
 

aquaholic

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I am on the NE kent coast so spend most of my time anchoring in about 6ft of water........but do have 120ft of warp and 60ft of chain.
 

gibbowolfie

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Thanks guys. Doubt I'd want to carry 50m of chain in my 23ft boat and still make headway;-) and no winch but after going over the charts and tide curves I think I'd need enough to deal out 50m of scope to say cope with a MHWS in the Beaulieu river with a bit of spare.

I was therefore thinking of 20m 7mm chain with 30m 10mm rope.
 

Searush

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Rope's not that heavy. Have 2x 3om coils. If it is important that you don't touch the bottom you may need to choose deeper water to allow for swinging to tide change or being wind rode at slack water.

Another option is to use an Angel weight lowered to the seabed to retain the drag resistance of the anchor/ chain yet having a short rope scope to reduce swinging. The Angel can be stored in the centre of the boat or stern to minimise the impact on trim.
 

hylass

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[ QUOTE ]
Another option is to use an Angel weight lowered to the seabed to retain the drag resistance of the anchor/ chain

[/ QUOTE ]

In general we consider that a boat anchor in a max water height equal to its lenght (L.O.A.) (this is a rough estimation)

Forget about kellets (angel, chum, sentinel etc..),

- first you have to know where you should put it?? close to the anchor shank, in the middle of your mooring line or close to the bow??
- then for a angel weight not too heavy to be manageable.. the action is completely marginal..

see the mathematical calculation on: Web page about your anchoring rode .. and kellets
 

gjgm

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asuming its a stop for lunch and you are not anchoring offshore while leaving the boat for days, then Id say 2.5-3.5m water around the Solent, but watching the tides. We use a few metres of chain and rope, letting out 4-6 times in total. I can only think of one ocassion, this summer in fact, where we couldnt get it set- but then half the boats were dragging into to each other that day. Bear in mind, someone has to pull all this back up again. As long as you are on the boat, its not much of an issue if you have to let out more or maybe move to a better location. try a bit of practice early in the season, picking spots where others anchor- that means its usually a good spot, so you should have success. Might be there s a good reason no one is just round the corner!
 

duncan

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sounds a very sensible combination Steve. 50m is a relatively common total rode length and if you look around the chandlers they have these made up (but I wouldn't get one 'cos they they are extremely light on chain (4m) against the 10-20 that makes more sense.

but

and there's always one

the anchor is also a safety item, especially for small single engined powerboats! with this in mind I would suggest that you carry just that little more as that will enable you to hold in most of the water you will cover in your travels based in the solent. As already said rope doesn't weigh a whole lot, and 13m or chain is fine for your needs, so my personal recomendation would be 13m of 7 or 8mm chain (not 6) and 80m 12mm.

all the best
 
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There is no real average depth for anchoring because it will depend on many different factors like how quickly the sea bed shelves, how crowded the anchorage is, where the best holding is etc etc. Personally, I don't like to anchor my boat in less than 2.5m at LW because I like to have at least 1.0m clearance in case of any unexpected depth reduction due to swell or tide and no more than 10m because I reckon the holding power of the anchor/chain system will reduce as the angle increases
For an easy Solent anchoring experience try Alum Bay or Priory Bay and, if you fancy going further afield, Studland Bay, off Poole, is an excellent anchorage
 

gibbowolfie

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Mike, I struggled with making the subject line short and to the point. You said you anchored in somewhere between 3m and 10m which was just what I was after. Thanks for the anchorage suggestions I'l take a look at them on the charts and practice.

I should add I have a 2nd 5kg anchor as backup too.

One thing about overnight anchoring where a strong stream is expected, any tips? I'd like to spend the night in the lower reaches of the beaulieu river opposite Gull Island but not sure what to expect. Guess organise being there during the day and experience it for myself whilst it's light!
 
D

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I know the anchorage in the Beaulieu river you are talking about and yes it is a recognised anchorage but personally I would think twice about anchoring overnight there. Firstly, there's usually a couple of yotties who've got there first which means you will have to anchor further out into the river. Then as you say, you will be subject to tidal flow which will be stronger further out into the river but the main reason for not anchoring there is that you can go further upriver and pick up a buoy or tie up at the yacht club trots and have a far more restful night!
Generally speaking IMHO you should avoid anchoring overnight in areas affected by strong tidal streams. You don't know how the stream will affect the holding power of your anchor and, when the tide changes, all the boats turn round and there's a chance that there's a collision. Also, when the tide changes, there's a chance that your anchor breaks out. All in all, not a recipe for a good night's sleep as, if you're like me, you'll be up every couple of hours checking the boat
 

jhr

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I think you're right not to anchor there, in this case. Needs Ore point is so named because they used to build battleships at Bucklers Hard in the late 18th/early 19th century and then tow them round to Pompey (it took three days!) to be rigged and fitted out. The tidal current gets stronger round that corner, hence you needed some extra effort on the oars. At least, that's how they tell it at the Museum.

This ancient tradition is still honoured by many RIBbers, who have a tendency to give it some welly once they get past Gin's. /forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif
 

rickp

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Oh, I've overnighted there quite a bit - and never found it a problem, even when the tide turns. I've popped up to check we were okay, as we swung but never had to reset the anchor. Yes, you get the occasional pr@t going faster than 5knots and creating far too much wash, but it seems less of a problem than in other popular anchorages (Osbourne, Studland etc).

That said, we were in Totland overnight last weekend and it was pretty smooth. We were tempted to try Scratchells bay - but I think the Needles fog signal would have driven us batty after a couple of hours! Has anyone else overnighted there (in calm settled conditions)?

Rick
 

Nick_H

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which one is Scratchells bay? If its t'other side of the needles then yes we've anchored there during the day and brought up a boulder jammed hard into the anchor wedge. Took me half an hour hanging over the bow with a lump hammer to clear it, so it wouldn't be my first choice of anchorages.
 

jhr

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Tongue slightly in cheek when I posted, but nevertheless I don't think I'd describe the Beaulieu as an easy anchorage for someone with limited experience, though it has the advantage of being less crowded than somewhere like Newtown.

Though it's not in the Solent, I'd go for somewhere like the anchorage to the south of Brownsea Island in Poole Harbour - very sheltered in most conditions and a lot less current, also it's in the harbour quiet zone so - in theory - no hooligans /forums/images/graemlins/smile.gif.
 

rickp

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[ QUOTE ]
Though it's not in the Solent, I'd go for somewhere like the anchorage to the south of Brownsea Island in Poole Harbour - very sheltered in most conditions and a lot less current, also it's in the harbour quiet zone so - in theory - no hooligans /forums/images/graemlins/smile.gif.

[/ QUOTE ]

Just the trip boats /forums/images/graemlins/smile.gif Agreed though - thats a delightful area and very easy for a first overnight on the hook.

Rick
 
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