Anchor tripping - thoughts

bluedragon

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I don't like using tripping lines in a conventional way (with buoy) for a variety of reasons. But there are some anchorages where it's more than advisable to have something in place. So I've been thinking...

a) Instead of a buoy, a line running from the anchor and secured to the chain say 10-15m up. I'm unlikely to be in any more depth than this when the rode is vertical, so this should give enough to get it back on board. So long as this line is the same length as the anchor chain at the fitting point and firmly attached, I don't see it's going to cause any problems (like accidently tripping the anchor) is it? It's likely to be sitting on the bottom with the chain, though I suppose it could snag on something. Is this a better method than trying to pass a chain strop down the rode and over the anchor after it's fouled?

b) Tripping the anchor with either of the above lines: The idea of doing this by hand from a dinghy with a 14kg anchor well dug in and fouled is a non-starter in my book. So how about we take the tripping line back on board over the bow roller and use a winch...or motor ahead over the anchor?

Now all this is theory right now as I haven't tried any of the ideas...but I'm sure somebody has and will tell us the pros and cons as well alternatives :)
 
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theoldsalt

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If you don't like buoyed tripping lines then your ideas seem OK to me, just make sure the line is longer than the water depth at HW.
 

SHUG

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I don't see the point of a line and buoy attached 10-15metres from the anchor. If you think you will need a tripping line ....fit a tripping line. There was a thread on this quite recently and several people suggested that the best arrangement was to bring a line from the crown of the anchor, through the eye of a small buoy and back down to a fishing weight so that the line was always vertical.
Here is one of the previous threads on the subject:
http://www.ybw.com/forums/showthread.php?t=267093&highlight=tripping+line
 

Tom Price

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[QUOTE=SHUG: "If you think you will need a tripping line ....fit a tripping line."

Agreed, and long enough to bring back on board.
I've stopped using a separate anchor buoy; even with an anchor symbol painted on it another boat could use it as a mooring. One dark night we woke up being carried seaward over Salcombe Bar!

The bitter end of my chain is a lanyard long enough to come up through the chainpipe and be cut on the foredeck.
Have never been in that much of a panic but one day ?
 

noelex

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A buoy with a weak link just below the surface solves most of the traditional problems with a tripping buoy.
A line back along the chain doesn’t help if the chain wraps around an obstruction. If the chain twists the line can also jam.
 

prv

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I've not had to do it, but it seems fairly clear that if my CQR hooked under a ground chain then pulling it back out via the loop just below the hinge would easily unhook it.

Pete
 

Conachair

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Nobody commented on how to trip the anchor with the attached line. Who has actually ever done this? What worked / didn't work?

I've used a line before but never had to trip an anchor. 6mm dyneema about 10m tied to the roll bar then tied to the chain just under 10m so there was a little slack. Best to sieze the knots as well, current or naughty crabs seemed very able to untie a bowline.
 

Stemar

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I have used for our boat, and in helping other boats getting free, the chain strop around the rode and either pulled by the bow roller or by the dink.

Quick, simple, 100% success.
IMHO.

I tried it after hooking a trot when the engine died and the anchor was the only way to avoid thumping something expensive in a strong tide.

0% success. Anchor & chain still attached to trot :(
 
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..... b) Tripping the anchor with either of the above lines: The idea of doing this by hand from a dinghy with a 14kg anchor well dug in and fouled is a non-starter in my book. So how about we take the tripping line back on board over the bow roller and use a winch...or motor ahead over the anchor? ...

Hauling on the tripping line from the bow is the first approach. The only time I have used a dinghy was to get low enough to loop a rope round a chain that was fouling the anchor by fishing for a bowline. The anchor (CQR) would not release even when tripped.

If you are sure that the anchor is well dug in and not fouled, then I have found that bringing the anchor a peek (shortening to straight up and down) and then hauling the bow down a bit and just waiting, eventually weighs it.

I would tend not to motor over the anchor if it was fouled initially in case it makes the situation worse.

My tripping line is fairly hefty as its my secondary method of recovery if the windlass breaks down. Instead of hauling up on the chain, I haul up on the tripping line. The weight contribution of the chain goes from zero to half the scope length and makes a 60lb CQR on 10 mm chain recoverable by hand. Haul in the tripping line, tie off, haul up some chain, haul in the tripping line, tie off etc
 
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bluedragon

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Thanks. I didn't word the question well. What I was asking about motoring over the anchor, was this as a means of operating the tripping line, not powering-out a fouled anchor via the chain. In other words, if hauling the tripping line over the bow didn't work, perhaps because the angle was was wrong, then what about moving slowly ahead so the angle is now more likely to pull the anchor backwards away from the obstruction? Seems logical.

PS - I like the idea of using the tripping line to recover the anchor by hand if the windlass goes down. Hadn't thought of that!
 
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